The way down should hurt as much or more than the way up. Photo: Jared Gruber

The way down should hurt as much or more than the way up. Photo: Jared Gruber

On Rule #93: The Throw Down

by / / 70 posts

The human mind is designed to forget how much things suck. That is a fact. If women had the capacity to retain meaningful data on how horrible things can be, there would be exactly zero families on the planet with more than one child. This has nothing to do with how wonderful children are; it has to do with how birthing a child is the most painful thing one can do in this life and live to tell the tale. Or so I’m told. But women happily bear a second or even a third child; with each labor a fresh-faced surprise at how much the birthing process blows on a visceral level.

On the other hand, we are very good at remembering how great things can be. Like sex. Which is an ironic counterpoint to the above paragraph. I swear I didn’t plan that. (I don’t “plan” any of my writing. I do this for fun.)

I ostensibly observe at this stage in the article-writing-process that maybe I should start planning some of my writing. Because this is going nowhere.

I am vocally quiet about my uneasiness with Strava from the perspective that it causes us to focus on doing good times on segments of our rides which is in conflict with the discipline required to Train Properly. That said, Strava can be a lot of fun in the sense that it provides a kind of passive-active competitive nature to Cycling. To that point, I have been riding with the group out of Hedrick Cycles in Greenwood, Seattle recently; the owner, Carson, is on a rampage to collect the KOM‘s on the local circuits.

KOM is an oxymoron because none of these targets are climbs; he is chasing after the descents.

Seattle has a lot of good descents hidden around, even within the metropolitan area. Mostly because it is a very hilly area to the extent that I can’t find a satisfactory “flat” route to spin on for a recovery day. Which means I’ve learned to “recover” on climbs. Which feels a little bit like bragging. You’re welcome.

As a non-GPS-using rider, I have been very happy to help Carson in his endeavor to bag some tags on the local descents as lead-out monkey and I have to admit it is one hell of a cortisol fix. The descents aren’t even about the KOM anymore, the whole group just attacks one another over and over again all the way down the descent until we reach a stalemate and we start to work together, burning ourselves out and rolling off the front like a worn-out banana peel.

Based on the opening paragraph of this article, I understand that the following claim is unprovable: these descents have put me further into the hurt locker than many climbs I’ve done, barring Haleakala.

Which brings to bear an important reminder: descents are not for recovery. They should hurt every bit as much as the climb, if not more. And if you misjudge a corner, it will hurt a lot more than the climb, possibly for a bit of a while because road rash sucks.

Ride hard on the way up; ride harder over the top, and ride like you stole something on the way down. That is all.

Vive la Vie Velominatus.

// Defining Moments // La Vie Velominatus // Look Pro // Nostalgia

  1. The right-left thing is something I’m truly agnostic about.

    I know my TCR is done the European way and I know my Roberts is done the English way but…

    1. I couldn’t tell you which was which way around and:

    2. I ride them interchangeably and have never had a problem jamming on the wrong brake.

    It’s like changing between driving on the left and right, which I have done quite frequently over the last few years. If you have to think too much about it you’ve got problems.

    Oh and @Frank, my wife also agrees that childbirth is not the worst thing ever because the pain isn’t constant – it comes in waves so you know it will end. She’s had three without anything more than gas and air and I wouldn’t say she has an exceptional pain threshold so I’ll take her word for it.

  2. @Oli

    There was some nebulous justification in that one was supposed to have the strong hand on the rear and the weaker on the front to help prevent over-the-bars accidents in sudden stops, but with the brakes of the day I think this would have been hard to do anyway

    That’s what I thought too. But also saw somewhere on a GCN video on how to descend like a pro, that you need to brake harder on the front tire, which would negate the above. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oLaSA3Bs0M

    Until recently, I did not even know they were wired the other way for the Brits. Scottish coworker told me, he bought a bike in Switzerland but had them rewired.

  3. @bea

    One day I’ll remember not to drink coffee while read here… Coffee everywhere… Again…

    PS I disagree about giving birth being the most painful thing one can do in this live. But I guess that just proves your point…

    my wife says that sciatica was worse than giving birth. I’m not going to dispute, not experienced either.

