There are a few subtle indications of this not being  the right way to do it.

There are a few subtle indications of this not being the right way to do it.

Doing It Wrong

by / / 69 posts

Cycling is a complex sport, one whose fabric is densely woven from the fibers of a Hundred Years War between evolution and tradition. The Rules were laid out in part to provide a path through the chaos, helping lead the disciple towards transcendence. In the words of Pablo Picasso, “Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

This simple idea tugs at the underlying fact that the human mind tends to process ideas from the most obvious or easy to understand inward towards the most complex and difficult to understand. In other words, we start with What, then move to How, before finally arriving at Why. But because only 1/3 of the human mind is capable of rational thought while 2/3 of it operates on emotional or instinctual levels, the implication is that the How and the Why tend to be more instinctual or emotional than they are rational. Which is why we often know “Wrong” when we see it without necessarily being able to articulate the reasons behind it.

The Rules codify many aspects of Cycling; we can follow this code and understand fairly well when someone is in contravention of them; in essence, they provide the framework to elevate the “wrong” out of our instinctual mind and into the rational. At least when it comes to looking good on a bike or at the café.

Once in motion, the Velominatus sets themselves apart from other Cyclists by not only their outwardly aesthetic mastery, but by their comfort with how the bicycle moves beneath them; while in motion they handle themselves as if the machine is an extension of their body if not their very soul. Today’s objective is to begin to lay out a foundation for a framework on how to recognize when the actual act of riding the bicycle may be performed incorrectly. Keep in mind, as you coinsider this weighty subject, that Cycling is a sport which flaunts the Laws of Physics with not an inconsiderable sense of entitlement.

  1. If at any point you find yourself awakening from your ride in a hospital bed, there is a strong possibility that you have done something wrong.
  2. If at any point you find yourself in the dentist’s office having your jaw and/or teeth reconfigured as a result of launching face-first into an immovable and impermeable barrier of any kind, you probably demonstrated an overconfidence in either the mobility of permeability of said object, thereby doing it wrong.
  3. If at any point you find yourself surprised at how briskly the human body slides over tarmac before collecting yourself and riding to the emergency room where a curmudgeonly doctor briskly removes road debris from your wounds using a steel brush while muttering to himself about people’s “sense of invulnerability”, you probably overestimated your ability to hang ten in that one corner.
  4. If at any point you decide that the best way to learn to bunnyhop barriers in Cyclocross at full speed is to “commit” without first practicing this dark art, you are definitely doing it wrong.
  5. If you see an object in the road such as a pothole, log, or broken glass and ride through it before being astounded by the fact that this action resulted in a flat tire, you are doing it wrong.
  6. If you are riding in a group and touch another rider’s wheel with your wheel, you are doing it wrong. If you also thereby cause a crash, then you are doing it wrong to the point that you need to reconsider how well you concentrate while riding. If you react to said crash in any way other than assuming full responsibility and apologizing to the poor wretch(es) who are now possibly facing variations of points 1, 2, and 3 above, you are quite possibly an asshole which is one of the worst ways of Doing It Wrong (and a Rule #43 violation).
  7. If you arrive at a stoplight and fail to unclip from your pedals before falling over, you are doing it wrong. If this fall results in you breaking both your hand and elbow then you did it extra wrong. (I’m looking at you, @blackpooltower.)
  8. If you jovially parked your car in a garage while simultaneously and unintentionally removing your bicycles from your roof rack, you did it extra special wrong.
  9. If at any point during the climb you get off and walk, you are doing it extra special wrong times infinity.
  10. If at any point during your Cycling life you did any of the above without later laughing about it and spinning it into a wildly amusing tale of hubris and hyperbole then you are doing it extra special wrong times infinity with no backs.

// Etiquette // The Rules

  1. The worst is when you are doing it correctly but some asshat is doing it all wrong and takes you, and a few other in the group, into a culvert at 57kph. Descending the back side of a climb many years ago, one rider was late to brake into a right hander and crossed the double yellow. Just so happened to be a car in that lane which, to avoid the off-line rider, came into our lane sending one rider over the bonnet and myself and four others into a culvert. My fall was broken by the body of the rider in front of me, but then I broke the fall of two others. I came out of the ditch with a torn knee and my left thumb was opened by a piece of glass to the knuckle. Somewhere in the ditch lay my thumbnail. I still have the scar to remind me how quickly it can all go wrong.

