Yes and yes @photos:Tim de Waele/Corbis and CyclingWeekly

Anatomy of a Photos: This Is How It’s Done

by / / 166 posts

Before we move on to the last Monument of the season, let’s reflect on what happened in Richmond. My deeply held fears of the American organizers making a mess of things were unrealized. The two cobbled climbs were spectacles and the resulting road races were pretty damn fine.

Personally, I don’t think the Worlds should ever end up in a bunch sprint. Sprinters should have their chance but the race should be so tough that even a flat course ends up in a fractured gasp for the line. The women’s finish was not a field sprint. Lizzy Armitstead led from the bottom of the last hill and made sure no one got past her for very long. Anna VDB was there but she was not going to win this one. Armitstead was probably the strongest/fastest in her field and kept it together to prove that.

Peter Sagan won from kilometers out, gaining time with each corner. He might not have been the strongest or fastest but he was most definitely the smartest. He sat in the field the whole race and then jumped everyone with a move that won the day.

Neither winner had a strong team for support. When it comes down to the final kilometers, it’s all legs, brains and heart.

It will be a pleasure seeing the rainbow stripes on these two for the next year.

// Anatomy of a Photo // Racing

  1. @the Engine

    “The mutual respect between reptiles one…” OK, now let’s hear it, we can all use a laugh ;-D

  2. @chuckp

    f you stand in one place long enough, the world will come to you … on bikes.

    Great review!

  3. @Oli

    @Barracuda

    @sthilzy

    Thanks for the kind words guys. Glad you enjoyed the reading and pics. Being there was absolutely awesome. Close to a once-in-a-lifetime experience in the U.S., but pretty much happens all the time in Europe.

  4. @mouse

    @the Engine

    @chris

    @Oli

    Hey, I used to spend heaps more time here. It suited me really well at a time in my life (immediate aftermath of separation and divorce) that I needed to feel part of a community. It was pretty awesome at doing that.

    I liked the fact that there was a group of like minded people who love cycling, love the history of cycling and could laugh at themselves and others. (mostly others).

    Just fining a bit more so these days that a bit of preachyness (is that a word??) has set in and it gives me the shits a bit.

    But, you’re quite right @Oli: it is what it is.

    Curious what my story was @the Engine. Trust it was one where I kept my pants on.

    As long as the preachyness is fun and tongue-in-cheek, it’s all good. It’s when it’s actually “serious” that makes me wonder if people have truly lost their marbles. BTW, if you do FB check out the Steel is Real forum. Some of those guys are just off the deep end. Lots of (ignorant) carbon fiber hate.

  5. This.

  6. @chuckp

    Having now seen a picture of Sagan riding a camel looking cool, I can go home happy.

    Thanks all.

  7. You know something, I think Sagan is going to have a LOT of fun being world champ.

  8. @wiscot

    You know something, I think Sagan is going to have a LOT of fun being world champ.

    And we will have a lot of fun because of him.

  9. He may not be able to wear black shorts, but at least he’s wearing a black helmet.

  10. Trying to embed a Tweet so this may end up just being a bunch of gibberish. URL in case embed doesn’t work.

    https://twitter.com/petosagan/status/652155243006857218

    Sagan has both panache and class.

  11. @chuckp

    This.

    will have to coerce that camel to sprint

  12. @chuckp

    @Oli

    @Barracuda

    @sthilzy

    Thanks for the kind words guys. Glad you enjoyed the reading and pics. Being there was absolutely awesome. Close to a once-in-a-lifetime experience in the U.S., but pretty much happens all the time in Europe.

    Thought exactly the same thing when we drove to Geelong and camped in our camper trailer in a caravan park for the Worlds. As luck would have it, our site was right next to the road just before the climb. Amazing experience sitting out the front of the camper in deck chairs with beers in hand watching the worlds best fly past. Hopping over fence every morning and riding the course prior to the pro’s everyday was an added bonus.

  13. @mouse, @chris

    The world is full of people who loved a little indie band and then hated the band for the crime of becoming popular, which is something I don’t understand in the slightest, assuming you liked the band for their music.

    @Mouse, ignoring the fact that you contradict yourself several times, and @Chris – this isn’t the first time I’ve heard this, and you’re not the first community member to leave. Ultimately, Velominati isn’t any of those things you describe – those things you believe are missing are just things you saw in what we do like meaning you might find in a painting. To that point, I get many kind notes from people who are newer to the site who express happiness at finding exactly what you describe to be missing.