  4. @ChrisO

    The right-left thing is something I’m truly agnostic about.

    I know my TCR is done the European way and I know my Roberts is done the English way but…

    1. I couldn’t tell you which was which way around and:

    2. I ride them interchangeably and have never had a problem jamming on the wrong brake.

    It’s like changing between driving on the left and right, which I have done quite frequently over the last few years. If you have to think too much about it you’ve got problems.

    Oh and @Frank, my wife also agrees that childbirth is not the worst thing ever because the pain isn’t constant – it comes in waves so you know it will end. She’s had three without anything more than gas and air and I wouldn’t say she has an exceptional pain threshold so I’ll take her word for it.

    I’m also agnostic/ambidextrous. The first time I re-cabled my CAAD8 I realised that I’d get a neater run from the shifter to the front brake if I went Euro. My Supersix hasn’t needed re-cabling yet and I’m slightly scared of the internal cable run to the rear brake (does it have an internal conduit to take the cable through the frame or do I have to thread it through myself?) so it’s still English (which way do the various sheep shagging celtic nations cable their bikes?).

    I don’t think about it when I swap from one bike to the other and it’s never caused me a problem. That said it’s pretty flat round here so there’s rarely any truly hard braking.

    As for driving in Europe, I usually manage one “daddy you’re on the wrong side of the road!!” incident per holiday.

  5. I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

  6. @VbyV

    I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

    There’s one local segment where I have a KOM, and the 2nd to 10th (ish) placed riders all have near identical times and all on the same day, i.e. a group chaingang on the same segment.

    Pride.

  7. @chris

    (which way do the various sheep shagging celtic nations cable their bikes?).

    We don’t use brakes…

  8. @RobSandy

    @RobSandy

    @VbyV

    I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

    There’s one local segment where I have a KOM, and the 2nd to 10th (ish) placed riders all have near identical times and all on the same day, i.e. a group chaingang on the same segment.

    Pride.

    Nice. A solo KOM on a flattish segment. If you rode it on a normal non-TT road rig, even more kudos. Seems like cheating to take a KOM on a TT bike.

  9. @VbyV

    Nice. A solo KOM on a flattish segment. If you rode it on a normal non-TT road rig, even more kudos. Seems like cheating to take a KOM on a TT bike.

    I must be honest, I was riding it on aerobars as TT training.

    But it wasn’t flat – it includes a draggy hill.

    But you’ve shown a very good point about Strava KOM’s – you need to know how they were ridden. It’s why you can only really use Strava to compare yourself to…yourself.

  10. @RobSandy

    @VbyV

    I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

    There’s one local segment where I have a KOM, and the 2nd to 10th (ish) placed riders all have near identical times and all on the same day, i.e. a group chaingang on the same segment.

    Pride.

    I’ve only got a couple of KOMs but having the velominipper on this one is a source of pride. The fact that he’s not that much slower than me at 13 is a source of worry.

  11. @VbyV

    I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

    You follow the pro riders posting their races on Strava? They knock off KOMs all the time. Is it appropriate for group riders to not post their rides for fear of knocking off a KOM? Or should Strava have logic to discern the difference? Anyways, we have a pile of local segment KOMs set by group rides. It just happens. And they’re fun to do too. We also have local individuals that specifically target segments and get ’em on their own. Very strong riders. Those are very cool KOMs to set. And I’ve gone out and blown away, pardon the pun, segments when I had advantage of a particularly strong tail wind and once knocking off a KOM that had been set for years by a group in local race. Why not? It was fun. At end of day, it’s all part of the Strava nonsense.

  12. @RobSandy

    @chris

    (which way do the various sheep shagging celtic nations cable their bikes?).

    We don’t use brakes…

    Sheep make for a soft landing.

