Product Review: Bont Vaypor and Vaypor XC

Product Review: Bont Vaypor and Vaypor XC

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I have weird feet, apparently. It’s not really something you normally come to realize without asking questions that one rarely has reason to ask. I might have asked them, though, had I ever had any notion that feet don’t always have to hurt in a cycling shoe. Hurt might be a strong word – more like “squished” or “numb”. I’ve also had this weird thing where my feet tend to roll towards the outside of the pedals, as if all the awesome power dispatch from my righteous guns is concentrated on the outside of the foot, which is also the part of my foot that tends to go numb right away.

I say my feet are weird because they are apparently wide but also low in volume. To put it in technical terms, I have flippers for feet. You might think that would make me a good swimmer but my talents where swimming is concerned are more accurately described as “not drowning” than “swimming”. As far as fish’s grace goes, I’m more like the “free candy” fish than one of those sexy colorful fish that swim up in the good water.

Over the years, I’ve ridden in loads of shoes, to varying success. The Sidi Ergo 2 was possibly my favorite shoe, with its sufficiently stiff shoe and the delightful combination of three different kinds of buckles, which always served to fascinate me. The f”iz:ik white R1 is possibly the most beautiful shoe I’ve ever seen and the dead baby kangaroos were wildly supple and comfortable. The problem for me with those was not the width, but the volume; at one point, I had two pairs of insoles in them (at the same time) in an effort to reduce the volume to the point that my feet stopped sliding around whenever I let the cannons off the leash. Sometimes, no matter how badly you want to love a product, you have to recognize the reality that it simply doesn’t work for you, and that was the case for the fi'zi:k line of shoes and me.

Bont shoes caught my attention at the Beijing Olympics and I became immediately fascinated by their approach to making a cycling shoe; fully heat-molded and a toe box designed to allow the foot to spread out into its most natural position. While most shoes are basically designed to constrain the foot in order to hold it in place, Bont takes the approach that a foot is actually very good at finding its most optimal position naturally, and designed their shoe to allow this to happen.

The result is a bit of a funny looking shoe; it doesn’t have the usual pointed toe box we’re used to seeing, but instead continues to expand until it reaches the end of the toes. Basically, it looks like a foot rather than a torpedo. And since feet aren’t shaped like torpedoes, it seems a sensible approach.

Bont also doesn’t fool around when it comes to the construction of the uppers; whereas cycling shoes generally have supple uppers with stiff areas placed strategically about the shoes for buckles and such, Bonts have stiff, unforgiving uppers which are also intended to be heat molded to form to your foot. The idea being that a stiff upper is more efficient than a sloppy one, and you can afford to have an entirely stiff upper when it is shaped precisely to the form of your foot.

Lastly, Bonts soles are also made of completely heat-moldable carbon fiber. I’ve never seen a sole so stiff and thin. The stiff sole is great for power transfer and the thinness of the sole improves pedaling efficiency by bringing the foot closer to the pedal axle. This also has the consequence, however, of requiring the shortest screws that come with your cleats or possibly even specialty short screws if necessary as they can stick out through the sole and poke your foot. Which is uncomfortable, assuming you have feeling in your feet.

I started riding the Bont Vaypors in July and spent about a week experimenting with heat molding them before I got them perfect. But once I got them right, I was absolutely amazed at how good these shoes are. At this point, I can’t imagine going back to a “normal” cycling shoe. In fact, I commuted a day last week in my old Sidis, thinking I’d use them in the wet and save the Bonts for dry weather. Nothing doing, pal – once you’re used to Bonts, there’s no going back.

For one thing, the stiffness of the sole is staggering and the resulting power transfer is amazing. The molded sole and uppers mean I have zero hot spots anywhere in the shoe and the numbness I’ve always experienced has gone away completely. Riding with feeling in my feet is not entirely unpleasant, as it turns out. The shoes have also managed to somehow resolve the pressure distribution in my foot; all the force of the stroke now comes down straight through the ball of the foot and into the pedal, fully supported by the length and width of the entire sole.