    We didn’t build Velominati to be a popular site or a community, we just started writing about the things we love (we have always held firm to certain views – particularly on aesthetics – and maintained a strict (ir)reverence for the history and culture of Cycling). And it appealed to you, the readers, for whatever reason. The community is something we’ve helped foster and we’ve put mechanisms in place to promote its growth, but it has only ever come from you, the readers, and it hinges on the blend of voices that comes from those who decide to speak up for whatever reason. (And is usually driven by some degree of narcissism.)

    I find it very interesting, then, that instead of repaying the community for what they gave you by sticking around and trying to help shape and influence the spirit that brought you here in the first place, that you instead leave the conversation and consider yourself to be above it all. (Also probably driven by some degree of narcissism.)

    @the Engine

    Well, it got me back racing – like actual racing on a road with numbers on my back.

    And it took my fat arse over Paris Roubaix, Die Ronde…(frankly most of Flanders) several times.

    And a gravel race in ‘Murica.

    And an orange and black CX bike with a lion and a cog on it.

    I’ve also made actual friends in multiple continents.

    And @mouse once told a story so good I use it at dinner parties when I’m drunk.

    And next year – well there’s an announcement coming.

    Do I really care if the world champion wears black shorts? Well I’m not going to die in a ditch over it but it does look better.

    You’re my boy, Blue!

    @wiscot

    The way I see it there a lot of serious shit going on in the world. Some we can control, most we cannot. This site is a wee safe haven for some fun and pedantry and a place to vent our feelings on a sport we love. I’d say it’s quite educational at times and trolls are thankfully rare.

    Look at a lot of forums out there – the bile and ignorance on view is incredible. For the most part, the postings on here are well-behaved and mannerly. If you don’t like it, there are millions of other websites to go look at. If you visit regularly you’ll see names come and go but there’s a pretty hard core of posters. That’s called a community and I’m happy to be a member.

    Does it matter in the grand scheme of things whether Sagan wears white or black shorts? Of course not. Does it matter that someone with a media platform expresses his point of view on a terrible crisis in the middle east and Europe and maybe brings some attention to it? Yes it does. Too many sports superstars avoid expressing some kind of opinion on anything for fear of pissing off sponsors and fans. I hope Sagan’s English improves dramatically so he can express himself more articulately. And for anyone whop says “who cares what Sagan thinks?” I say “I care because he spoke from the heart unlike many of the mendacious bunch of liars who are currently running for president.”

    You, my good sir, are onto it.

  14. @frank

    Yep, all good. We’re all narcissists to a degree. I accept that. When I first came to this site, I found validation and that was a wonderful thing.

    I have little doubt that the kind notes you get from others springs from just that. I recall doing something similar in my early days, though not in the form of an email but a post.

    You have built a marvellous community here. Something you should be proud of. I get that you have little control over the flame wars that sometimes erupt, I get that you write primarily about things that interest you now and in the past. You clearly get an amazing response from a very diverse group. Again, kudos to you and the rest of the Keepers.

    And @wiscot is dead right. The bile on other forums is largely missing here. It’s a credit to the intelligence that most people bring to this site.

    I suppose what I’m meaning to say concerning the difficulty I’m having with engaging now is that I feel that a pedagogy has developed around a perception of the past. I understand the reverence that people have for Lemond and Hinault and Super Record and steel frames and gumwalls. I know. I was there, racing as a youngster. I had all those things.

    Thing is, I’m still racing, 30 years later and none of that stuff appeals to me anymore. For me, lightweight carbon wheels and frames are awesome. Waaaay better to ride and race on what I was on 20 years ago.

    Now, I recognise that I’m viewing all of this through my personal prism, call it narcissism if you’d like. Interesting that you’ve suggested selfishness on my part for no longer taking part in the conversation and narcissism for thinking I’m above the discussion.

    I claim neither. Just an opposing view. One clearly outside of the pedagogy, and clearly unwelcome.

    So, yeah. There you go.

    Seeya. It’s been fun.

  15. @mouse

    You bring up an interesting point; I also prefer riding my carbon lovefests, and I really only ride deep-section carbon tubulars because I prefer how they ride. My steel frame has downtube shifters and rides like a dream and I’d love a modern steel bike because I like how steel rides, but if I’m doing any serious riding on the bikes I currently own, I prefer one of my carbon bikes. I believe your bikes are chinese-made, and my two favorites are too; and they survived the cobbles of Paris-Roubaix and the gravel of the Heck of the North just fine.