  13. @chris

    My 12 yr old daughter is starting to pick off the local QOMs on climbs. How about being the lady on the receiving end of that “uhhh oh” e-mail and see that a 12 yr old hit it? She maybe weighs 45 kilos with 35 being long legs and 5 being lungs. And she loves to ride a bike fast up a hill. She’ll soon be faster than me as sure as the sun’s gonna rise in the east every day. I don’t mind at all. This was her last year attacking the last 25m of our local club 2km up hill TT. Climbing in the drops. Very cool. Tonight is our first TT of 2016 at this climb. Cheers

  14. @Randy C

    @VbyV

    I have a Strava philosophy question. I often see segments on Strava with about 10 guys having almost identical times as the KOM. After this group, the data show a sudden,significant dropoff in time, a drop of 10% or so. I have personally scored a KOM during a group ride by coming through the group and pulling to the end of the segment just because the timing of the paceline worked out that way. This begs the question as to whether a KOM is legitimate when one gets a leadout, from a group or otherwise. It seems like bullshit to say “I am the King” when without the group you couldn’t possibly have done that time for that segment. What do you gents think?

    You follow the pro riders posting their races on Strava? They knock off KOMs all the time. Is it appropriate for group riders to not post their rides for fear of knocking off a KOM? Or should Strava have logic to discern the difference? Anyways, we have a pile of local segment KOMs set by group rides. It just happens. And they’re fun to do too. We also have local individuals that specifically target segments and get ’em on their own. Very strong riders. Those are very cool KOMs to set. And I’ve gone out and blown away, pardon the pun, segments when I had advantage of a particularly strong tail wind and once knocking off a KOM that had been set for years by a group in local race. Why not? It was fun. At end of day, it’s all part of the Strava nonsense.

    Randy,

    I agree Strava is fun, and I record every ride. I was just trying to put some perspective on the KOM thing, the fact that there are different circumstances of rides, like tailwind, group, leadout, etc. As Rob said, you can use it to compare yourself to yourself. Relationships to others’ times have many variables.

    Starva on, and enjoy!

    Tom

  15. @Randy C

    You follow the pro riders posting their races on Strava? They knock off KOMs all the time.

    If you live somewhere which has ever hosted a pro race you have zero chance of ever getting near the KOM for the segments they rode. I happen to. Some of the times on descents (going back to the original article, shock horror!) are truly terrifying.

    It is nice to get a KOM but I know full well the depth of my ability and so if I’ve picked one up it probably means that particular road isn’t ridden very often. Or it’s an odd segment which take in several junctions.

    I got one because my GPS malfunctioned once – it was up a steep hill so it was impossible that I’d actually earned it. It bothered me so much that I made the whole ride private to remove the evidence!

  16. @KogaLover

    It was nebulous back 40 years ago, I meant. That’s a great video, but they’re actually not saying use the front brake harder, they’re saying not to be afraid of it. Big distinction. Anyway, as we all know, different corners require different braking technique. #whateverittakes

  17. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    @chris

    (which way do the various sheep shagging celtic nations cable their bikes?).

    We don’t use brakes…

    Sheep make for a soft landing.

    Especially if you’ve got one installed on the bike before you crash. Standard practice.

  18. @RobSandy

    @Randy C

    You follow the pro riders posting their races on Strava? They knock off KOMs all the time.

    If you live somewhere which has ever hosted a pro race you have zero chance of ever getting near the KOM for the segments they rode. I happen to. Some of the times on descents (going back to the original article, shock horror!) are truly terrifying.

    It is nice to get a KOM but I know full well the depth of my ability and so if I’ve picked one up it probably means that particular road isn’t ridden very often. Or it’s an odd segment which take in several junctions.

    I got one because my GPS malfunctioned once – it was up a steep hill so it was impossible that I’d actually earned it. It bothered me so much that I made the whole ride private to remove the evidence!

    I remember Ted King had some outrageous KOMs on rides during the Tour of California a few years back. He wrote on some that he doubts they can ever be beaten. They are done on closed roads, where the riders can use both lanes on a descent to improve the line, no worries about getting side-swiped at a red light, no need to slow down for the stop signs, etc. Oh yeah, and a pro peloton driving the pace helps too.

  19. @VbyV

    I remember Ted King had some outrageous KOMs on rides during the Tour of California a few years back. He wrote on some that he doubts they can ever be beaten. They are done on closed roads, where the riders can use both lanes on a descent to improve the line, no worries about getting side-swiped at a red light, no need to slow down for the stop signs, etc. Oh yeah, and a pro peloton driving the pace helps too.