I’ve also been riding the Vaypor XC off road, and the shoe is similarly impressive. Bont basically took the Vaypor road shoe, added just a bit of extra padding to the uppers for comfort, and added some rubber grippers to the sole for those pesky occasions when you find yourself running with your bike, which everyone knows should be avoided if at all possible. Personally, I try to ride any climb, but after I crashed and monkey-jacked my chain, I was forced to find alternative means to complete the CX course; I was much more hindered by the broken bike and gash in my knee than I was by the shoe’s performance in a cross-country running application. On the bike, the shoe is nearly indistinguishable from the road shoe in terms of power transfer and pedaling efficiency.

These shoes aren’t for everyone, though; Marko tried a pair of both the road (Vaypor) and off-road (Vaypor XC) shoes and wasn’t able to get them to work for him. G’rilla, on the other hand, had complained on several occasions of a baby’s arm growing from one of his feet which made cycling shoes uncomfortable. The heat molding on Marko’s rejects did the trick for him and initial reports indicate these shoes work very well. You would think that as a courtesy for giving him a pair of shoes he’d not drop me on the hills, but some people simply have no manners.

Fitting & Heat Molding Tips

I had the opportunity to speak with Bont’s CEO, Steven Nemeth, on several occasions to discuss molding the shoes and I’ve outlined my recommendations below. Remember that these are high performance racing shoes and, while they are very comfortable after molding, they are unforgiving and stiff. If you’re looking for something of an evening slipper in your cycling shoe, you may want to pass over the Bonts and see about having a pair of cleats nailed to an old pair of oxfords.

Fitting & heat molding tips (please watch the official video on the Bont site first):

  1. Take out the insoles that came with the shoes. Throw them away because they are useless. Bont is working on making a better insole, but for now fi'zi:k makes the best heat-moldable insole. I have used the Specialized blue foot beds myself and have been very happy with them. Keep that between us; if asked, I will categorically deny using any Specialized product full stop.
  2. Don’t worry about making mistakes, you can re-mold them as many times as you need to or want to.
  3. Ideally, you’d wear the shoes on a ride or two before molding them in order to get a feel for what parts of the shoe need to be worked on most.
  4. If you have particular hot spots, you can use gauze and athletic tape to build out those areas. Typical areas would be the Achilles heel or any protuberances on your feet. Tape the gauze to your foot and put your socks on over it before stepping into the shoes when molding them.
  5. Before chucking the shoes in the oven, remove the cleats.
  6. Don’t chicken out when heating the shoes; you want the soles to become fully pliable; they should be really soft by the time you take them out and put them on.
  7. The sole can be pushed out by as much as a half centimeter; don’t be afraid to push it out to give your foot room in places where you need more. If you need room in the toe box, push the toe box out with the handle-end of a screwdriver.
  8. When the shoes come out, put the new insoles in and put the shoes on. Stand in place, don’t walk around as you may crack the softened carbon in the sole.
  9. The cleat holes are mounted further back on the Bonts than most shoes; keep that in mind when placing your cleat.
  10. Bonts are designed to allow your toes to move, which is almost certainly contrary to the shoes you’re used to. Don’t let this freak you out; take a week to get used to being able to wiggle your toes. Despite this, when the shoes are fitted correctly, they hold your feet firmly in place.
  11. You can use the Bont fit chart for sizing; for me, the sizing transferred directly to Sidi (I wear a 46.5 in both). You should have a little bit of room in the length of the shoe to allow your toes to spread out when dishing out The V.
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// Accessories and Gear // Product Review // Technology

  1. @mcsqueak

    I tried their footbeds and disliked them quite a bit – but I use their “turbo tubes”, mostly because they come pre-talc’ed in a little bag, perfect for stuffing in my middle jersey pocket repair kit.

    I’d be interested in your opinion on those, especially if you run them with Schwalbe Ultremo ZXs. I had two unzip on consecutive days of a stage race, both in the pack, front whilst doing 30kmh, rear whilst doing 50kmh. No potholes, no punctures, they just let go about 150-200mm along a seam. Fortunately neither dumped me onto my face. I’m going over to Conti Supersonic tubes as  I’ve heard lots of good things about them and they’re even lighter than Turbo tubes.

