Big Mig, waiting for an appointment with the Man with the Hammer.

Big Mig, waiting for an appointment with the Man with the Hammer.

Waiting for the Man

by / / 68 posts

You have three questions going through your mind:
How far to go?
How hard am I trying?
Is the pace sustainable for that distance?
If the answer is “yes”, that means you’re not trying hard enough. If it’s no, it’s too late to do anything about it. You’re looking for the answer “maybe”.

Chris Boardman, on The Hour Record, Rouleur

Cyclists, whether on the start line of a race or at the café before a group ride, are a chatty bunch. How’s your training going? The legs feeling alright? How do you like Di2? I could never go electronic, need to feel the cable, you know – need to be connected to my bike. 

I wouldn’t go so far as to call it “substantive conversation”; we are more leg than brain, after all. But no matter how good the form has been, we are always worried that it has somehow left us, and worry tends to make the mouth go. Chatter distracts the mind from the doubts that should have been nagging us the last month about our training, but who only turned up about ten minutes before we arrived to the start, long after there was anything we could do about it.

The Contre la Montre, on the other hand, always shows a different rider. No matter how dominant the rider, they are always deep in thought, never chuckling, never grinning. There is no one to lighten the mood, no distracting the mind from the pain and inherent uncertainty of the body’s ability to cope with the suffering that is to come. There is an appointment with the Man with the Hammer somewhere on the road you are about to travel down; he is as unpredictable as he is ruthless.

The rider who waits on the start line of a time trial is a rider who is squaring up with the reality that no matter the state of their training, they are waiting for the man.

// La Vie Velominatus

  1. @litvi

    C’mon guys. A quote from Boardman in an article about the Hour? A profile shot of a forlorn looking Indurain? Snippets from pre-ride conversations @frank has with @Haldy about the cables on his track bike? This isn’t about time trials.

    This is obviously a thinly veiled icebreaker about two things: another attempt at the Hour is on the horizon, and @frank needs a fourth and fifth question to run through his head as he turns in lap after lap. Boardman’s three questions are terribly lacking in number. He needs V.

    Something along the lines of:

    4. Should I have rebuilt this as a left-hand drive after I tore it down for a VLVV paint job?
    5. Which hand is the Left, anyway?

    or

    4. Why am I doing this?
    5. No, seriously, how much farther is there to go?

    You get the idea.

    Frank needs only to calculate the Coefficient of Difficulty for himself — then he’ll need his powers of abstract focus to see the number { coefficient } — which ideally is V or V.2V

  2. @Buck Rogers

    @ChrisO

    I think it’s because you just know what’s going to happen in a TT.

    A road race can unfold in a hundred different ways. A TT will be either brilliantly painful or horribly painful and not much in between… spot the common thread.

    It’s also that you have that stone cold minute when the rider in front has gone. You roll up to the line, wait for the 30 second call before clipping in and having the bike held and then the final five second countdown – all your thoughts are bouncing around in your pointy helmet.

    And at the end I hate it when you’re a few seconds away from some benchmark. In three of the five open TTs I’ve done this year I’ve been one place off a podium or prize money, and the gaps have been 3, 4 and 9 seconds. In hindsight it’s always easy to think you could have gone 5 or 10 seconds faster but it’s bloody hard to think of that on the road.

    There is one great thing about TTs which deserves a mention though – the minute man.

    I love having someone to chase. I still stick to my gameplan but it’s fun seeing whether you are catching them up and going past someone early on is quite uplifting.

    On the other hand I hate being caught.

    Really great insight and thoughts.

    I agree with loving having the rabbit out front but I, personally, live in pure mortal fear and dread of the guy coming up from behind!

    And yes, I have won the Wooden Medal more than once over the last few years and it so sucks, doubly-so if you are only a few seconds back!

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Every TT should involve pointing your bike directly at the entrance to the pain cave. How deep you go in is up to you, but you have to go in nevertheless. I remember finishing some rides feeling lightheaded. Those were the fast ones. Happy, happy days.

  3. @universo

    Frank needs only to calculate the Coefficient of Difficulty for himself — then he’ll need his powers of abstract focus to see the number { coefficient } — which ideally is V or V.2V

    Yeah, but math is like… hard n’ shit. I was after the idea of how a phrase or two will repeat itself on loop in your mind throughout the course of a criterium or time trial.

    Or wait… does that only happen to me?