  2. @Mark

    Rule #7 – Most do it in their early days. It is usually done at low speed in front of a crowd, and the only hurt is to one’s pride.

    Rule #9 – In my view forgivable if one is attempting a ride with a final climb significantly harder than previously attempted.

    Rule #10 – Yes, you do need to laugh at your own stuff-ups. A lack of a self depreciating sense of humor is unforgivable.

    Those aren’t Rules; so check yourself!

    THESE are Rules.

  3. @Sparty

    The worst is when you are doing it correctly but some asshat is doing it all wrong and takes you, and a few other in the group, into a culvert at 57kph. Descending the back side of a climb many years ago, one rider was late to brake into a right hander and crossed the double yellow. Just so happened to be a car in that lane which, to avoid the off-line rider, came into our lane sending one rider over the bonnet and myself and four others into a culvert. My fall was broken by the body of the rider in front of me, but then I broke the fall of two others. I came out of the ditch with a torn knee and my left thumb was opened by a piece of glass to the knuckle. Somewhere in the ditch lay my thumbnail. I still have the scar to remind me how quickly it can all go wrong.

    This is really the shittest part of the sport.

    Crashing is part of Cycling like tears are part of Love. – Johan Museeuw

    It can be scary descending unknown roads; I remember I almost took the whole group down because I led us into a tight switchback in really spotty light where I couldn’t tell potholes from shadows and had to hit the breaks pretty hard, sending everyone into hysterics.

    Amazing what the Pros do on unknown descents in the mountains.

  4. @Pete

    I once suggested an impromptu and unplanned town sign sprint in an attempt to catch out my dawdling riding companions.

    As I stamped rashly on the pedals my chain became unhitched, sending me chest first across the handlebars and into a parked car.

    The buckled wheel and groin rip in my winter tights suggests I was doing it wrong.

    Laughter was heard…

    Very similar to the precise incident which put me off Mavic Mektronic…townie sprint near an airport, some errant radio signal from, presumably, the control tower must have sent the chain across the block, causing it to snap. Back wheel demolished, frame cut up by broken spokes, and somehow I stayed upright and didn’t take anyone down.

    Heart in throat. Only time I’ve called the sag wagon for a ride home.

  5. @Owen

    Do we allow budding young Velominati a single pass on #7 above? Technically speaking yes falling off means doing it wrong but so long as you’re in a group of guys (or girls) who are all laughing at you because they’ve done it before, the first one should probably be free.

    It’s still Doing it Wrong, no?

  6. I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    @blackpooltower

    @Frank that is NOT how I broke my elbow/hand/rib/self-esteem.

    However, the way I in fact DID do it was … actually on reflection just as foolish, so I’ll say no more about it, beyond “smart shoes and fixed gears don’t mix, folks”.

    As you were.

    Sure it wasn’t.

  7. @frank

    I would never admit #9, and if video evidence was provided, I would still deny it. Never, never, stop and walk. Never.

  8. @frank

    Ah well, them’s the brakes.

  9. #9 is instinctive. Even when I first learned to ride, something like 50 years ago. There simply is no walking in cycling.

  10. @frank

    @Sparty

    The worst is when you are doing it correctly but some asshat is doing it all wrong and takes you, and a few other in the group, into a culvert at 57kph. Descending the back side of a climb many years ago, one rider was late to brake into a right hander and crossed the double yellow. Just so happened to be a car in that lane which, to avoid the off-line rider, came into our lane sending one rider over the bonnet and myself and four others into a culvert. My fall was broken by the body of the rider in front of me, but then I broke the fall of two others. I came out of the ditch with a torn knee and my left thumb was opened by a piece of glass to the knuckle. Somewhere in the ditch lay my thumbnail. I still have the scar to remind me how quickly it can all go wrong.

    This is really the shittest part of the sport.