    Holding the traditions of the sport in reverence and embracing modern advances are not contradictory; instead it is precisely what makes this sport so unique and special. We are simultaneously fiercely traditional and pathologically seeking the next innovation. No other sport is like that, and to hold one above the other is an enterprise subject to flow in the currents of our individual mood and taste.

    From what can be considered our mission statement on The Keepers:

    While this particular sport is steeped in tradition, it is also fiercely modern, a fact that serves only to deepen its complexity.

    Anyway, I appreciate the feedback and its a totally fair viewpoint but in the end, I love this community more than I could ever express but if everyone here felt the way you do and you all wandered off, I would still be sitting here writing a few times a week because I love writing about Cycling. In the end, it’s as simple as that.

    I love this community and the spirit it has. But communities are built off the individual voices in chorus. If you don’t like the way it is developing, then chime in and try to help shape it; if you choose to be silent, then don’t be shocked if it turns out to be something you don’t feel a part of.

  16. He’ll be back. They all come back.

  17. @mouse

    Preachy? Lighten up

  18. @Oli

    He’ll be back. They all come back.

    We all lived through Cammogate after all…

  19. @frank

    I love this community and the spirit it has. But communities are built off the individual voices in chorus. If you don’t like the way it is developing, then chime in and try to help shape it; if you choose to be silent, then don’t be shocked if it turns out to be something you don’t feel a part of.

    What goes around comes around. It’s only a phase – even flares made a comeback.

  20. @the Engine

    Damn straight.

  21. I came upon this site about six months ago, and am very happy that I did.. The people who post here have a vast pool of knowledge and experiences, and are generous in their sharing of them. What a pleasant thing to stumble on.

    The people who post here also have a large variety of interests. Some like the history of (and current state of) our Sport, to include riders, teams, races, and courses. Personally, I love this. Others are equipment junkies, and will happily spend hours discoursing on the relative merits of Shimano and Campagnolo gear. This I find less interesting (this is a personal choice and a matter of taste; no judgment intended). I love anything @frank writes about the experience of being a cyclist – the thoughts that cross through your head before, during and after your ride.

    The good news, at the risk of stating the obvious, is that when the conversation goes in a direction that I don’t really care for, I don’t have to read it. I’ll just check back in in a day or two to see what else has been posted. And while I understand the desire to get the UCI to allow black bib shorts, I also think that Peter and Lizzie make the white shorts look damn good.

    The people who post here, from what I can tell, seem to understand that they are the inheritors of a wonderful tradition in our Sport, and to accept the accompanying responsibility to uphold that tradition for its transmission to the next generation. Our Sport is truly fascinating. Its manifest destiny (in my opinion) is to grow in popularity and understanding (at least, in the English speaking world from which I hail). Communities like this are a big part of making that happen. I can only hope that, over time, my contribution to the community is a positive one.

  22. pic from here

  23. @frank

    Thanks @frank. A thoughtful and kind response.

    And, @Oli, you’re probably right. I’ll lurk and chime in when the urge hits.

    Thanks @ThePressure. Imagine you’re the sort of fellow that would plant the last kick to the ribs of a man on the ground, you know. Just to make sure.

  24. @AshburnMike

    Beautifully put!

  25. @AshburnMike

    I came upon this site about six months ago, and am very happy that I did.. The people who post here have a vast pool of knowledge and experiences, and are generous in their sharing of them. What a pleasant thing to stumble on.

    The people who post here also have a large variety of interests. Some like the history of (and current state of) our Sport, to include riders, teams, races, and courses. Personally, I love this. Others are equipment junkies, and will happily spend hours discoursing on the relative merits of Shimano and Campagnolo gear. This I find less interesting (this is a personal choice and a matter of taste; no judgment intended). I love anything @frank writes about the experience of being a cyclist – the thoughts that cross through your head before, during and after your ride.

    The good news, at the risk of stating the obvious, is that when the conversation goes in a direction that I don’t really care for, I don’t have to read it. I’ll just check back in in a day or two to see what else has been posted. And while I understand the desire to get the UCI to allow black bib shorts, I also think that Peter and Lizzie make the white shorts look damn good.