  4. @litvi

    @universo

    Frank needs only to calculate the Coefficient of Difficulty for himself — then he’ll need his powers of abstract focus to see the number { coefficient } — which ideally is V or V.2V

    Yeah, but math is like… hard n’ shit. I was after the idea of how a phrase or two will repeat itself on loop in your mind throughout the course of a criterium or time trial.

    Or wait… does that only happen to me?

    Not just you. Me too — used to berate myself by thinking “wake up!”. Frank may not like doing math while onboard — throwout the analytics.

  5. @universo

    @litvi

    @universo

    Frank needs only to calculate the Coefficient of Difficulty for himself — then he’ll need his powers of abstract focus to see the number { coefficient } — which ideally is V or V.2V

    Yeah, but math is like… hard n’ shit. I was after the idea of how a phrase or two will repeat itself on loop in your mind throughout the course of a criterium or time trial.

    Or wait… does that only happen to me?

    Not just you. Me too — used to berate myself by thinking “wake up!”. Frank may not like doing math while onboard — throwout the analytics.

    @frank may not like doing math while onboard what? Earth?

  6. @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Some TTs on fast courses will have more applicants than spaces and they will have a PB cut off. A guy in our club with a 25 mile PB of 54 mins got knocked back for an event on the course where Alex Dowsett set the national record.

    Not come across any chatty starters yet but it would be annoying for sure. People are always chatty afterwards – TTs have good cake I generally find – but pre-race most observe respectful introverted silence.

  7. @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Some TTs on fast courses will have more applicants than spaces and they will have a PB cut off. A guy in our club with a 25 mile PB of 54 mins got knocked back for an event on the course where Alex Dowsett set the national record.

    Not come across any chatty starters yet but it would be annoying for sure. People are always chatty afterwards – TTs have good cake I generally find – but pre-race most observe respectful introverted silence.

    Yup, we did it proper. It was always a subtle sign of your standing if you got a 0 or a 5 number.

    Couldn’t get in with a PB of 54 mins? That’s crazy, but just shows you how things/times have changed. I’m not sure what the Scottish record for a 25 was in the 80s, but I doubt it was 54 minutes. Maybe 55 something – probably by Graeme Obree. Our courses were just not that fast and TT bars and disc wheels were in their prohibitively expensive infancy. My PB (on a standard steel Colnago road bike) was 57′ 40″ on a course with numerous long drags and 13 encounters with roundabouts! I think only national championship TTs filled up regularly.

    I just checked, the Scottish 25 mile record is indeed held by Obree – 48′ 43″.(1994) He holds the 10 record too with 19′ 29″ (1997) In fact, Graeme holds the 6 fastest 10 times (no-one went sub 20 minutes in Scotland until David Whitehall in 1982, if that tells you how fast/slow the courses are) and the four fastest 25 times. That both Obree’s records are now about 20 years old tells you how awesome he was.

  8. I’m still waiting for Godot.

  9. @KogaLover

    @Buck Rogers

    @Oli

    Got twenty-six dollars in my hand…just in case I need to stop at a cafe.

    You got me again, Oli. Which famous cyclist said this??? (and that famous cyclist better not be Oli!)

    Bowie, and he’s dead. Didn’t know he rode a bike though…

    Bowie? BOWIE?? It’s Lou Reed!

  10. An alternative to the TT/Hill Climb – http://denbiesduels.webplus.net/index.html

  11. @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Seriously? Every TT I’ve done (apart from club ones) has been with the ‘seeded’ numbering. You know the fast guys if they are a multiple of 10. Maybe one day I’ll be a multiple of 5, one day.

  12. @RobSandy

    @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Seriously? Every TT I’ve done (apart from club ones) has been with the ‘seeded’ numbering. You know the fast guys if they are a multiple of 10. Maybe one day I’ll be a multiple of 5, one day.

    I forgot to add, tradition held that the first rider off (#1) was a member of the organizing club. This was done on the understanding that he/she knew the course well and would stop and fill in for a missing turn marshall if needed. Ahhhh, the good old days.

  13. @Oli

    If ever I had twenty-six dollars in my jersey pocket, it would be 20 too many and I’d be obligated to buy a frothy coffee drink for the next cyclist who hobbled into the cafe in cleats behind me. If one needs more than VI dollars on a ride, best to sign up for Apple Pay.

    I ran rode down to the leveeBut the Devil caught me theretook my twenty dollar billAnd vanished in the air

  14. @Oli

    @KogaLover

    @Buck Rogers

    @Oli

    Got twenty-six dollars in my hand…just in case I need to stop at a cafe.