    I’m going to post a link to this Strava segment (risky I know), for 2 reasons. Firstly it shows the insane speeds these guys get up to (the top 10 are all from the pro race staged as part of Velothon Wales last year, I think). Average speed of the KOM is over 87kph; my average speed for the same segment is 65 and I was nailing it.

    Oh, and the other reason? The segment is called ‘I Love Boobies’.

    https://www.strava.com/activities/567045806/segments/13747239753

  20. @Randy C

    @chris

    My 12 yr old daughter is starting to pick off the local QOMs on climbs. How about being the lady on the receiving end of that “uhhh oh” e-mail and see that a 12 yr old hit it? She maybe weighs 45 kilos with 35 being long legs and 5 being lungs. And she loves to ride a bike fast up a hill. She’ll soon be faster than me as sure as the sun’s gonna rise in the east every day. I don’t mind at all. This was her last year attacking the last 25m of our local club 2km up hill TT. Climbing in the drops. Very cool. Tonight is our first TT of 2016 at this climb. Cheers

    Your daughter looks like a natural on a bike, climbing in the drops is the epitome of style. It’s very cool when they start riding with the grown ups.

    My lad is quite happy in the B group on our Sunday club runs and is only really held back by not really having developed much power yet. It’ll come and when it does he’ll fly.

  21. Fabian Aru must read this site judging by today’s stage finish!

  22. Well, well, well. Too busy to check in yesterday. Was taking delivery of a timely gift from a fellow Follower. And they arrived on my birthday no less. Sadly, this was my first one without my beloved Prince. RIP.

    Having held a leg and coached the birth of our first child four weeks ago, I am not going anywhere a 2nd one anytime soon…and I had the easy part. Yeesh, what a wild experience that was.

    Teocalli – And Stevie K. should have read this a few weeks ago. Actually, he should have just chilled out and played it conservatively.

  23. @ChrisO

    The right-left thing is something I’m truly agnostic about.

    I know my TCR is done the European way and I know my Roberts is done the English way but…

    1. I couldn’t tell you which was which way around and:

    2. I ride them interchangeably and have never had a problem jamming on the wrong brake.

    It’s like changing between driving on the left and right, which I have done quite frequently over the last few years. If you have to think too much about it you’ve got problems.

    Oh and @Frank, my wife also agrees that childbirth is not the worst thing ever because the pain isn’t constant – it comes in waves so you know it will end. She’s had three without anything more than gas and air and I wouldn’t say she has an exceptional pain threshold so I’ll take her word for it.

    Gas? As in nitrous? None of the local hospitals offer that. Think that along with a few other glaring things, this is somewhere the U.S. lags behind other modern nations.

  24. @Teocalli

    Fabian Aru must read this site judging by today’s stage finish!

    I’m liking the Fabu! Races with guts and panache and looks damn happy when he wins. I’m sick of watching Contador on a podium, only smiling when he does that tired, cliched pistolero move. I’ll give Nibbles and Aru their due, those Scicilians know how to race.

  25. @wiscot

    @Teocalli

    Fabian Aru must read this site judging by today’s stage finish!

    I’m liking the Fabu! Races with guts and panache and looks damn happy when he wins. I’m sick of watching Contador on a podium, only smiling when he does that tired, cliched pistolero move. I’ll give Nibbles and Aru their due, those Scicilians know how to race.

    Aru has an unfair advantage. He has the mouth of a goliath grouper. He’s able to suck in probably 4x the air of a normal human. It’s like doping, but with a mouth.

  26. @chris

    @Randy C

    @chris

    My 12 yr old daughter is starting to pick off the local QOMs on climbs. How about being the lady on the receiving end of that “uhhh oh” e-mail and see that a 12 yr old hit it? She maybe weighs 45 kilos with 35 being long legs and 5 being lungs. And she loves to ride a bike fast up a hill. She’ll soon be faster than me as sure as the sun’s gonna rise in the east every day. I don’t mind at all. This was her last year attacking the last 25m of our local club 2km up hill TT. Climbing in the drops. Very cool. Tonight is our first TT of 2016 at this climb. Cheers

    Your daughter looks like a natural on a bike, climbing in the drops is the epitome of style.