    Crashing is part of Cycling like tears are part of Love. – Johan Museeuw

    It can be scary descending unknown roads; I remember I almost took the whole group down because I led us into a tight switchback in really spotty light where I couldn’t tell potholes from shadows and had to hit the breaks pretty hard, sending everyone into hysterics.

    Amazing what the Pros do on unknown descents in the mountains.

    Some major pucker factor to be found during speedy descending on unknown roads. Motorcycle riding has helped me hone my skills in these cases, but still sketchy at times nonetheless. It is amazing how much speed you can actually carry though a corner on a bike if you do not panic at the thought of going in too hot. Weight the outside pedal and handlebar drop and look through the turn. Saved my ass more than a few times. But it sure pumps the adrenaline and may leave you a little shaky afterward.

  11. @frank

    The sound of One Chain Snapping?

  12. To all those who were looking for a pass on the path to V-enlightment…

    …the path (aka “tarmac”) is unforgiving regardless of whether your Magnificent Stroke is feeding the Law of Inertia or if you have unwittingly commenced the process of converting kinetic energy back into potential energy (even if during a thorough application of Rule #64).

    A fuck-up is a fuck-up, regardless of the path you’re on.

  13. @Sparty

    The worst is when you are doing it correctly but some asshat is doing it all wrong and takes you, and a few other in the group, into a culvert at 57kph. Descending the back side of a climb many years ago, one rider was late to brake into a right hander and crossed the double yellow. Just so happened to be a car in that lane which, to avoid the off-line rider, came into our lane sending one rider over the bonnet and myself and four others into a culvert. My fall was broken by the body of the rider in front of me, but then I broke the fall of two others. I came out of the ditch with a torn knee and my left thumb was opened by a piece of glass to the knuckle. Somewhere in the ditch lay my thumbnail. I still have the scar to remind me how quickly it can all go wrong.

    Thumb scar notwithstanding, sounds like this could have been a lot worse.

    Was anyone else hurt badly?

  14. How much worse is it when you are warned and still do it wrong?

    Out cycling with a friend I spotted this sign.

    https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8459/7982927600_b528f17ebb_b.jpg

    Knowing the road wasn’t remotely dangerous, I pointed, laughed and headed down the bendy but very short and not particularly steep descent.

    My hubris was promptly followed by a skid on farmyard slurry at a corner and I became rather more intimate than desirable with the hawthorn hedge. Impressive but happily entirely superficial facial injuries resulted; the effects on my front wheel and ego were rather more serious.

  15. @RobSandy

    Jan 16, 2015 – Did the exact same thing going too fast into a corner. Protected the bike with my body -broke my collar bone, tore my labrum and bicep tendon. Not a scratch on the bike, so it was a pretty good ride.

  16. @RobSandy

    @Sparty

    The worst is when you are doing it correctly but some asshat is doing it all wrong and takes you, and a few other in the group, into a culvert at 57kph. Descending the back side of a climb many years ago, one rider was late to brake into a right hander and crossed the double yellow. Just so happened to be a car in that lane which, to avoid the off-line rider, came into our lane sending one rider over the bonnet and myself and four others into a culvert. My fall was broken by the body of the rider in front of me, but then I broke the fall of two others. I came out of the ditch with a torn knee and my left thumb was opened by a piece of glass to the knuckle. Somewhere in the ditch lay my thumbnail. I still have the scar to remind me how quickly it can all go wrong.

    Thumb scar notwithstanding, sounds like this could have been a lot worse.

    Was anyone else hurt badly?

    Miraculously no major injuries. Just sprains, strains, cuts and bruises. Likely a product of having youth on our side at the time. We were all around 22-23 at the time. If that were to happen now, we would be in pieces.

  17. I admit to violating #2. The dentist asked if I had the pieces of broken teeth so he could use them to repair what was left of the originals. Yeah right. After the impact I certainly didn’t have the presence of mind to look for them. All I could do was shake my head until my vision settled and I could pick myself up. Regardless of how wrong I was doing it, I can claim that my steed survived unscathed, no punctures even. Once my body settled back into itself, I picked myself up and rode the few remaining kms home, took a picture in the mirror for the archives, and called the dentist.