  2. @Deakus

    @Deakus

    @Nate

    @frank

    Is this publication available in ‘Merica?

    O and if you want the trial don’t use the main link they have a trial offer £5 for 3 issues here

    http://www.dennismags.co.uk/cyclist

    No idea if you can do that one internationally ill update if I find out..

    You need to use offer code D1301P to get the special offer..

    Cyclist Magazine is available through the Newsstand on your i-thingy.. for those who can’t get a paper-copy. Great mag, less commercial than most.

  3. That was a great article. I myself is currently using Bont A-two and I have 2 pairs of them in white. It is the only  shoe I can fit in my wide forefoot. Please note that Bont has a wide type for their shoes so better check them out properly. I’m loving it, and it is stiff enough for a enthusiast like me. Vaypor model on the other hand is great, but considering the amount of money to invest in a vaypor, i’d rather get myself a 2 pair of Bont A-two.

  4. Got my Bonts yesterday.  I’ve yet to mount cleats and ride in them yet or mold them, but to @gianni ‘s question from earlier, I can tell that they are going to work for me, straight out of the box.  They feel a little short in length compared to my other shoes and the uppers are certainly way less supple than any other shoe I’ve worn, but the dimensions certainly fit my feet well and in just standing in them for a few minutes the upper started to feel a little more compliant.  I went with the obnoxious red and black Cervelo Test Team version since they were available in my size at a deep discount over the Vaypors and seem to be nearly identical from what I can tell.

    Since the Red Damsels moniker is already taken and denote a shoe made by an Italian cobbler, I think I’ll call these the Scarlet Sheilas

  5. @VeloVita

    Got my Bonts yesterday. I’ve yet to mount cleats and ride in them yet or mold them, but to @gianni ‘s question from earlier, I can tell that they are going to work for me, straight out of the box. They feel a little short in length compared to my other shoes and the uppers are certainly way less supple than any other shoe I’ve worn, but the dimensions certainly fit my feet well and in just standing in them for a few minutes the upper started to feel a little more compliant. I went with the obnoxious red and black Cervelo Test Team version since they were available in my size at a deep discount over the Vaypors and seem to be nearly identical from what I can tell.

    Since the Red Damsels moniker is already taken and denote a shoe made by an Italian cobbler, I think I’ll call these the Scarlet Sheilas

    HOT TOT TOT TOT!

    I’ve been trying to convince Steven to make me an Orange pair. He said something about winning the Tour and him being happy to accomodate…

  6. Speaking of Bont, they are offering 20% off on their entire line as a special Christmas offer:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/exclusive-christmas-offer-from-bont-cycling?ns_campaign=news&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=cyclingnews&ns_linkname=0&ns_fee=0

  7. @frank

    @VeloVita

    Got my Bonts yesterday. I’ve yet to mount cleats and ride in them yet or mold them, but to @gianni ‘s question from earlier, I can tell that they are going to work for me, straight out of the box. They feel a little short in length compared to my other shoes and the uppers are certainly way less supple than any other shoe I’ve worn, but the dimensions certainly fit my feet well and in just standing in them for a few minutes the upper started to feel a little more compliant. I went with the obnoxious red and black Cervelo Test Team version since they were available in my size at a deep discount over the Vaypors and seem to be nearly identical from what I can tell.

    Since the Red Damsels moniker is already taken and denote a shoe made by an Italian cobbler, I think I’ll call these the Scarlet Sheilas

    HOT TOT TOT TOT!

    I’ve been trying to convince Steven to make me an Orange pair. He said something about winning the Tour and he’d be happy to accomodate…

    Want – he’ll sell at least two pairs and I promise not to set mine on fire this time

  8. So after reading this article I did a bit of research and decided to give them a try to see if they’d fit my REALLY wide flippers any better than any others and save me from having to go the custom route. I ordered the size that measured what should have fit my feet. They did not and I reordered in what would be my normal size. So far, no harm, no foul.