    That’s funny. When I saw that picture, the first thing I thought was, ” Geez, that kid has style!” Great work.

  27. Ride hard on the way up; ride harder over the top, and ride like you stole something on the way down.

    I was once stopped by the Po Po in the hills of the East Bay – right in the middle of a flaming hot descent – because they thought I was literally riding like I stole something. I felt bad for the poor guy in the back seat of the cop car who said “nah… not mine… let’s keep looking,” and kinda glad they were taking the time and effort to find a guy’s stolen steed… but none of it was salve for my anger at being pulled over by a patrol car while in the best segment of a screaming descent. First, because it ruined a moment of La Volupte; and second, because it turned out they were NOT, in fact, pulling me over for speeding.

  28. @Ron

    Gas? As in nitrous? None of the local hospitals offer that. Think that along with a few other glaring things, this is somewhere the U.S. lags behind other modern nations.

    Of course not! Who wouldn’t rather bend a pregnant woman over and poke her in the spine with a 12 or 14G needle, right in that sub-millimeter space between the meninges and spinal chord? Duh!

  29. @fignons barber

    That’s the young lady that took one look at your Cyfac and said, “I want that bike”! She’s never read the rules. Doesn’t know they exist. Yet, she lives/demonstrates them. She most certainly knows a cool bike when she sees one. Endeavors with special attn looking right for the job. And knows what it means about not getting easier just going faster. Though just maybe she likes her dog more than her bike…

    She PR’d the TT btw tonight and promptly set a goal for one second better than my PR.

    Meanwhile, a young man on our local high school Mtn Bike team I coach knocked off another one of my KOMs earlier today. Maybe the young dude just digs knocking off the coach’s KOMs ’cause I swear he looks to be targeting ’em off one after another ?!? What a cool cat.

    Cheers

  30. @litvi

    @Ron

    Gas? As in nitrous? None of the local hospitals offer that. Think that along with a few other glaring things, this is somewhere the U.S. lags behind other modern nations.

    Of course not! Who wouldn’t rather bend a pregnant woman over and poke her in the spine with a 12 or 14G needle, right in that sub-millimeter space between the meninges and spinal chord? Duh!

    Yes nitrous – it’s cheaper, easier to manage, less invasive, fewer risks and quicker to wear off. Very much the first choice unless you really want an epidural, although private hospitals tend to go more quickly for the epidural and caesarian options.

  31. @Oli

    @DVMR

    I don’t really know why, but when I started in the 70s most right-handed riders worldwide were right-rear/left-front. The opposite was known as “Italian-style” for reasons unknown, but generally (but not always wtf?) utilised by the Mosers and Saronnis of the peloton.

    There was some nebulous justification in that one was supposed to have the strong hand on the rear and the weaker on the front to help prevent over-the-bars accidents in sudden stops, but with the brakes of the day I think this would have been hard to do anyway.

    When I got my first bike it came right-rear so that’s what I used, and as I gradually became aware of proper racing bike set-up I set mine from photos of Eddy Merckx, getting the loops out of the top of the lever just so and perfectly even, and I’ve never bothered trying it the other way…this has made for some interesting times test riding client’s machines or borrowing other people’s bikes, but luckily only one ever OTB.

    Then there’s cross where it’s left-rear to allow last second braking before dismounts. But they’re savages…

  32. @ChrisO

    @litvi

    @Ron

    Gas? As in nitrous? None of the local hospitals offer that. Think that along with a few other glaring things, this is somewhere the U.S. lags behind other modern nations.

    Of course not! Who wouldn’t rather bend a pregnant woman over and poke her in the spine with a 12 or 14G needle, right in that sub-millimeter space between the meninges and spinal chord? Duh!

    Yes nitrous – it’s cheaper, easier to manage, less invasive, fewer risks and quicker to wear off. Very much the first choice unless you really want an epidural, although private hospitals tend to go more quickly for the epidural and caesarian options.

