Archive | Technology

The Sigma 1100

Reverence: Sigma 1100

by / / 89 posts

Simplicity. There is little in this world that I find more exciting than a complicated problem solved by a simple, elegant solution. Focusing on simplicity is particularly useful when weighingintricatecompeting facts because it allows you to say, “None of those complicated factors are likely to work out in my favor, so I’ll ignore them and…

Awesome enough for Briko Shots

We Were Young and Totally Rad

by / / 38 posts

It’s been an interesting week in the Velominati Archives of Awesomeness, after a freak discovery of boxes containing “photographs”. After conducting some research, we’ve come to understand that “photographs” are like pictures, except they are stored neither on the Geekbox nor on the Interwebs, but instead reside on a special kind of shiny paper that…

The numbers game just changed

Technology Simplified: The V-Meter.

by / / 42 posts

Training Properly clearly isn’t everyone’s bag, baby. Heart rate, power, cadence; it’s all bollocks if you are being told to hold back, or are put into a place where you don’t want/aren’t supposed to be. If it hurts, and you’re flying, it’s working. If it hurts, and you’re crawling, it’s not working. No amount of…

Bobet_02 (1)

Look Pro, Part II: Casually Deliberate

by / / 155 posts

Looking Pro is a delicate art rife with paradox and enigma. Aesthetics in a sport as difficult as cycling is itself a contradiction; surely anything wrought with such suffering should be driven by function and function alone. Yet cyclists are both some of the hardest people in sport and the most vain. For a cyclist…

Gianni's Campag DT Shifter adorns my keychain as a constant reminder of the sport and it's history

Deference: Gianni’s Campagnolo Down Tube Shifter

by / / 53 posts

It is dark now when I rise. It is dark when I return home from the office. Leaves crunch under the soles of my shoes as I walk in the city. The rides that once occupied a devoted period of each day have now become stolen indulgences of either serendipity or careful planning. The rain…

Obree in the initial stages of innovation. Photo via obree.com

Breaking the Rules: Graeme Obree

by / / 71 posts

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. Innovation is ugly, inelegant. By it’s very definition, it is carried out with almost a kind of contempt for The Rules. With no regard for aesthetics, it is a domain ventured into by the casually courageous and mentally frail. It comes in fits and starts,…

lombardy97-bartolitalk

Guest Article: Spinacis

by / / 29 posts

While we generally try to space out our guest pieces by a few weeks at least, we simply couldn’t resist the temptation to chuck this one up right on the heels of Oli Brooke-White’s post on Spinaci’s. After all, this is probably the second time in the Velominati’s history that a direct reference has been…

The Badger's attack blows Zoetemelk's eyebrows off.

Defining Moments: Radio Silence

by / / 47 posts

Robots.Automatons. Modern professional cyclists. I am tempted to say these three terms are interchangeable, but I know that’s not right because a “robot” endeavors to convey the impression that it acts of it’s own intent, whereas automatons and professional cyclists are merely self-operating machines. It is difficult for a Velominatus to look at old cycling…

An example of why off-road excursions are worth while.

Know Your Limitations

by / / 37 posts

I always strongly consider observationsfrom anyone willing to wave a 44 Magnum in people’s faces. As such, I’ve always appreciated Dirty Harry‘s recommendation that a man know his limitations. For example, I can appreciate that I am not an elegant creature and it is best if I avoid sports involving hand-eyecoordination. I’ve also noted that…

Lino Lacedelli and Achille Compagnoni at the summit of K2 in 1954. Photo: K2: Challenging The Sky

Doping: The Acceptability of a Method

by / / 60 posts

Performance-enhancing methods. This is a term we hear so often in cycling; it refers to the practice of using products or processes that elevate your performance beyond what you could naturally do. It is a terribly complicated matter for the fans, and I can only speculate as to how complicated it is for the professionals…

Certified hardman and aesthete, the Swiss rider Hugo Koblet.

The Cycling Aesthete

by / / 35 posts

There are those who are challenged to find the value of aesthetics in a sport which requires eating 11T cogs buttered with chain oil for breakfast and drinking kegs of Rule #5 at dinner. Ye of the Congoscenti, I present you with the following photos of some of the quintessential hardmen of our sport who…

A Velominatus' labor of love: working on a bike

Le Mecanicien

by / / 132 posts

Each of us remembers how they became a Velominatus. For me, it was at Grimpeur Wielersport, in Zevenaar, The Netherlands. Its the perfect place: a small shop, on a small street, in a small town, in a small country, run by a Giant of the Sport, Herman van Meegen. I haven’t been back in years,…

The way they used to do Rule 5

Italian Thoroughbred, Hand Built with Care in China

by / / 31 posts

While walking about town, one of my favorite things to do is to puruse the commuter bikes locked up outside stores and study some of the gems being ridden around. Sometimes, I come across a really special bike, and marvel at the notion that the bike’s owner might not have any idea what piece of…

l_1600_1200_465E54BF-60FA-4429-B552-2572F47F9FD4.jpeg

Dear Thule: GFY.

by / / 10 posts

Spoiler alert– this post has nothing to do with professional cycling or racing. This post is about trying in vain to get existing bike trays to fit on a new car. Given that we put a man on the moon and all, this seems only modestly ambitious. WRONG, says Thule. It can’t be done! At…

Before race radios, riders had to think for themselves or risk falling back to the cars to speak with their D.S.

Race Radio

by / / 12 posts

Anyone who watched Flanders and Paris-Roubaix can agree that the strongest and most deserving rider won both events; Fabian Cancellara dominated both races and did nothing to lessen his reputation as Spartacus. One thing that that struck me, however, is how significantly race radios factored into how the races played out. In Flanders, Fabian…

DSC01438

Mektronic and the Electronic Revolution

by / / 44 posts

The migration to electronic transmissions in cycling is inevitable. Cables have lots of inherent problems; they stretch, rust, break, and get clogged in their housings. Worse, they are part of an imprecise mechanical system that requires constant maintenance and adjustment, and one that can by design only work perfectly in one gear and gets progressively…

CUSTOM FRAMES

Framebuilding: Subcontractors and Big Names

by / / 18 posts

I’ve made mention before of Rouleur magazine and their amazing, in-depth articles. In one of the past issues, they had a wonderful piece on frame building in the eighties and nineties describing how many of the big names sourced the building of frames – especially custom frames – to subcontractors. The article focused on one…

fixie1-250x408

Fixie Challenge: Matching Aptitude to Confidence

by / / 35 posts

I think it goes without saying that riding a fixie properly takes quite a bit of skill and finesse; the pedals being directly connected to the rear axle demands a fluid pedaling technique when riding at speed, not to mention the skill required to stop (quickly) without brakes. The issue I have with the fixie…

IMG_2349

The Dahon

by / / 29 posts

My friend Robbie is no slouch on a bike. He is a former Mass-Rhode Island district road race champion, he has been beaten by the likes of Steve Bauer and Davis Phinney. The man can always get on a bike and haul ass, he always will. He drove by two days ago and was hot…

delta

The Golden Era: Downtube Shifters and Delta Brakes

by / / 39 posts

I miss downtube shifters. I miss them in the same way I miss the days before the widespread use of race radios, when races were less choreographed and more unpredictable. Racing on downtube shifters, a rider had to be seated and take one hand off the bars to shift. Shifting had to be planned into…

Scroll to Top