  18. That article was absolutely brilliant.

  19. Hi, I’m oldensteel and I too, have done it wrong:

    On the tail end (about 12k left) of a relatively easy 50k or so ride, I’m riding along thinking “wow, what a great day to be outside”. About then, I grab the water bottle and toast myself for my good judgement in getting on the bike today, take a swig and then realize I’ve swayed off line about a foot. This lines me straight up with a small 4 inch hole in the tarmac, I gracefully attempt to steer between it and the bots-dots on the white line while bringing my right hand (with bidon in said hand) back to the bars. The next 2 seconds involve an instant physics lesson which included my front wheel hitting the hole and the dots that I was trying to avoid.

    Imagine my surprise (while prone on the ground) as I watch my phone gathering speed down the tarmac as it’s being chased by my bottle (bottle caught up and ran it over for good measure). Mostly superficial cuts and scrapes (knee took the worst of it, saved the bike). However my wheel was now assuming a potato chip pose. A quick chuckle (and didn’t get ran over, Yes!), retrieve phone and bottle, remove broken spoke and spend about 10 minutes getting front wheel in mostly rideable shape and head home.

  20. I wasn’t doing anything wrong on Saturday when someone on the other side Did It Wrong by blasting the soccer ball directly into my open, unprotected groin. 2nd worst crotch shot I’ve taken in all my years. Ouch, it was not fun. 8:45 on a Saturday morning and there I was keeled over on the sideline.

    Sunday I get out of the shower. “Eeeeegaaad,” says the VMH. “Is that where the ball hit you?” she asks when she sees a big, black inner thigh bruise. “Oh no, that is where I decided to try a cyclocross remount while wearing regular pants, which snagged on the saddle, and I smashed my leg into it.”

    I Did It Wrong by attempting that remount in regular, loose pants. Somehow I didn’t fall over.

  21. Not to hard to do it right each and every day. Realizing that right is the only way makes it much easier to stay right.

  22. @Dave

    #9 is instinctive. Even when I first learned to ride, something like 50 years ago. There simply is no walking in cycling.

    Agreed. The correct way up a climb may sometimes include unclipping the instant all momentum has disappeared, but not before (h/t to @xyxax), followed by the possible motorist stopping to ask “dude… are you… OK…?” and responding (while inhaling wasps) “totally!” before proceeding. But NEVER walking.

  23. Back in the good old bad days I managed to get my hands on a set of Looks when they were the latest and greatest. Given that shoes did not come pre-drilled, it was a bit of a project to mount up the cleats on my old school Diadoras. So after finally getting things all sorted out, off I go on a ride to try out the new goods. All was going just fine until I came to a stoplight, whereupon I violated #7.

    Flopping around on the pavement as I attempted to clip-out, the look on drivers faces is burned into my memory. That, and the laughter of the cute blond who I was trying to impress.

  24. @litvi

    @Dave

    #9 is instinctive. Even when I first learned to ride, something like 50 years ago. There simply is no walking in cycling.

    Agreed. The correct way up a climb may sometimes include unclipping the instant all momentum has disappeared, but not before (h/t to @xyxax), followed by the possible motorist stopping to ask “dude… are you… OK…?” and responding (while inhaling wasps) “totally!” before proceeding. But NEVER walking.

    Mind you it’s bloody funny when on a long climb your mate simply runs out of energy and impetus and just keels over sideways and lies gasping in the road still clipped in and still gripping the bars.

  25. @Teocalli

    Uh-huh… “your mate.” Right.

  26. @litvi

    @Teocalli

    Uh-huh… “your mate.” Right.

    Ha Ha. Yup it was, honest.

  27. @Teocalli

    @litvi

    @Teocalli

    Uh-huh… “your mate.” Right.

    Ha Ha. Yup it was, honest.

    Then yeah, that’s hella funny!

  28. As has been stated already, #7 is simply a rite of passage. In regards to #8, Subaru is rather helpfully selling these via their website.

  29. @Teocalli

    @litvi

    @Dave

    #9 is instinctive. Even when I first learned to ride, something like 50 years ago. There simply is no walking in cycling.