    You got me again, Oli. Which famous cyclist said this??? (and that famous cyclist better not be Oli!)

    Bowie, and he’s dead. Didn’t know he rode a bike though…

    Bowie? BOWIE?? It’s Lou Reed!

    Fucking brilliant! Love it!

  15. Talking of coffee. Visited a new (to me) roaster today and they are experimenting with Cold Brew Coffee. Apparently it’s the latest hot (well cold) thing on the West Coast. Interesting. They had two variants, just plain cold brew and cold brew in a keg with nitrogen gas pressure. It comes out a bit like Guinness with a head that settles out (Espresso Guinness).

    The nitrogen keg variant had a much deeper flavour than the plain cold brew and it was the same bean being used. Knocked spots off the plain version. Strong stuff too. Most interesting.

  16. TT racing to me is less about “waiting for the man” and more about “seeking out the man”. Once you find him, the goal is to ride with him until the last kilometer and then try and leave him behind. Easier said than done. But if you do it this way, you will have to be helped off your bike after the finish line. If you have a crit later in the day, don’t ride with the man or you will be pulled from the crit after the first 20 minutes. This story is true.

  17. @litvi

    What I want to know is what event is that shot of Big Mig from? The logos on his chest seem to indicate something linked to the ’92 Barcelona Olympics, but given he’s in his trade team kit that’s unlikely, and I seem to remember that being the last one without the pros.

  18. @Mikael Liddy

    I’m pretty sure that’s taken before the Luxembourg TT at the 1992 Tour de France; as one of Spain’s biggest banks, and with the ’92 Olympics being held later that year in Barcelona, Banesto was an Olympic sponsor, hence the advertising on his kit for that and the Seville Expo also.

  19. @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Seriously? Every TT I’ve done (apart from club ones) has been with the ‘seeded’ numbering. You know the fast guys if they are a multiple of 10. Maybe one day I’ll be a multiple of 5, one day.

    I forgot to add, tradition held that the first rider off (#1) was a member of the organizing club. This was done on the understanding that he/she knew the course well and would stop and fill in for a missing turn marshall if needed. Ahhhh, the good old days.

    I looked into this a bit more, wondering if maybe I just hadn’t noticed. There seem to be several camps,

    The CTT regulations do indeed suggest that top riders have 5 minutes between them but it’s pretty vague and just says ‘faster’ riders.

    However there’s been some suggestion that it can mean substantially different conditions for people who should be posting similar times so there are events which just seed slowest to fastest.

    But that leaves open the idea of riding ‘in company’ because if a rider is caught then the speed differential will not be so great. So there are also some races where people seed fast/slow in an odd/even pattern.

    This has of course been taken as a quite severe provocation on the TT forum, which seems to thrive on perpetual niggly controversy.

    Just don’t mention the 3cm rule.

  20. @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @ChrisO

    @wiscot

    This. From 81 to 90 I must have ridden hundreds of open and club TTs. In the early years I was the one being caught, but gradually got a better number and did some catching. A good (full field) TT will have the fastest 11 guys at numbers 120, 110, 100 etc, and the next 11 fastest at 115, 105 etc. In between are the rabbits!

    The worst thing is a chatty timekeeper. You want to warm up, collecting your thoughts for the effort ahead and get your mind right. Nothing worse than a timekeeper or holder that wants to converse.

    Interesting, I like that idea. In the UK they do it as in the Tours. Slowest first, fastest last.

    Seriously? Every TT I’ve done (apart from club ones) has been with the ‘seeded’ numbering. You know the fast guys if they are a multiple of 10. Maybe one day I’ll be a multiple of 5, one day.

    I forgot to add, tradition held that the first rider off (#1) was a member of the organizing club. This was done on the understanding that he/she knew the course well and would stop and fill in for a missing turn marshall if needed. Ahhhh, the good old days.

    I looked into this a bit more, wondering if maybe I just hadn’t noticed. There seem to be several camps,

    The CTT regulations do indeed suggest that top riders have 5 minutes between them but it’s pretty vague and just says ‘faster’ riders.

    However there’s been some suggestion that it can mean substantially different conditions for people who should be posting similar times so there are events which just seed slowest to fastest.

    But that leaves open the idea of riding ‘in company’ because if a rider is caught then the speed differential will not be so great. So there are also some races where people seed fast/slow in an odd/even pattern.

    This has of course been taken as a quite severe provocation on the TT forum, which seems to thrive on perpetual niggly controversy.