    The people who post here, from what I can tell, seem to understand that they are the inheritors of a wonderful tradition in our Sport, and to accept the accompanying responsibility to uphold that tradition for its transmission to the next generation. Our Sport is truly fascinating. Its manifest destiny (in my opinion) is to grow in popularity and understanding (at least, in the English speaking world from which I hail). Communities like this are a big part of making that happen. I can only hope that, over time, my contribution to the community is a positive one.

    Nice one! And you’re right, it is OUR sport. Many or most of us have raced/are racing/will race. We also own more than one bike, we eat, sleep and breathe OUR sport. We’re not passive observers. We can appreciate what the pros do even if we’ll never emulate it. We enjoy the heritage of the sport as well as what’s happening now.

    And you’re also right that not every article will appeal. Just look at the number of posts. My history articles rarely get more than a couple of dozen replies/quotes. An article on the merits of helmets, sock length or how to tape handlebars gets hundreds. That’s fine (well, not really as it sends me into a deep depression every time, banned emoticon). No-one reads every article in a magazine or newspaper, at Velominati there just 2-3 articles a week. Some you like, some not so much. But stick around and add your ten cents when you feel compelled.

  26. @frank

    @mouse, @chris

    The world is full of people who loved a little indie band and then hated the band for the crime of becoming popular, which is something I don’t understand in the slightest, assuming you liked the band for their music.

    @Mouse, ignoring the fact that you contradict yourself several times, and @Chris – this isn’t the first time I’ve heard this, and you’re not the first community member to leave. Ultimately, Velominati isn’t any of those things you describe – those things you believe are missing are just things you saw in what we do like meaning you might find in a painting. To that point, I get many kind notes from people who are newer to the site who express happiness at finding exactly what you describe to be missing.

    We didn’t build Velominati to be a popular site or a community, we just started writing about the things we love (we have always held firm to certain views – particularly on aesthetics – and maintained a strict (ir)reverence for the history and culture of Cycling). And it appealed to you, the readers, for whatever reason. The community is something we’ve helped foster and we’ve put mechanisms in place to promote its growth, but it has only ever come from you, the readers, and it hinges on the blend of voices that comes from those who decide to speak up for whatever reason. (And is usually driven by some degree of narcissism.)

    I find it very interesting, then, that instead of repaying the community for what they gave you by sticking around and trying to help shape and influence the spirit that brought you here in the first place, that you instead leave the conversation and consider yourself to be above it all. (Also probably driven by some degree of narcissism.)

    The reports of my departure have been greatly exaggerated.

    I missed this until just now. First up I never said that I was leaving or had left. I doubt that I’ll ever do that as Velominati has been an important part of the way in which I see myself as a cyclist and oddly enough there really are a few people on here that I’d consider to be friends.

    I think, maybe, I wasn’t particularly clear and you’ve mistaken my mention of having spent less time on the site recently and that it’d changed with my leaving.

    I’ve been a less frequent participant over the last eighteen months largely due to pressures of a new job.

    As for the change, I wasn’t referring to the article content (which I do read) but a shift/evolution in the feel of the population (the flippant easy banter between Marcus, Minion and Brett and ChrisO’s helmet wars) but you’re probably not wrong when you say “…those things you believe are missing…”

    You won’t get rid of me that easily.

  27. Il Campionissimo. Back when shorts were black.

  28. @chuckp

    Il Campionissimo. Back when shorts were black.

    I love the tag line of “The magazine for the young from 7 to 77”. (At least I think that’s how it translates!)

  29. @Oli

    He’ll be back. They all come back.

    @frank +1 badge me thinks right there !

  30. For those who want Sagan to wear black.

  31. He’ll be back. They all come back.

    Well, after a busy few months moving from Germany to the US (Port Townsend, a couple hours north-west of Seattle), I know I’m back, even if my No.1 is still on its way over. Just been catching up on a few weeks or months worth of posts here and discovering the roads on the Olympic Peninsula.

  32. @KogaLover

    From today’s Cyclingnews.com

    >The decision to match white shorts with the rainbow jersey sparked much debate on social media but the Tinkoff-Saxo team and clothing supplier Sportful had to respect the strict UCI rules governing the design of the rainbow jersey or risk a 10,000 Swiss Franc fine. The rules allow either team issue shorts or white shorts and so Sagan opted for an all-white look rather than combining the standard yellow and blue Tinkoff-Saxo colours.

    Sagan revealed that he is no fan of white shorts and is hoping to add some black panels as soon as possible. The design of the 2016 team kit may also change to help Sagan avoid a fashion disaster next season.