    Agreed. The correct way up a climb may sometimes include unclipping the instant all momentum has disappeared, but not before (h/t to @xyxax), followed by the possible motorist stopping to ask “dude… are you… OK…?” and responding (while inhaling wasps) “totally!” before proceeding. But NEVER walking.

    Mind you it’s bloody funny when on a long climb your mate simply runs out of energy and impetus and just keels over sideways and lies gasping in the road still clipped in and still gripping the bars.

    You’re only allowed to do that at the top.

  30. @Bruce Lee

    Back in the good old bad days I managed to get my hands on a set of Looks when they were the latest and greatest. Given that shoes did not come pre-drilled, it was a bit of a project to mount up the cleats on my old school Diadoras. So after finally getting things all sorted out, off I go on a ride to try out the new goods. All was going just fine until I came to a stoplight, whereupon I violated #7.

    Flopping around on the pavement as I attempted to clip-out, the look on drivers faces is burned into my memory. That, and the laughter of the cute blond who I was trying to impress.

    That is a classic; I remember that first generation of Look could be really impossible to deal with – if you had any dirt in the cleat they would just lock down and were impossible to get out of. Classic!

    @Mikael Liddy

    As has been stated already, #7 is simply a rite of passage. In regards to #8, Subaru is rather helpfully selling these via their website.

    I would just get used to seeing that and forget about it full stop.

  31. @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    I don’ think I’ve done #9 since I was a kid (pre-teen), having to push a single-speed banana seat bike up the hill to my parents’ house on Crestview in Daly City, CA (according to Google, 0.1 mi and 13% grade).

  32. @chuckp

    @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    I don’ think I’ve done #9 since I was a kid (pre-teen), having to push a single-speed banana seat bike up the hill to my parents’ house on Crestview in Daly City, CA (according to Google, 0.1 mi and 13% grade).

    To be clear, even on a cross bike or mountain bike, its still doing it wrong, even though its strikingly prolific.

  33. @chuckp

    @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    I don’ think I’ve done #9 since I was a kid (pre-teen), having to push a single-speed banana seat bike up the hill to my parents’ house on Crestview in Daly City, CA (according to Google, 0.1 mi and 13% grade).

    I say you get a pass because on a banana seat it’s not Cycling, that’s just being a kid, having fun. And man that ride down must have been a blast!

  34. @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    @blackpooltower

    @Frank that is NOT how I broke my elbow/hand/rib/self-esteem.

    However, the way I in fact DID do it was … actually on reflection just as foolish, so I’ll say no more about it, beyond “smart shoes and fixed gears don’t mix, folks”.

    As you were.

    Sure it wasn’t.

    @frank What if I admit to ascending a 19% ramp in our local area, being that determined not to transcend into a # 9 situation, that an eventual #7 happened.

    Wrong and right all at the same time.

    However, laughter and swearing was had and heard.

    At least I wasnt like the guy next to me who was trying to alleviate his own personal battle with #9 that he ending up blowing chunks of breakfast all over bike and road and ended up on side of road anyway.

    Ahhh, good times

  35. @Barracuda

    @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    @blackpooltower

    @Frank that is NOT how I broke my elbow/hand/rib/self-esteem.

    However, the way I in fact DID do it was … actually on reflection just as foolish, so I’ll say no more about it, beyond “smart shoes and fixed gears don’t mix, folks”.

    As you were.

    Sure it wasn’t.

    @frank What if I admit to ascending a 19% ramp in our local area, being that determined not to transcend into a # 9 situation, that an eventual #7 happened.

    Wrong and right all at the same time.

    However, laughter and swearing was had and heard.

    At least I wasnt like the guy next to me who was trying to alleviate his own personal battle with #9 that he ending up blowing chunks of breakfast all over bike and road and ended up on side of road anyway.

    Ahhh, good times

    You forgot to mention that you were also riding in weather that was being provided directly from Satan’s furnace…

  36. @Mikael Liddy

    @Barracuda

    @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    @blackpooltower

    @Frank that is NOT how I broke my elbow/hand/rib/self-esteem.