    Just don’t mention the 3cm rule.

    If I remember my TT rules correctly, a caught rider should drop back immediately and not draft. Not that that stopped guys from doing it though. Often a well-directed profanity helped dissuade him and there was always the implied threat of reporting the draftee to the timekeeper. The beauty of the seeding system, if done properly, meant that the riders in the 1,2,3,4, 6,7,8,9 numbers were somewhat evenly matched. The faster guys, the 5s and 10s, should be fast enough to catch and drop the other numbers and not encounter another 5 or 10.

    Obree caught everyone, but always had the manners to shout “dig in” as he scorched past.

  21. @wiscot

    @ChrisO

    If I remember my TT rules correctly, a caught rider should drop back immediately and not draft. Not that that stopped guys from doing it though. Often a well-directed profanity helped dissuade him and there was always the implied threat of reporting the draftee to the timekeeper. The beauty of the seeding system, if done properly, meant that the riders in the 1,2,3,4, 6,7,8,9 numbers were somewhat evenly matched. The faster guys, the 5s and 10s, should be fast enough to catch and drop the other numbers and not encounter another 5 or 10.

    Obree caught everyone, but always had the manners to shout “dig in” as he scorched past.

    I remember going across a roundabout on my very first TT and catching a glimpse of a rider approaching me from behind out of the corner of my eye. I knew he was about to pass and was really conscious I shouldn’t go anywhere near his rear wheel and risk drafting; he shot past like I was stationary. I couldn’t have held his wheel if I’d have sprinted. Turned out to be one of our strong club riders on a short 21 (I think I did a mid-25 IIRC).

    Also read a delightful story about Sean Yates catching and passing a French rider in a Grand Tour TT, and the guy sitting on his wheel. He ignored the barrage of profanities but eventually got the message when Sean managed to spit in his face.

  22. Lining up for cross races is bad enough for my nerves; I think I’ll avoid TTs.

    I’m mightily chatty on group rides, but I really don’t like talking about form, power meters, etc. I’m into bikes and going fast, not data. But, I know cycling attracts former/current math nerds and the like. I’m glad your form is good, but I don’t wanna hear about it…

    Nice one, Frank!

  23. @Ron

    Lining up for cross races is bad enough for my nerves; I think I’ll avoid TTs.

    I like to make sure I’m almost late for the start – keeps the heart rate up and gives you a shot of adrenaline.

    There’s nothing like riding a TT – nowhere to hide, no excuses, just you and the road. There’s a reason it’s called the Race of Truth.

  24. A few shots from our end of season hill climb. I didn’t ride (the old refrain of I’m not in shape, next year) but instead acted as Angus’ soigneur. I did partake in the tea and cake afterwards.

    Warm up.

    Final rise. It’s not the hilliest hill climb, it is Cambridgeshire after all. There’s a steep rise at the start then it drops off and flattens out before the final rise. One of our members and resident testers is also quite handy with a camera.

    The good turn out from the juniors.

    Fortunately this didn’t turn up until we’d finished although it threaten to crush the cars parked on the farm track next to the start.

  25. Loving the Defender in that final photo!

    Oh yeah, the photos of your “lean and mean” kiddo are pretty great as well! How did he fare?

  26. @Buck Rogers It’s drwarfed by the combine.

    Stupidly impractical and uncomfortable but a Defender could well be the replacement for the current Disco.

    Angus did OK but got beat by the other lad in his age group which annoyed him. He hadn’t ridden the course and told me afterwards he felt he could have gone much harder. His leanness is annoying – especially when he asks me questions like “have I got a six pack?”

    That first photo should have been a gif although I suspect that @frank has restricted my ability to post those after I broke the site with the infinitely recurring mini phinnies.

  27. @chris

    A few shots from our end of season hill climb. I didn’t ride (the old refrain of I’m not in shape, next year) but instead acted as Angus’ soigneur. I did partake in the tea and cake afterwards.

    Warm up.

    Final rise. It’s not the hilliest hill climb, it is Cambridgeshire after all. There’s a steep rise at the start then it drops off and flattens out before the final rise. One of our members and resident testers is also quite handy with a camera.

    The good turn out from the juniors.

    Fortunately this didn’t turn up until we’d finished although it threaten to crush the cars parked on the farm track next to the start.

    End of season? In early September? Shure shome mishtake? Mid October was when things used to end . . .

    The boy has form though to be sure.

