Velominati Community Profile Archive

Velominatus: cognition

Order: Level 3 Velominatus

Location: Utah

Social: Website

Roadie since '87, just missing LeMan's heyday but squeaking in to read about Stephen Roche's trifecta in the pages of Bicycling magazine in my public library back in high school in New York. Raced briefly, without success, as a Cat 4 junior and then occasionally in college in Southern California. In order, I've owned and ridden: lugged steel Bianchi, lugged steel (531) Trek, lugged steel Paramount, Ritchey mountain bike, Ti Kona mountain bike, Ti LeMond, and an Al Specialized CX bike. Still have all of them, to my wife's dismay; I may already be at S-1. Heretically, I still like running and backpacking.

@cognition's activity:

Everyone knows you need at least three road bikes – two if you’re absolutely determined to make a point about minimalism. Bike Number One is reserved for good weather and events, and the Rain Bike for inclement weather. Just like our guns need to be pampered and rubbed down whenever we’re off the bike, any time Bike Number One isn...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @frank And here I thought that you should just convert it to a track bike for your next hour record attempt. »

I just got turned back from a ride. 5k from the house I realized my bits were getting too cold not only for comfort (in which case, apply Rule #5 and move on) but safety (i’ll take my vasectomy in the hospital, thank you very much). It’s a lovely sunny day, the only problems being the minus 12C temp, biting headwind, and leg warmers th...

@cognition's posts:

  1. Peakin’, Frank, G’rilla, I went up to the Iron Horse Trail at the end of last summer.  It’s a great trail, but I got to the section with the tunnel through the top of the pass and found that the surface through the tunnel is seriously shitty.  Like, fist… »

The Bike. It is the central tool in pursuit of our craft. A Velominatus meticulously maintains their bicycles and adorns them with the essential, yet minimal, accoutrement. The Rules specify the principles of good taste in configuration and setup of our machines, but within those principles lies almost infinite room for personal taste.It seems in s...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @the-farmer Wait, you’re looking for a set of wheels for your winter-training bike, that’s running 8-speed?  In my opinion, I’d pass on just about all of the recommendations so far and just look on your local Craigslist or equivalent.  Keep an eye out, a… »

Last year we read that Philippe Gilbert is riding a 50cm (top tube of 535mm) BMC frame and he is 1.79m (5’10”) tall. Now it’s reported in Cyclingnews that Ritchie Porte’s Pinarello is a 46.5cm frame (top tube of 515mm) and Porte is 1.72m (5’8”) tall. He is no Nairo Quintana but somehow he is on Quintana’s old bike. Porte is just one i...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @tessar Yes; I was trying to make the point that with a flat back and horizontal forearms, a pro’s hands now often hit the hoods, while a pro in the 70′s with a flat back and horizontal forearms would be riding in the drops.  I take your point, though. ab… »

  2. @Nate In fairness (regarding Ryder’s handlebar position), one thing that we’ve not talked about is the fact that “riding on the hoods” is the new “riding in the drops”.  There’s massively more saddle-to-bar drop amongst pros than there used to be in, say … »

Even though in today’s mountain bike world the bikes are better, the clothing more appropriate, and there are more trails to ride, there’s no denying the early 90s were the Golden Age of Mountain Biking. Just look at these fellas, and tell me I’m wrong.Tomac knew what was up. You don’t get such a badass Rainbow Jersey by ac...

@cognition's posts:

  1. …and if we’re even remotely talking about skinsuits in mountain biking, why hasn’t anyone brought up Paola Pezzo yet? »

  2. @frank Fair enough.  If for no other reason, the sport abandoned the tires and bike geometries of the gravel mountain roads for decades before we started looking at re-modifying ‘cross bikes or road bikes to ride things like D2R2 and Almanzo without killi… »

  3. Can I say a few words about Tomac?  I’ll admit that as a Pedalwan in the late 80′s I wasn’t too interested in mountain biking and the ex-BMX’ers in its pro ranks.  I was too focused on LeMond, Kelly, Roche, Anderson, et. al. Then Donald Trump (or someone… »