    I then contacted Bont to return my first pair. Having read the return policy ahead of time I knew if I had done anything more than try them on while on a soft surface they would be considered used. I also knew I’d be responsible for return shipment. What I was hit with, after I had shipped them back already, was a restocking fee. Apparently if you order online and need to return the afterwards, there is a fee. (I would have much preferred to purchase them from an actual store, but there are only two dealers within 100 miles and neither carries wide sizes) I scoured the website again and could find no mention of this fee anywhere. I asked about it and was simple told, “This is our company refund policy, it does not state on our website.”

    The fee itself is a negligible amount. My only issue here is that no where does it state that there may be a restocking fee. This to me, is rather disingenuous. I’m seriously considering returning the replacement pair when they arrive simple out of principle. I don’t want to bash the company nor am I making any insinuations about the quality of the product (which seemed to be fairly high from what I could tell). This is more of a customer service issue as far as I’m concerned. Does anyone happen to have an actual contact at Bont that can explain this hidden fee?

  9. @MJ Moquin

    So after reading this article I did a bit of research and decided to give them a try to see if they’d fit my REALLY wide flippers any better than any others and save me from having to go the custom route. I ordered the size that measured what should have fit my feet. They did not and I reordered in what would be my normal size. So far, no harm, no foul.

    I then contacted Bont to return my first pair. Having read the return policy ahead of time I knew if I had done anything more than try them on while on a soft surface they would be considered used. I also knew I’d be responsible for return shipment. What I was hit with, after I had shipped them back already, was a restocking fee. Apparently if you order online and need to return the afterwards, there is a fee. (I would have much preferred to purchase them from an actual store, but there are only two dealers within 100 miles and neither carries wide sizes) I scoured the website again and could find no mention of this fee anywhere. I asked about it and was simple told, “This is our company refund policy, it does not state on our website.”

    The fee itself is a negligible amount. My only issue here is that no where does it state that there may be a restocking fee. This to me, is rather disingenuous. I’m seriously considering returning the replacement pair when they arrive simple out of principle. I don’t want to bash the company nor am I making any insinuations about the quality of the product (which seemed to be fairly high from what I could tell). This is more of a customer service issue as far as I’m concerned. Does anyone happen to have an actual contact at Bont that can explain this hidden fee?

    I am pretty sure Frank does and has actually spoken to the MD before….so it is probably worth raising with him….?

  10. @the Engine

    I’ve still yet to mold mine, but you’re scaring me into thinking I’m going open my oven only to find  a molten mess of carbon and  microfiber

  11. @MJ Moquin
    It’s not documented anywhere for you to read, Mr. customer,  but it’s our policy? WTF? Is their product so exclusive and superior that they can afford to be dickheads and completely oblivious to good customer service? These people could learn a thing or twelve from the backcountry.com group of companies…

    Rant mode /off.

  12. @VeloVita

    @the Engine

    I’ve still yet to mold mine, but you’re scaring me into thinking I’m going open my oven only to find a molten mess of carbon and microfiber

    The important thing that nobody tells you is that if you’re using a fan oven keep your shoes away from the fan outlet as there will be a plume of superheated air there. The toe bumper on mine was facing the outlet when I put them in the oven and caught fire (just a little bit mind you) and charred leaving a lovely burnt rubber smell in the kitchen.

    This confirmed to Mrs Engine that I’m a moron who can’t use simple household appliances. The CEO of Bont has read some of the repartee on here and also come to the conclusion that I’m a moron. He wrote in an increasingly well known cycling periodical to the effect that “only two people in the world have ever fucked up the moulding process” and I suspect that what he really meant was “if you set your shoes on fire don’t coming running to me you Pommie half wit”.

    Nothing daunted I’m still of the opinion that my Bonts are shoe porn (don’t search for that statement on Google) and notwithstanding the very fashionable slightly charred look I’ll be acquiring another pair – in the rumoured orange if it ever happens.

  13. @the Engine

    I’ve got a fan in the center rear of my oven and it can either be used in the mode with it on or off.  Judging by your experience I assume I should keep it off.  Regardless, is it a better idea then to keep them with the toes pointed towards the oven door and the heels toward the fan? Or, in either orientation, should I split them and keep them towards the sides of the oven?