    However, the way I in fact DID do it was … actually on reflection just as foolish, so I’ll say no more about it, beyond “smart shoes and fixed gears don’t mix, folks”.

    As you were.

    Sure it wasn’t.

    @frank What if I admit to ascending a 19% ramp in our local area, being that determined not to transcend into a # 9 situation, that an eventual #7 happened.

    Wrong and right all at the same time.

    However, laughter and swearing was had and heard.

    At least I wasnt like the guy next to me who was trying to alleviate his own personal battle with #9 that he ending up blowing chunks of breakfast all over bike and road and ended up on side of road anyway.

    Ahhh, good times

    You forgot to mention that you were also riding in weather that was being provided directly from Satan’s furnace…

    Fuck it was hot wasn’t it !!!!

    In my defence or just in my mind, I was slowing to see how Dan was after losing his lunch.

    You on the other hand, machine Sir. I still tell people I meet who share the same love of cycling of your efforts that day and the 100 + Km ride in the dark the night before just to make the staring line.

    But yes, it was even too hot for a fire to start. Now that’s hot

  37. @litvi

    @chuckp

    @frank

    I’m really amazed at how many of you are admitting to breaking #9. This is the most egregious of the lot.

    I don’ think I’ve done #9 since I was a kid (pre-teen), having to push a single-speed banana seat bike up the hill to my parents’ house on Crestview in Daly City, CA (according to Google, 0.1 mi and 13% grade).

    I say you get a pass because on a banana seat it’s not Cycling, that’s just being a kid, having fun. And man that ride down must have been a blast!

    I think even as a kid I only walked my bike up the hill but a few times. Most of the time we rode but had to zig zag up the hill. Although I’m probably a “natural” climber by body type/weight, having to ride up the hill at the end of every ride probably did a lot to help develop my ability to climb (even though I didn’t become a serious cyclist until I was an adult in my late 20s).

    Yeah, riding down the hill was a blast. There was an even longer (but not as steep) hill in our neighborhood that we used to fly down too. But what was truly frightening was riding down on late 60s/early 70s era skateboards!

  38. Q: Where does one fall if they combine a #5 that was not called out, an inability to recognize the effect said #5 had on their front tire, and a #3 about a half mile later in the first corner after the said #5?

    A: On the tarmac….and wrong.

  39. Oh I managed to do it very… very wrong about 2 years ago.

    It was a stunningly beautiful late spring day in the foothills (let’s be honest, they’re proper mountains) that surround Evergreen, Colorado and after being informed of a cancelled work meeting I decided to get a ride in, as you do.

    I was enjoying a splendid purple patch of good form, and although I was still too fat to climb, I was climbing quite well, so I climbed.

    My velomihottie (wife) was nine months pregnant with our second child and already enduring about a weeks worth of false contractions. So I figured one last ride and all.

    1.5k from where my car was parked after 4300ft of climbing I was zen like in a blissful orgy of swooping arcs down a little used canyon road. Then in a instant, all was not well. Carrying 50kph into a descending radius left hander a car found it prudent to pass me on the inside whilst crossing the yellow lines. I tried to adjust my line and ended up just above the gulch in the ravine with multiple fractures of my tibia and fibula (think Mini-Phinny) as a log poll pine was kind enough to break my flight.

    Funny thing is I knew instantly I’d done it wrong as my first thought was “my wife’s gonna kill me!!!”

    Body is healed with the help of copious amounts of titanium, but my wife is still very distrusting of ‘that damned bike.’

  40. Doing it wrong is sometimes just the lesson you need to remember to do it right thereafter.

    My own experience with negative reinforcement came when I foolishly tried to navigate a corner at speed bisected by slippery when wet train tracks during a downpour. The cycling gods body slammed me to the pavement with such speed that my hands never even left the bars.

    A cracked helmet and a minor concussion and now I’m much more observant of the laws of physics and my own mortality when in the saddle. I’m thankful for the lesson I received.