  4. @wiscot That, sir, is a Charlie Cunningham custom stem.  It was called an L.D. stem, because it goes straight up and then curves “down”, hence the Limp D… syndrome. Charlie has a number of other (more significant) contributions to early mountain bikes:… »

  5. @frank Really?  Drop bars on Tomac and Jaquie’s bikes were awesome in their own right, but I’ve always thought that the origins of the Graveur come from the Tour and Giro riders going over gravel roads in the Alps and Dolomites; particularly the legendary… »

Assuming you ride somewhere outside the borders of Antarctica, you have likely already heard about the injustice being imposed on our friend and fellow Velominatus, Dan Richter who goes around these parts as @Dan_R.I’ve been riding Dan’s wheels for a bit over a year, and they are the best I’ve ever had. After hearing about the sui...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @Beers I’m not confused about how it happened.  We elected people who wrote the laws, and then the courts agreed to ASI and Specialized’s claims.  I understand that.  I understand that there is a legal distinction between the usage of “Roubaix” in the c… »

We tend to look at cycling through rose-tinted glasses; cycling-specific ones that not only give us a cheery outlook on the past, but ones that conveniently hold big black bars over the bits we prefer not to remember as they were because they don’t fit into the picture we’ve formed in our minds. One of the most interesting things about...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @frank @frank Dredging this back up since the article popped up on the “Recent & Random Articles” feed, LeMond had a separate endorsement with Huffy to race bicycles under their badge when he raced in the United States.  I have no doubt that it’s … »

Assuming you ride somewhere outside the borders of Antarctica, you have likely already heard about the injustice being imposed on our friend and fellow Velominatus, Dan Richter who goes around these parts as @Dan_R.I’ve been riding Dan’s wheels for a bit over a year, and they are the best I’ve ever had. After hearing about the sui...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @VeloVita just missed your post while I was writing mine.  Fucking exactly. »

  2. Late to this discussion; sorry.  I am heartened to hear that ASI has some common sense,  I wish I could afford a new set of Café Roubaix wheels.  I’m also now vaguely depressed that my Graveur is a converted S-works ‘cross bike and that I’m too broke to d… »

Patience has never come naturally to me – I’m more Calvin than I am Hobbes in that regard. Yet I am meticulous and demanding of myself and those with whom I journey through life. It is a conflict that has caused its fair share of grief; my childhood is piled high with memories of incidents where I made choices and mistakes that robbed...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @unversio I get that; it’s just that with chrome stays, a chrome fork, and polished silver components, my aesthetic would be to finish off the job.  But then, I remember when the black-paint or black-ano components started to proliferate in the late ’80′s… »

  2. @frank I can’t help but think that a polished silver stem would be the final piece, bringing the Bianchi back into the realm of gleaming metal bits. »

  3. I will confess that I can’t really imagine walking into a bike shop today and walking out with an off-the-rack bike.  To say nothing of the fact that most LBS’s won’t stock my ridiculously tall size (198cm, thanks for asking — almost in Frank’s territory… »

My first bicycle opened a new world to me, one where range was measured by will and pedal revolutions, not steps; the only objective was seeing how far out I could push my range. First, to the border of our community, then to the nearest gas station, and on it went. It was a big yellow contraption with 10 speeds – twelve if you count “crash...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @RedRanger There are bikes to train on, bikes to race on, bikes to ride gravel on, bikes to ride cyclocross on, and bikes to commute on.  Better than taking an SUV a few km’s down the block to get groceries. “Ride Lots.”  –Eddy. »

A Velominatus maintains their machine with meticulous care, doting over it daily. A bicycle is a tool, but it is also a work of art, and serves us loyally in pursuit of our craft. We love them as though they were alive; as we grow together, the cracks and lines formed upon both our skins signifies the journey that has passed beneath our wheels.A cl...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @zeitzmar Having moved into the area (Burien/West Seattle) this past June, I drove across the city and into the hills to check out the Iron Horse Trail in August.  Brilliant ride until you get to the tunnel, at which point the gravel that had been an inte… »

  2. In my young and wayward days of high school and college I ran cross country.  While it’s a heinous set of violations of rule #42, I have to admit that I still look back on those days fondly.  Racing over hills in mud, snow, and melting muck; running a rac… »

After much debate and consideration (read: we got piss drunk after a ride, and started thinking about the next ride) and in full cooperation with the Keepers, we announce the first Stage Cogal, July 27 and 28, 2013 in Packwood, WA.We adhere strictly to the guiding principles of The Cogal: free to all, open to all. These events are about community,...