    “The rules about it are strict and all the world is controlled by rules. We’ve got to accept them,” Sagan said. “We’ve asked for permission to have a black inner part of the shorts but we haven’t had a response from the UCI yet.”<

    So true: the Rules about it are strict and all the world is controlled by the Rules

    From Sagan’s FB profile:

    My new 2016 team race kit. Obviously I will wear the rainbow jersey in the next season, but for a little Sagan touch I preferred to change the color of the bib. What do you think?

  33. @Pali65

    Faban=Rule #14

    Well done for him!

  34. @Pali65

    @KogaLover

    From today’s Cyclingnews.com

    >The decision to match white shorts with the rainbow jersey sparked much debate on social media but the Tinkoff-Saxo team and clothing supplier Sportful had to respect the strict UCI rules governing the design of the rainbow jersey or risk a 10,000 Swiss Franc fine. The rules allow either team issue shorts or white shorts and so Sagan opted for an all-white look rather than combining the standard yellow and blue Tinkoff-Saxo colours.

    Sagan revealed that he is no fan of white shorts and is hoping to add some black panels as soon as possible. The design of the 2016 team kit may also change to help Sagan avoid a fashion disaster next season.

    “The rules about it are strict and all the world is controlled by rules. We’ve got to accept them,” Sagan said. “We’ve asked for permission to have a black inner part of the shorts but we haven’t had a response from the UCI yet.”<

    So true: the Rules about it are strict and all the world is controlled by the Rules

    From Sagan’s FB profile:

    My new 2016 team race kit. Obviously I will wear the rainbow jersey in the next season, but for a little Sagan touch I preferred to change the color of the bib. What do you think?

    Great move by Sagan! Hopefully the UCI will just let this issue rest and get on with more important things within the sport. Also, by today’s standards, those are quite short shorts. Mo betta for showing off the guns!

  35. Brilliant!

  36. Peter Sagan and Lizzy Armitstead — Grease!

  37. @emerson

    oldnews.com

  38. @Oli

    I took a look at your website.

  39. @emerson

    lol, good one.

    I was just helpfully pointing out that @sthilzy had just posted that exact clip only two posts above your repeat.

  40. Also, I have no idea where you got Lizzie Armitstead from – that’s his wife Katarina.

  41. @emerson

    I can’t believe it; it’s the 2nd day of the year and I’m in my first stoush already. I’m sorry I was a smartarse; it was totally uncalled for, and I also regret my lame retorts to your excellent reply to said smartarsery.

  42. Ready for season…

    Photo from Sagan’s Facebook page.

  43. @Gianni

    @Jay

    I think Sagan is will kill it. Even in 2012 he was just getting distanced in the Ronde, either Fabs or Boonen were schooling him but he is capable of some Spring Classics and Milan-Sanremo. I could not have been more impressed with his Worlds win. It was genius.

    Sorry, going through old threads here but I completely agree Gianni. And it is important to realize that he is only turning 26 years old tomorrow. If he stays focused and injury free, he could dominate for another 5 to 8 years. And he has already won 4 green jerseys, the Worlds, stage sin the Vuelta and TdF, G-W, placed seond in MSR and RVV, and a shitload of other races either won or podiumed. My fear for him is always that the “life” of fame will outweigh his riding life, kind of like what happened to Ronaldinho in futbol.

  44. @Oli

    @emerson

    I can’t believe it; it’s the 2nd day of the year and I’m in my first stoush already. I’m sorry I was a smartarse; it was totally uncalled for, and I also regret my lame retorts to your excellent reply to said smartarsery.

    Jesus Christ, what the fucks happened??? Somehow we have the brilliant Oli back (yes I was gone for a year and yes, the site always pulls us back in!!! –but, my excuse was purely IT issues) but now he is apologetic for a possibly perceived slight to someone! Good damn, man! You’re like Tigger without his bounce!!! Love you, Mate!!!

  45. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UneS2Uwc6xw

    The only decent scene from a real shit movie (which was such a tragedy as the first two are two of the greatest films ever made in any nation in any genre).

  46. @Buck Rogers

    Haha! Buck, it’s good to be back.

  47. I think I’m a Sagan fanboy!

  48. 4 МВт – самым крупным и дорогм на рынке? Это какой рынок имеется ввиду, “троещина” что ли?
    isabel marant sneakers uk http://www.marantsneaker.com/

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