    Yep, we learned about it in birth class and would have liked it as an option, but none of the local hospitals offer it. My VMH wanted to do it as natural as possible, unfortunately she needed an epidural after 14 hours of active contractions and no dilation.

    litvi – Oh man, the anesthesiologist was definitely a Type A person and seemed quite full of himself. I guess when you either save someone from a lot of pain, or kill them, you develop a unique personality.

  33. @Ron.

    litvi – Oh man, the anesthesiologist was definitely a Type A person and seemed quite full of himself. I guess when you either save someone from a lot of pain, or kill them, you develop a unique personality.

    Haha, I swear when I had my hip screw put in the anaesthetist nearly clapped his hands in glee that I was his youngest hip patient all year (it was December 30 so a record unlikely to be beaten) and he could give me a general not an epidural.

    Still didn’t stop me going through the most intense pain experience I can possibly imagine – properly transcendental. Give me childbirth any day.

  34. Yikes, that doesn’t sound like much fun. Even with all my sporting injuries and broken bones…the worst pain I ever experienced was a tooth infection. Man, anything nerve related is insane, especially when you swear you can feel it from your toes to your head.

  35. @Oli

    These articles are really going downhill, Frank.

    Damn, that is good. Strong work, Oli!

  36. @Oli

    @DVMR

    I don’t really know why, but when I started in the 70s most right-handed riders worldwide were right-rear/left-front. The opposite was known as “Italian-style” for reasons unknown, but generally (but not always wtf?) utilised by the Mosers and Saronnis of the peloton.

    There was some nebulous justification in that one was supposed to have the strong hand on the rear and the weaker on the front to help prevent over-the-bars accidents in sudden stops, but with the brakes of the day I think this would have been hard to do anyway.

    When I got my first bike it came right-rear so that’s what I used, and as I gradually became aware of proper racing bike set-up I set mine from photos of Eddy Merckx, getting the loops out of the top of the lever just so and perfectly even, and I’ve never bothered trying it the other way…this has made for some interesting times test riding client’s machines or borrowing other people’s bikes, but luckily only one ever OTB.

    I have also heard justification that ‘they’ wanted you to have your strongest hand on the front brake when you took your other hand off the bars to indicate a turn into a road on the same side that you are on. I.e. left turn in UK and antipodes, right turn in US. I get the feeling no one in particular really decided?

    Something just occurred to me. Aside from the fact even my bike made in a right/front left/rear country, the rear brake internal routing is still on the left side of the frame, so would look much better/bend much less if it was cabled with the rear brake on the left. With the rear brake on the right, no matter what you do, the cable is forced against the headtube, whereas if it was the other way, you could build enough slack that it never touched, or only touched when turning right.

    Secondly, brake calipers are obviously designed for a better left front cable routing. Calipers being what they are, the manufacturers could have designed them either way (just like having the drivetrain on the left, could have gone either way), but they obviously designed them for a gentler cable bend going into the ferrule port on the right side when the lever is on the left.

    Maybe there is an opening for SRAM/Shimano/Campag to design an opposite routed front brake caliper? Double their sales? Ha

    I’m anal and even I don’t notice a problem, but you know, this industry and the customers being the way they are, someone would say they needed it!

  37. Too much Throw Down?

  38. @Ron

    Yikes, that doesn’t sound like much fun. Even with all my sporting injuries and broken bones…the worst pain I ever experienced was a tooth infection. Man, anything nerve related is insane, especially when you swear you can feel it from your toes to your head.

    When I say transcendental I really mean that. It was more than bodily pain.

    I was in a void, like space – it wasn’t me as a body but just a small dot of white light. And the only other thing in the void was a massive orange light, and that was pain.

    I had no concept of body and no concept of time.

    All that existed was me and pain. It was the only thing that had ever existed or would exist, without end.

    It was fucking terrifying.

    I don’t know when this happened or how long it lasted. It could have been during the operation while they were drilling holes in my femur or it could have been while I was coming out from the general. It might have lasted minutes or milli-seconds.

    Apparently as I was coming out of the general I was very distressed, so much that they asked Sophie to come in to the recovery room instead of waiting outside as normal. I remember that but it was ‘only’ bodily pain in my leg. Like the worst leg-cramp I’ve ever had times 1000. It was awful but at least I had a sense that it would end.