@cognition's posts:

  1. After much debate and consideration (read: we got piss drunk after a ride, and started thinking about the next ride) and in full cooperation with the Keepers, we announce the first Stage Cogal, July 27 and 28, 2013 in Packwood, WA.

    We adhere strictly to the guiding principles of The Cogal: free to all, open to all. These events are about community, and our love of the Bike. And of suffering. To those ends, even the casual observer will see what we have planned for routes is, in a word, a motherfucker.

    Cogals shall be long. And they are all about the bike. It is what you are doing that day. Well, we have extrapolated that to The V-to-V concept on this one, mates. V-to-V: volcano to volcano. These rides are not only long, but we tossed in some vertical. I, for one, am not a climber. But when it is What I Am Doing That Day, it will get it done (I roll a 180mm 50×34 compact connected to a 11×28 for just such emergencies.) As a 2 day stage Cogal, it is what you are doing that weekend.

    Day V1 is Packwood to Windy Ridge overlooking (and in) the blast zone of Mt. St. Helens. This route is generally used by a local bike club as a “High Pass Challenge” but we may modify their course a bit. In accordance with Rule #55, we will first ride UP the volcano, then we will ride DOWN the volcano. Route: http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1331324

    Day V2 is Packwood to Paradise on Ti’Swak (or Mt. Rainier to you non-natives) via Stevens Canyon road. I defy anoyone anywhere to find a more beautiful climb, starting at the Grove of the Founders on the east side of the national park. Only exceptions might be the Monuments, like Alpe d’Huez, or the Stelvio, but only because of their associated cycling lore. Route: http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1331326

    Once at the top, you have the option of a Rule #55 descent to Packwood. However, even the most casual observers of these routes will note a significant departure from any other Cogal:

    They are out in the middle of fucking nowhere.

    Thus, some support will be provided. On Day V1, some neutral, on the road support will be available, soley for transport of fuel and water. There simply are no cafes or shops, so to do these rides, the Keepers’ (or most likely the Keeper’s agent, @eightzero) will have arranged means to refuel for the participants. It may be van support, some caching of supplies, or a combination. On Day V2, there will be neutral fuel/water support on the climb, and an offer of transport of bags to the lodge at paradise the day of the ride. Some of us will be staying at the lodge to Get Shitfaced(tm) with a special keg, in full compliance with the rule of the Cogal requiring post-ride recovery malted beverage consumption. You may ride down, then drive up to join us if you wish, and/or then depart on your own schedule.

    Note (and this is very important) the summer schedule for these places fills up quickly and early. Summers are short and spectacular in the PacNW, and people line up to take advantage. The Lodge at Paradise has limited availability, so sign up early. Make early plans for staying in Packwood. For out of towners, SeaTac and Portland International (PDX) offer easy access, but there is an entry fee to the National Park. There are several lodging options in Packwood. We plan an early start both days; and the ride starts on time.

    Then prepare to meet The Man With The Hammer.

    We ride. VLVV.

    Event Details

    Loading Map....

    Date/Time
    Date - July 27, 2013 - July 28, 2013
    9:05 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location
    Butter Butte Coffee Company

    Cogal Details
    Route Details

    Ride Classification

  2. After much debate and consideration (read: we got piss drunk after a ride, and started thinking about the next ride) and in full cooperation with the Keepers, we announce the first Stage Cogal, July 27 and 28, 2013 in Packwood, WA.

    We adhere strictly to the guiding principles of The Cogal: free to all, open to all. These events are about community, and our love of the Bike. And of suffering. To those ends, even the casual observer will see what we have planned for routes is, in a word, a motherfucker.