  28. @chris

    That first photo should have been a gif although

    Thanks for clarifying, I did wonder about the “snowstorm” filter effect.

  29. @wiscot

    End of the TT season. It would be nice if it could go on longer but in this age of H & S, the finishing time is constrained by light (and we lose it earlier than you did back in the day in Scotland). Starting time is constrained by the time people can get away from work.

    Angus wanted to ride home from the event last night but he didn’t have any lights on and there are a few sections of woods where it would have been too dark.

  30. People who have actual hills still do them in October. TTs are still going – I’ve got a 25 on the 18th but they are starting to wind down.

    The Catford and Bec Hill Climbs are October 9 and I think the Nationals are a week or two after that.

  31. @ChrisO

    We are looking to move the annual hill climb to the Waitrose multistory car park. It longer, steeper, flood lit and has a huge range of cake.

    Cycling is becoming more middle class after all.

  32. @ChrisO

    The hill climbs you mention are all on Sundays when light isn’t the issue that it is on weekdays.

    Besides, we’re gentlemen and we don’t race on Sundays.

  33. @chris

    @ChrisO

    We are looking to move the annual hill climb to the Waitrose multistory car park. It longer, steeper, flood lit and has a huge range of cake.

    Cycling is becoming more middle class after all.

    If you moved it to the Iceland carpark you could practically have a closed course.

  34. @chris

    @wiscot

    End of the TT season. It would be nice if it could go on longer but in this age of H & S, the finishing time is constrained by light (and we lose it earlier than you did back in the day in Scotland). Starting time is constrained by the time people can get away from work.

    Angus wanted to ride home from the event last night but he didn’t have any lights on and there are a few sections of woods where it would have been too dark.

    My apologies. I should clarify. The only TT’s I remember still being held in early October (I used to go on vacation the last two weeks of Sept, before Uni started the 2nd week of October) were the Tour of the Trossachs hilly TT, and a couple of Gentleman’s TTs (one in Bearsden, the other in East Kilbride). All were held on the weekend when light wasn’t an issue.

    Gentlemen’s Races were fun. Basically one rider had to be a “veteran” (ie, over 45; that would be me now – yikes!) and would pair up with a younger rider. Theoretically the younger rider paced the older one, but such was the longstanding rivalry between some of the vets, that they were highly competitive races. I rode a few with a fast vet from Dundee, Dave McCallum, and we shared the pacing. Unfortunately he was relatively “young” and so we got a low handicap allowance., so while we did well on actual time, we lost out on the handicap which favored the older riders.

  35. The correct machine for timetrialling in the Waitrose car park

    https://www.facebook.com/overheardinwaitrose/photos/a.381735128634532.1073741828.375139409294104/560537307420979/?type=1&theater

  36. @verytallguy

    The correct machine for timetrialling in the Waitrose car park

    https://www.facebook.com/overheardinwaitrose/photos/a.381735128634532.1073741828.375139409294104/560537307420979/?type=1&theater

    Pity, fails Rule #52 but if you can bring it down to a smaller bottle of max 500ml, sure, why not?

  37. @KogaLover

    @verytallguy

    The correct machine for timetrialling in the Waitrose car park

    https://www.facebook.com/overheardinwaitrose/photos/a.381735128634532.1073741828.375139409294104/560537307420979/?type=1&theater

    Pity, fails Rule #52 but if you can bring it down to a smaller bottle of max 500ml, sure, why not?

    It would seem that one of the benefits of Brexit will be the reintroduction of imperial pints of champagne. Perfect for the gentleman racer.

    Maybe, they’ll also carry on producing Land Rover Defenders…

  38. @chris

    It would seem that one of the benefits of Brexit will be the reintroduction of imperial pints of champagne. Perfect for the gentleman racer.

    Maybe, they’ll also carry on producing Land Rover Defenders…

    I doubt the Keepers will consider to change Rule #24 (no Imperial measurements) nor #52 (max 500ml).

    And an imperial pint of champagne is a bit of an oxymoron, isn’t it?

  39. @KogaLover

    @chris

    It would seem that one of the benefits of Brexit will be the reintroduction of imperial pints of champagne. Perfect for the gentleman racer.

    Maybe, they’ll also carry on producing Land Rover Defenders…

    I doubt the Keepers will consider to change Rule #24 (no Imperial measurements) nor #52 (max 500ml).

    And an imperial pint of champagne is a bit of an oxymoron, isn’t it?

    It’s a tautology.

    You couldn’t have a metric pint. That’d be an oxymoron.