  41. Riding your Grifter aged 9 and with brake blocks down to the metal, you think it would be cool to brake by placing the sole of your adidas gazelle’s against the fast rotating front tire. Cue friction – grip – both feet catapulted up under the fork crown – front wheel lock up – launched headlong over handlebar. Two broken toes, emotional wounds incalculable. Did it wrong

  42. When you’re a tourist in another country and get mixed up about what side of the road you should be driving on, that’s doing it wrong. Thankfully it doesn’t seem that the consequences will be too severe.

    http://cyclingtips.com/2016/01/giant-alpecin-confirms-degenkolb-barguil-haga-and-three-others-involved-in-collision-with-car-in-spain/

  43. @Mikael Liddy

    When you’re a tourist in another country and get mixed up about what side of the road you should be driving on, that’s doing it wrong. Thankfully it doesn’t seem that the consequences will be too severe.

    http://cyclingtips.com/2016/01/giant-alpecin-confirms-degenkolb-barguil-haga-and-three-others-involved-in-collision-with-car-in-spain/

    FUCKING painful! And guaranteed that this driver is sipping fucking margaritas by the pool right now if Spain is anything like the USA or England. Supposedly the driver crossed the center line and hit them all head on. Jail is too fucking good for her but she’ll never see a day inconvenienced for running over cyclists.

    Sorry for the rant but inattentive drivers, either texting or checking their GPS or watching inboard videos or fuckall have really made me nervous on the roads. I know I sound like grandpa here but it really was not this bad 25 years ago. Scares the hell out of me.

  44. @Mikael Liddy

    When you’re a tourist in another country and get mixed up about what side of the road you should be driving on, that’s doing it wrong. Thankfully it doesn’t seem that the consequences will be too severe.

    http://cyclingtips.com/2016/01/giant-alpecin-confirms-degenkolb-barguil-haga-and-three-others-involved-in-collision-with-car-in-spain/

    I know it’s wrong but I read those reports and couldn’t help thinking “What’s the weight of a finger, and does he really NEED it?”.

    Especially if you’re running Di2. I’ve thought this through.

  45. @ChrisO

    @Mikael Liddy

    When you’re a tourist in another country and get mixed up about what side of the road you should be driving on, that’s doing it wrong. Thankfully it doesn’t seem that the consequences will be too severe.

    http://cyclingtips.com/2016/01/giant-alpecin-confirms-degenkolb-barguil-haga-and-three-others-involved-in-collision-with-car-in-spain/

    I know it’s wrong but I read those reports and couldn’t help thinking “What’s the weight of a finger, and does he really NEED it?”.

    Especially if you’re running Di2. I’ve thought this through.

    He’s a sprinter so he probably does need a good grip. I expect if it had been a climber he’d have tried to persuade them to leave it off. Marginal gains…

  46. @RobSandy

    @ChrisO

    @Mikael Liddy

    When you’re a tourist in another country and get mixed up about what side of the road you should be driving on, that’s doing it wrong. Thankfully it doesn’t seem that the consequences will be too severe.

    http://cyclingtips.com/2016/01/giant-alpecin-confirms-degenkolb-barguil-haga-and-three-others-involved-in-collision-with-car-in-spain/

    I know it’s wrong but I read those reports and couldn’t help thinking “What’s the weight of a finger, and does he really NEED it?”.

    Especially if you’re running Di2. I’ve thought this through.

    He’s a sprinter so he probably does need a good grip. I expect if it had been a climber he’d have tried to persuade them to leave it off. Marginal gains…

    Whether it’s to lose weight or to be able to carry on racing, you would have thought that amputating body parts might be one step too far even for cyclists…

    …instead of abandoning the race, he abandoned the toe. He’d lugged it through the Alps but jettisoned the excess ballast ahead of the Pyrenees.

  47. @chris

    I recall seeing a story about one of the gold-medal-winning British men’s pursuit teams and their quest for marginal gains.

    Apparently they identified that three of them were all very aerodynamically similar but Ed Clancy (I have a vague idea it was him) was two inches wider in the shoulders.

    Apparently he asked if they wanted to cut some width out of his collarbone.

  48. @ChrisO

    Their coach wasn’t a Jewish loan shark form Venice, per chance?

  49. @ChrisO

    Now that you mention it, I vaguely remember that as well.

  50. finally had one idea to start right with building up (rebuilding) the Merckx on a BB stand

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