    Cogals shall be long. And they are all about the bike. It is what you are doing that day. Well, we have extrapolated that to The V-to-V concept on this one, mates. V-to-V: volcano to volcano. These rides are not only long, but we tossed in some vertical. I, for one, am not a climber. But when it is What I Am Doing That Day, it will get it done (I roll a 180mm 50×34 compact connected to a 11×28 for just such emergencies.) As a 2 day stage Cogal, it is what you are doing that weekend.

    Day V1 is Packwood to Windy Ridge overlooking (and in) the blast zone of Mt. St. Helens. This route is generally used by a local bike club as a “High Pass Challenge” but we may modify their course a bit. In accordance with Rule #55, we will first ride UP the volcano, then we will ride DOWN the volcano. Route: http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1331324

    Day V2 is Packwood to Paradise on Ti’Swak (or Mt. Rainier to you non-natives) via Stevens Canyon road. I defy anoyone anywhere to find a more beautiful climb, starting at the Grove of the Founders on the east side of the national park. Only exceptions might be the Monuments, like Alpe d’Huez, or the Stelvio, but only because of their associated cycling lore. Route: http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1331326

    Once at the top, you have the option of a Rule #55 descent to Packwood. However, even the most casual observers of these routes will note a significant departure from any other Cogal:

    They are out in the middle of fucking nowhere.

    Thus, some support will be provided. On Day V1, some neutral, on the road support will be available, soley for transport of fuel and water. There simply are no cafes or shops, so to do these rides, the Keepers’ (or most likely the Keeper’s agent, @eightzero) will have arranged means to refuel for the participants. It may be van support, some caching of supplies, or a combination. On Day V2, there will be neutral fuel/water support on the climb, and an offer of transport of bags to the lodge at paradise the day of the ride. Some of us will be staying at the lodge to Get Shitfaced(tm) with a special keg, in full compliance with the rule of the Cogal requiring post-ride recovery malted beverage consumption. You may ride down, then drive up to join us if you wish, and/or then depart on your own schedule.

    Note (and this is very important) the summer schedule for these places fills up quickly and early. Summers are short and spectacular in the PacNW, and people line up to take advantage. The Lodge at Paradise has limited availability, so sign up early. Make early plans for staying in Packwood. For out of towners, SeaTac and Portland International (PDX) offer easy access, but there is an entry fee to the National Park. There are several lodging options in Packwood. We plan an early start both days; and the ride starts on time.

    Then prepare to meet The Man With The Hammer.

    We ride. VLVV.

    Event Details

    Loading Map....

    Date/Time
    Date - July 27, 2013 - July 28, 2013
    9:05 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location
    Butter Butte Coffee Company

    Cogal Details
    Route Details

    Ride Classification

The early eighties saw the tide change in the European Peloton. Components were taking on a new, curvy shape as they left their boxy forms behind. The glint of toe clips in the sun would become a rarer sight as the move towards clipless pedals would take hold in 1985. English speakers were winning the big races classically won by continental Pros.T...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @frank Can I persuade you to make that “due time” soon?  As a Velominatus Budgetatus, I’ve got a line on a very, very nice deal on a used 2006 Cervelo R3… but now I’m worried about pulling the trigger on it. Clearly, I should simply HTFU and ride my c… »

We’re into day four of the Six Days of the Giro series, let’s talk trash. Yes the Tour de France started a few years before the Giro and has always been credited as The Tour to win. You win the Giro, you are a stud. Win the Tour and you are a stud for life. Why is that? Is the Tour longer, tougher, more murderous, more beautiful? In the 20...

@cognition's posts:

  1. @unversio I had meant a complete Mavic groupset.  Not a fair comparison since they’re not in that game anymore, and also not fully fair since some of Mavic’s stuff from the SSC era is wonderfully quirky.  And they did manage to get an electric shifting gr… »

  2. Il Giro e la maglia rosa para me, grazie.  La Tour is a bigger deal; I won’t argue that.  But I’m an italophile from a young age: I’d rather eat italian than french, I aspire to Campagnolo, not Mavic, my first good bike was a Bianchi, not Peugeot, and I’d… »