  40. @KogaLover, @RobSandy, Tautology, whatever. It’s a thing to use the modern parlance. They just haven’t been around for a while.

    As far as I’m concerned, there are somethings that can’t be governed by Rule #24.

    The club 10 is not a 16.09344 km event. The same goes for it’s 25, 50 and 100 mile counterparts.

    Centuries are imperial.

    And if I’m to carry a bottle of fizz around on my bike, a pint is perfect. Rule #24 covers liquids and Rule 52 states bidons are to be 500 – 610 so a pint would be within that range. Not that one would put champagne in ones bidons. We’re not savages after all.

  41. @RobSandy

    Being pedantic – but this is vital stuff – Imperial just distinguishes it from a US pint. 568ml vs 473ml.

    So a standard bottle of champagne is just shy of 4/3rds of a proper pint, but 8/5ths of a US pint.

    Apparently we upgraded our weights & measures after they left the Empire…

  42. @BenH

    @RobSandy

    Being pedantic – but this is vital stuff – Imperial just distinguishes it from a US pint. 568ml vs 473ml.

    So a standard bottle of champagne is just shy of 4/3rds of a proper pint, but 8/5ths of a US pint.

    Apparently we upgraded our weights & measures after they left the Empire…

    Being pedantic, I think you mean 20 fl oz vs 16 fl oz

  43. @chris

    And if I’m to carry a bottle of fizz around on my bike, a pint is perfect. Rule #24 covers liquids and Rule #52 states bidons are to be 500 – 610 so a pint would be within that range. Not that one would put champagne in ones bidons. We’re not savages after all.

    If you’re drinking champagne while cycling, it’s because you’ve been handed a glass by your DS from the team car because you’re about to ride into Paris wearing yellow.

  44. Wow, there’s a 90 year old entered into my last TT of the season on Sunday. Makes the two 74 year olds look positively youthful.

    It’s a Veterans TT Association event (Vets = Over 40) so it lists the ages and our Standard target times for 25 miles. His is 1:36:06, but frankly who cares – wonder if I’ll still be doing it in 40 years.

  45. @ChrisO

    Respect! My mum gave up skiing at 90 the season before last.

  46. @ChrisO

    Wow, there’s a 90 year old entered into my last TT of the season on Sunday. Makes the two 74 year olds look positively youthful.

    It’s a Veterans TT Association event (Vets = Over 40) so it lists the ages and our Standard target times for 25 miles. His is 1:36:06, but frankly who cares – wonder if I’ll still be doing it in 40 years.

    Let us know if this individual shows up on a C bike with Di2 shifters and disc brakes… Cheers

  47. Well he’s off 8 minutes ahead of me so if I don’t see him I’m having a bad day.

  48. @RobSandy

    @KogaLover

    @chris

    It would seem that one of the benefits of Brexit will be the reintroduction of imperial pints of champagne. Perfect for the gentleman racer.

    Maybe, they’ll also carry on producing Land Rover Defenders…

    I doubt the Keepers will consider to change Rule #24 (no Imperial measurements) nor #52 (max 500ml).

    And an imperial pint of champagne is a bit of an oxymoron, isn’t it?

    It’s a tautology.

    You couldn’t have a metric pint. That’d be an oxymoron.

    Tautology: imperial pint

    Oxymoron: pint of champagne

    Oxymoron: metric pint

    Capisci?

  49. @KogaLover

    @RobSandy

    @KogaLover

    @chris

    It would seem that one of the benefits of Brexit will be the reintroduction of imperial pints of champagne. Perfect for the gentleman racer.

    Maybe, they’ll also carry on producing Land Rover Defenders…

    I doubt the Keepers will consider to change Rule #24 (no Imperial measurements) nor #52 (max 500ml).

    And an imperial pint of champagne is a bit of an oxymoron, isn’t it?

    It’s a tautology.

    You couldn’t have a metric pint. That’d be an oxymoron.

    Tautology: imperial pint

    Oxymoron: pint of champagne

    Oxymoron: metric pint

    Capisci?

    100% agree old bean.

  50. Well bloody hell, the old chap won on handicap.

    He did a 1:20 something which put him 15 minutes below his Standard time and in first place.

    He was off 8 minutes ahead of me and I didn’t pass him until about 10 miles in.

    I just managed to squeeze under the hour with 59.45. Was hoping for a little more but a 58 was probably my aspirational target so it’s not far off. It’s a course where pacing is very difficult.

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