  14. @VeloVita

    @the Engine

    I’ve got a fan in the center rear of my oven and it can either be used in the mode with it on or off. Judging by your experience I assume I should keep it off. Regardless, is it a better idea then to keep them with the toes pointed towards the oven door and the heels toward the fan? Or, in either orientation, should I split them and keep them towards the sides of the oven?

    No one’s ever asked me for technical advice on anything before – and there’s probably a reason for this (see previous patronising discussion on chain whip use).

    But seeing as you’ve asked – if the fan’s off as long as they’re sole down I can’t see you going far wrong. Just remember to put your VMH’s baking parchment between the shoes and the oven shelf.

  15. @VeloVita

    @the Engine

    I’ve got a fan in the center rear of my oven and it can either be used in the mode with it on or off. Judging by your experience I assume I should keep it off. Regardless, is it a better idea then to keep them with the toes pointed towards the oven door and the heels toward the fan? Or, in either orientation, should I split them and keep them towards the sides of the oven?

    Bonts. They can be heated in a dryer with a stationary (sweater) rack — very easy to control. Your oven might possibly get way too hot — or not.

  16. Also decided to heat my Bont pair one at a time.

  17. @RedRanger

    I’m training to be a aircraft mechanic. Ill be that guy replacing an engine right before your flight or wiring radios and antennas.

    My advise would be to get your flying in now guys. Me and my class matea are going to be set loose on aviation by the end of the year.

    Sweet! My grandfather was an airline mechanic in NYC & then Long Island after getting out of the Navy. His hard work & what he kindly gifted when he moved on allowed me to buy my Tommasini. You better do a good job or you ain’t gonna have money to leave to your grandkids to buy awesome Italian bikes with!

    Another feller using Endura overshoes in really wet weather (which I haven’t seen in awhile) & DeFeet oversocks when it’s just cold. Both of them have performed nicely for me.

  18. @the Engine

    But seeing as you’ve asked – if the fan’s off as long as they’re sole down I can’t see you going far wrong. Just remember to put your VMH‘s baking parchment between the shoes and the oven shelf.

    My VMH can’t cook for shit and as such its actually MY baking parchment, but I was just going to place them on a cookie sheet so they were on a flat surface.  Bad idea?

  19. I’ve never seen a dryer with a sweater rack on this side of the Atlantic so I’ll assume that’s a US only option. We just dry our plaids on the grass in summer after washing them in urine – in winter we don’t bother because we use the natural lanolin in the wool to provide rudimentary waterproofing.

    Can’t see any advantage to doing them one at a time but then what would I know?

    A cookie sheet would be fine – basically anything flat that’s made to go in an oven that keeps the soles off the bare metal of the shelves.

  20. @the Engine

    Can’t see any advantage to doing them one at a time but then what would I know?

    Reason being (with some reasoning) that you can put only one shoe on at a time.

  21. @unversio

    @the Engine

    Can’t see any advantage to doing them one at a time but then what would I know?

    Reason being (with some reasoning) that you can put only one shoe on at a time.

    I’ve found that I keep putting on shoes until there’s no more feet left to put them on

  22. @the Engine

    @unversio

    @the Engine

    Can’t see any advantage to doing them one at a time but then what would I know?

    Reason being (with some reasoning) that you can put only one shoe on at a time.

    I’ve found that I keep putting on shoes until there’s no more feet left to put them on

    Indeed.

  23. @http://couponmoz.org/

    how on earth do you sign up to this won webpage?! are you a robot?

  24. @http://couponmoz.org/

    If you want to get much from this piece of writing then you have to apply such techniques to your
    won webpage.

    This is not much writing for me to get much from.  I have applied all the techiniques I know including certain tantric activities and dark arts but to no avail….shine a light!  Give guidance, we poor miserable wretches here could do with a giggle!

  25. @http://couponmoz.org/

    All your base are belong to us. Just sayin’…

  26. @CanuckChuck

    @MJ Moquin
    It’s not documented anywhere for you to read, Mr. customer, but it’s our policy? WTF? Is their product so exclusive and superior that they can afford to be dickheads and completely oblivious to good customer service? These people could learn a thing or twelve from the backcountry.com group of companies…

    Rant mode /off.

    The story continues…

    So my shoes were delivered to the warehouse on 17/01/13 and I’m STILL fighting with them for my refund. WTF?! This company has, hands down, the WORST customer service I’ve ever dealt with. And I’ve dealt with Bank of America, Citizens Bank and Verizon! I can safely say that I will never purchase another product from them.

  27. Since I’m disinclined to research it for myself, can someone tell me how these things are sized? If I usually wear a US 9.5 and have medium-wide feet, do I want 42.5?

  28. After about 60km in my Bonts, my right toes go numb.

    It didn’t stop me from finishing 120km, but it would be nice to fix.

    I don’t know if it’s numb from the cold or from poor blood flow.

    Should I re-mold my Bonts in the oven or try something else? They are comfortable otherwise.

  29. @G’rilla

    After about 60km in my Bonts, my right toes go numb.

    It didn’t stop me from finishing 120km, but it would be nice to fix.

    I don’t know if it’s numb from the cold or from poor blood flow.

    Should I re-mold my Bonts in the oven or try something else? They are comfortable otherwise.

    Re mold – don’t forget to take the cleats off. You can push the toe box out a little with a screwdriver handle.

  30. @the Engine Thanks, I’ll try that.

  31. Are Bont’s the only shoes with moldable soles, specifically in the arch?  Shimano has moldable shoes, but I think it is just the uppers?

  32. r1’s are heat moldable.  at least they were last year.

  33. My old pair of Lakes had moldable insoles and the shoes also could be molded.  Good luck finding anyone that carries the brand these days though.

  34. @roger

    for the previous r3s, I was not impressed with the in-store proprietary Easy-Bake Oven sole molding that the LBS provided. I couldn’t get the needed high arch support so I swapped them out for some generic Spesh green inserts.  I feel so dirty.

  35. @G’rilla

    After about 60km in my Bonts, my right toes go numb.

    It didn’t stop me from finishing 120km, but it would be nice to fix.

    I don’t know if it’s numb from the cold or from poor blood flow.

    Should I re-mold my Bonts in the oven or try something else? They are comfortable otherwise.

    You might also consider how tight your shoes are.  Over tightening can easily be done.

  36. Fizik insoles are, Bonts are all around moldable.

    @xyxax

    @roger

    for the previous r3s, I was not impressed with the in-store proprietary Easy-Bake Oven sole molding that the LBS provided. I couldn’t get the needed high arch support so I swapped them out for some generic Spesh green inserts. I feel so dirty.

    I have the green inserts in my current shoe, not sure they are working.  Maybe the lesser arched ones would.

  37. @DerHoggz

    fi’zi:k insoles are, Bonts are all around moldable.

    @xyxax

    @roger

    for the previous r3s, I was not impressed with the in-store proprietary Easy-Bake Oven sole molding that the LBS provided. I couldn’t get the needed high arch support so I swapped them out for some generic Spesh green inserts. I feel so dirty.

    I have the green inserts in my current shoe, not sure they are working. Maybe the lesser arched ones would.

    I had blue and went to green and was able to ride 14 hours in Vermont with the feet being the least of my worries, though that may have been true even if they’d been ground into bloody stumps.  I realize the Specialized footbeds are a bit generic but an inexpensive way to gauge what might work if one needs something more, um, specialized.  You probably know Steve Hogg, who is not a fan of moldable footbeds, and it makes some sense: http://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/blog/2011/02/foot-correction-part-1-arch-support/

    PS: my feet have slowly been going numb over a few years (too far away from my brain?) and are at the same time excruciatingly sensitive, so it’s something I perhaps am overly focused on.  #over-sharing

  38. Where are shoes heading in the looks department?


    Taylor Phinney’s Giro’s at Paris Roubaix

  39. I’ve had a bit of a shoe catastrophe lately.

    I went to change the cleats on my Bonts and found that the Look screws and the thread on my Bonts had rusted together.

    We do sweat a lot out here of course – to the extent that in summer the sweat actually drips through the cleats – and I should have loosened them and greased them more frequently. But I was afraid to change anything after having a lot of problems with cleat position and  my knees so I left them in place.

    I would like to replace with the Bonts but as this is an unbudgeted item and I’ve just spent a load of money respraying and upgrading my Roberts I think it will have to be something from the Sale bin.

  40. Update on that – found some nice Gaerne shoes (Carbon Mythos) at half price – anyone know how they are sized, especially in comparison to say Mavic or Bont ?

    I’m normally a 9.5 in UK sizing.

  41. @sthilzy personally I love them, especially the old footy boot style wrap around lacing!

    @ChrisO don’t know mate, haven’t used them although from memory one of the boys in Cali might be in Gaernes.

  42. @titirangisi

    @G’rilla

    After about 60km in my Bonts, my right toes go numb.

    It didn’t stop me from finishing 120km, but it would be nice to fix.

    I don’t know if it’s numb from the cold or from poor blood flow.

    Should I re-mold my Bonts in the oven or try something else? They are comfortable otherwise.

    You might also consider how tight your shoes are. Over tightening can easily be done.

    Second that – now I’ve had them for a few thousand k’s I know that the Bonts can be over-tightened all too easily for a long ride. That snug fit at two hours can be an instrument of medieval torture at six. I know in running I used to go up a shoe size in a marathon and although the pounding is less on the bike your feet will change size and shape subtly through the day – given a millimetre can make the difference between ecstasy and agony I’ve gotten in to the habit of adjusting the fastening every hour or so – even if its just letting it out and re-tightening for a couple of seconds – seems to make all the difference.

  43. @Fausto

    @mcsqueak

    I tried their footbeds and disliked them quite a bit – but I use their “turbo tubes”, mostly because they come pre-talc’ed in a little bag, perfect for stuffing in my middle jersey pocket repair kit.

    I’d be interested in your opinion on those, especially if you run them with Schwalbe Ultremo ZXs. I had two unzip on consecutive days of a stage race, both in the pack, front whilst doing 30kmh, rear whilst doing 50kmh. No potholes, no punctures, they just let go about 150-200mm along a seam. Fortunately neither dumped me onto my face. I’m going over to Conti Supersonic tubes as I’ve heard lots of good things about them and they’re even lighter than Turbo tubes.

    I havevZX s on my American Classics. 2000km. No probs. occasional string of cotton, but nothing else. I keep pressure UP!! Prevents sidewall tears.

  44. Reading the posts above on shoes, I have come to the realization that all cyclist’s shoes should have clearly printed somewhere the patronymic:TGIF

    This,   in translation, mans: “toes go in first.”

  45. @DocBrian

    Reading the posts above on shoes, I have come to the realization that all cyclist’s shoes should have clearly printed somewhere the patronymic:TGIF

    This, in translation, mans: “toes go in first.”

    Da,n that spell spoiler. Not meant to put “patronymic,” but “acronym.”

  46. @Mikael Liddy

    @sthilzy personally I love them, especially the old footy boot style wrap around lacing!

    “Old footy boot style” Seeing how Thor is on the same team as Phinney, wonder if Thor may rock up with Phinney’s boots and Cadel’s birthday present he gave him?

  47. @DerHoggz There are aftermarket moldable insoles called eSoles but they are pretty expensive.  I got some Giro insoles last year with different arch inserts you can swap in for varying arch heights.  They work well for me and were a major improvement over the shit Sidi insoles or green superfeet.

  48. @Nate, @DerHoggz

    I have the eSoles – they came with my defunct Lakes.  Arch is the standard placement for “walking” shoes, and for my foot the extreme arch “green” insole from Specialized still works better.  I guess just like every other contact point, it depends mostly on the velominatus if a given product will work.

  49. I realized my problem with the Spesh greens is the arch on the insole is too far forward.  Did the eSoles have the arch farther back then?

  50. @DerHoggz

    I found the eSoles to be more of a standard arch support and not enough, even after molding, but I have very high arches.  The Spesh greens feel more like a golf ball right behind the ball of my foot instead of the traditional support over the entire area of the arch.  Strange to walk in, great for my feet when riding.  You could also try a smaller size in the Spesh to move the arch back some.

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