    So, contractions… meh.

  39. @Beers

    Secondly, brake calipers are obviously designed for a better left front cable routing. Calipers being what they are, the manufacturers could have designed them either way (just like having the drivetrain on the left, could have gone either way), but they obviously designed them for a gentler cable bend going into the ferrule port on the right side when the lever is on the left.

    I don’t think this would be true. I think – like drivetrains being on the right – that it was most likely just a matter of a. engineering/design/manufacturing decision unrelated to the frame. Remember Universal and Campagnolo sidepulls were designed by Italians where the majority of users would have been right/front!

  40. @ChrisO

    Well that doesn’t sound like something you’ll ever forget! An incredible description of pain. Wow.

  41. To come back to going downhill fast..

    I concluded today that the two Giros Nibbles won, he did it by forcing his rivals to crash. Remember Wiggins crashing repeatedly when Nibbles attacked on those fast, wet descents in ’13? And then the same again this year?

    Also his Lombardia win was like that. Everyone knew he was going to attack over the top, and everyone was right there on his wheel, and no one could do a damn thing about it.

    Obviously he can climb a little bit too.

  42. @RobSandy

    @RobSandy

    @bea

    One day I’ll remember not to drink coffee while read here… Coffee everywhere… Again…

    PS I disagree about giving birth being the most painful thing one can do in this live. But I guess that just proves your point…

    my wife says that sciatica was worse than giving birth. I’m not going to dispute, not experienced either.

    While I have never given birth, I have passed a minute kidney stone. The sensation was akin to a lightning strike in the genitalia. I have known women that have both given birth and passed kidney stones, and they would take childbirth any day.

  43. @The Grande Fondue

    To come back to going downhill fast..

    I concluded today that the two Giros Nibbles won, he did it by forcing his rivals to crash. Remember Wiggins crashing repeatedly when Nibbles attacked on those fast, wet descents in ’13? And then the same again this year?

    Also his Lombardia win was like that. Everyone knew he was going to attack over the top, and everyone was right there on his wheel, and no one could do a damn thing about it.

    Obviously he can climb a little bit too.

    Not to mention Nibali’s TdF win then Contador crashed on a descent trying to catch him.

    In my opinion descending is an under appreciated aspect of racing. The best descender I can recall is Paolo Savoldelli, who was nicknamed Il Falco for his falcon like swoops down mountainsides. His descending ability won him at least one of his two Giro titles (I believe it was 2005). After having been dropped on a climb and losing the virtual lead, he made up enough time on the descent to save the Maglia Rosa by 28 seconds.

  44. @Rick

    Careful about mentioning Paolo Savoldelli around here lol, Frank doesn’t like him.

  45. @Oli

    @Rick

    Careful about mentioning Paolo Savoldelli around here lol, Frank doesn’t like him.

    Haha, thanks for the heads up and sorry if I offended anyone. Is there a list somewhere of approved or not approved cyclist?

    I was on the Champs Elysees one year chatting with Marty Jemison. Marty mentioned what a beautiful rider someone was. When a pro like Marty notices, it is high praise indeed.

  46. @Rick

    No need to apologise! Hopefully someone can chuck up a link (I can’t find it!) that will clear up that comment, which was much more a dig at Frank than you.

  47. @Oli

    @Rick

    No need to apologise! Hopefully someone can chuck up a link (I can’t find it!) that will clear up that comment, which was much more a dig at Frank than you.

    Maybe this will work:

    http://www.velominati.com/racing/sabotaging-the-saboteur-paulo-ran-me-down-but-the-dutch-say-i-punched-him/

  48. @ErikdR

    @Oli

    @Rick

    No need to apologise! Hopefully someone can chuck up a link (I can’t find it!) that will clear up that comment, which was much more a dig at Frank than you.

    Maybe this will work:

    http://www.velominati.com/racing/sabotaging-the-saboteur-paulo-ran-me-down-but-the-dutch-say-i-punched-him/

    Wow! What a story. Thanks for digging up the link.

  49. @Rick

    You’re welcome.

  50. @ErikdR

    Thanks mate, that’s the one – you’re the man!

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar