The Rides

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The Ride. It is the cathedral of our sport, where we worship at the altar of the Man with the Hammer. It is the end to our means. Indeed, The Bike may be the central tool to our sport, but to turn the pedals is to experience the sensation of freedom, of flight. It is all for The Ride.

The world is overflowing with small, twisty roads that capture our collective imagination as cyclists. We spend our lifetimes searching out the best routes and rides; we pore over maps, we share with our fellow disciples, we talk to non-cycling locals all in pursuit of the Perfect Ride.

The Rides is devoted entirely to the best routes and rides around the world. Some are races or cyclosportives, others feature in the Classics and stages of The Great Races, while others still are little-known gems, discovered through careful meditation on The V. Be warned: these rides are not your average Sunday Afternoon spin; these rides are the best and most difficult rides in the word – they represent the rites of passage into La Vie Velominatus. It is to be taken for granted that these rides require loads of Rule #5, many of them Rule #10, and all of them are best enjoyed in Rule #9 conditions. They have been shared by you, the community. The Rides also features articles devoted to the greatest rides and providess a forum for sharing other rides for discussion.

If you’d like to submit a ride or an article about your own favorite ride, please feel free to send it to us and we’ll do our best to work with you to include it.

Haleakala

Category: Grimpeur / Distance: 56km / Location: Paia, Maui, Hawaii, USA

haleakala

Haleakala is simultaneously the longest paved continuous climb in the world as well as the shortest ascent from sea level to 10,000 feet in the world. Though not terribly steep, this is a long, grinding climb that will reduce a strong rider to a whimpering lump.

To put the effort in perspective, this climb is 60km long a an average of 6% with two pitches as steep as 17%. That translates to somewhere between 3 or more hours of nonstop climbing, usually in Maui’s direct heat and often into a whipping headwind that spins around into a headwind no matter which direction the switchbacks take you.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/50412514

Liege-Bastogne-Liege

Category: Rouleur / Distance: 265 / Location: Liege, Belgium

lbl

Liege-Bastogne-Liege is not only La Doyenne, the oldest of the Classics, but also represents perhaps the most demanding course in cycling. The 280 km, 3000m vertical route starts with an easy ride out from Liege to Bastogne which lulls riders into a false sense of security; the hills are frequent, but none of them terribly demanding. Into Bastogne, and the story changes on the way back to Liege with 9 categorized climbs in the second half, including the fearsome Côte de la Redoute and the Côte de Saint-Nicolas.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/58053308/

Paris-Roubaix

Category: Hardman / Distance: 265 / Location: Compiégne, France

paris-roubaix

L’enfur du Nord. The Hell of The North. The Queen of the Classics. This isn’t a ride over the stones from your local brick-paved roads. You think climbs are what make a ride tough? We’ve got news for you: this is the hardest ride on the planet and it boasts a maximum elevation of 55 meters. These are vicious, brutal stones; the kind that will stretch each kilometer to their full length, the kind of stones that you will feel long after the rattling of the bars has stopped. These stones will change you. Forever.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/58052610/

Guide: Pavé Cycling Classics

Mortirolo/Gavia Loop

Category: Grimpeur / Distance: 115km / Location: Bormio, Italy / Contributor: Joe

The Mortirolo is perhaps the most feared pass in Western Europe, and the Gavia the most storied. Given their proximity to each other, its a wonder why this isn’t the most talked-about ride in Italy. Maybe it is; its impossible to say without being Italian. The loop nature of this ride makes it feasible as a solo escapade, but any ride with the kind of stats this one bears – 3200 meters ascended in 115 kilometers including the viscously steep Mortirolo – is best enjoyed with a riding partner or support car.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/59027020/

200 on 100

Category: Grimpeur / Distance: 330km / Location: Vernon, VT / Contributor: cdelinks

“Dumptruck of Awesome” has become the catch-phrase associated with this brutally hard, yet strikingly beautiful 330 kilometer (200 mile) ride down Vermont Route 100.  This ride was made popular during the summer of 2011 when Ted King, Tim Johnson, and a local amateur cyclist, Ryan Kelly, documented this ride on film. The ride starts on the Canadian border and finishes on the Massachusetts border.  With over 2500 meters of climbing on this 330 kilometer ride, you will need to pack a few lunches to get through this one.  Do this ride in the Fall, and the foliage might be beautiful enough to distract you from the horrible pain you will most certainly suffer.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/58052808/

De Ronde Van West Portlandia

Category: Grimpeur / Distance: 76km / Location: Portland, Oregon, USA

A ride that officially “never happens” each spring, this 76 km route charts a course through Portland’s West Hills, paying homage to the European Spring Classics. Approximately 1,800 meters of paved and unpaved climbs are spread throughout the course, with several sections reaching grades of over 20%. More information can be found at Ronde PDX.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/15276210

Seattle Master Urban Ride

Category: Rouleur / Distance: 130km / Location: Seattle, Washington, USA

seattleronde

This is perhaps the most challenging urban route in Seattle, hitting three of the big hills that define Seattle’s topography. The route starts and ends on Phinney Ridge, but hits the climbs of Interlaken and Alder Street/Lake Dell Drive on its way to Mercer Island, before coming back to hit Queen Anne and Magnolia, weaving its way up each of these hills as many times as possible via the steepest route available before the finale to the north via Golden Gardens, Blue Ridge Drive, and Carkeek Park. Panoramic views of the Cascades, Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, The Olympic Penninsula and Puget Sound makes this a standout Urban ride.

Route: http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/57732282

  1. @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    …This made him the first cyclist since Merckx to take the Giro-Tour double in the same year (and joined Coppi and Anquetil as the only cyclists still to have done so – and it’s looking like this will remain the case for the time being…)

    You can add Roche, Indurain and Pantani to that list.




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  2. @mulebeatsdrums

    NB: My last post sounded like I was really down on @chuckp’s Frozen Saddles thing. I’m really not! I think it’s a fantastic way to do a competition; much better than the shitshow from my old club that I described.

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    No worries. I didn’t read your post as such. Freezing saddles is gloriously stupid/stupidly glorious. That’s the whole point! :-) So much better than all the people Zwifting IMHO.




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  3. @RobSandy

    Me and my 6 year old have got into the habit of taking our bikes out in the evenings, just to ride around the block. Just because. It’s wonderful.

    Indeed! I enjoy my “rides to nowhere” in the ‘hood. It’s a reminder of why you rode your bike when you were a kid. Riding for the pure fun of it.




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  4. @Steve Trice

    @chuckp

    That’s a great basis for a competition, Chuck. I really must get round to resurrecting my MTB and doing some shorter rides in really bad weather, just for the hell (and joy) of it.

    The majority (vast majority?) of people who play Freezing Saddles are just “regular” riders. Many of them commuters. But there are also some “ironman” riders who rack up big miles (like several thousand during the competition). A lot of socializing is involved and it’s fun to meet and sometimes ride with all these different people. Actually, it’s a hoot!




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  5. @Steve Trice

    @RobSandy

    @mulebeatsdrums

    What y’all and the rest of my Velominati brethren will appreciate about Freezing Saddles is that everyone who participates — regardless of what kind of rider they are and what kind of bike they ride — is, by definition, a badass. For the most part, they are “regular folks” doing #9 rides. Outdoors braving the elements instead of “comfortably” indoors Zwifting. But not necessarily because they’re training for anything. But because they love riding their bikes.




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  6. @MangoDave

    @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    …This made him the first cyclist since Merckx to take the Giro-Tour double in the same year (and joined Coppi and Anquetil as the only cyclists still to have done so – and it’s looking like this will remain the case for the time being…)

    You can add Roche, Indurain and Pantani to that list.

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    Oops.




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  7. @chuckp

    @RobSandy

    Me and my 6 year old have got into the habit of taking our bikes out in the evenings, just to ride around the block. Just because. It’s wonderful.

    Indeed! I enjoy my “rides to nowhere” in the ‘hood. It’s a reminder of why you rode your bike when you were a kid. Riding for the pure fun of it.




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    Getting my little boy to like riding just for the fun of riding, either us both on our own bikes or us both on the tandem is something I’ve been hoping for. Of course, as he’s a stubborn little so-and-so he only went for it when it felt like his idea, not mine.

    He’s currently learning to ride out of the saddle, it’s awesome to watch.




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  8. @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @mulebeatsdrums

    That photos never gets old. The gear ratio he’s pushing makes me want to cry.

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    For me, that’s the Nr#2 to that incredible photo of the prophet with his bike. The more I look at it the more I find you look at. I mean, just look at his fucking socks.

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    It’s not just the carefully folded-over socks, it’s the early skinsuit, devoid of logos bar the Le Coq Sportif emblem. The crochet-back gloves are old school as are the all black, all leather shoes.Also, no computer, no sunnies,

    What’s funny is that he’s going as areo as he can with the frame, the cables, the clothing, the bidon, but riding what look to be 32 spoke wheels. In other iterations of this bike, the brakes were mounted behind the fork and in front of the seat stays.




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    Don’t forget the awesome headband channelling unadulterated badassery directly from his brain to his mighty guns…

    Were the 32 spoke wheels for stiffness?

    By the way, was I correct in my assessment of this photo, in that it was one of the last 2 ITT’s of the 1982 Tour, and he won it?




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  9. @chuckp

    There’s a lot of people sitting on Zwift instead of sitting on their arses or simply waiting for the weather to get better – it’s not like they all would have been outside.

    And a lot of others would have been inside on trainers anyway going slowly insane.

    That’s great that you’re outside riding but why do you have to put down someone else?

    Having broken my hip on black ice I don’t really want to do it again. But if you want to make comparisons… I’ve still done 770km outside in the last month, as well as 20 hours on Zwift.

    Being able to use Zwift makes me also ride more outside. It”s not a zero sum game.




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  10. @ChrisO

    Agree with this. I can’t imagine myself using Zwift (I don’t train enough indoors to make it worthwhile) I don’t have a problem with it per se. The only problem I have with it is people talking about it a lot and people who jump on Zwift the second there is a bit of mist in the air.

    I also wonder if we’re going to start seeing strong Zwift riders turning up in road races with loads of horsepower but no knowledge of group riding.

    And for indoor training I can see it’s the way forwards. There’s a guy in our club who rides TTs and he does 7-8 hours training time, indoors, every week – all following trainer road. And doesn’t ride outside. Ok it might might you fast but the mind numbing tedium of that would put me off cycling.




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  11. @ChrisO

    @chuckp

    There’s a lot of people sitting on Zwift instead of sitting on their arses or simply waiting for the weather to get better – it’s not like they all would have been outside.

    And a lot of others would have been inside on trainers anyway going slowly insane.

    That’s great that you’re outside riding but why do you have to put down someone else?

    Having broken my hip on black ice I don’t really want to do it again. But if you want to make comparisons… I’ve still done 770km outside in the last month, as well as 20 hours on Zwift.

    Being able to use Zwift makes me also ride more outside. It”s not a zero sum game.

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    ChrisO – Sorry if my comments were interpreted as a put down. Not intended. Meant as a fun poke. I have a lot of friends who Zwift (or turbo training indoors). They are getting great workouts. And riding when they otherwise wouldn’t. That’s better that sitting around doing nothing. Although I’m also a big fan of sitting around doing nothing and drinking a good glass of wine. :-) I make fun of my Zwift friends and they make fun of me. It’s all good fun between mates … until someone loses an eye, of course. Zwift away, my friend! Many happy miles … inside and out. Cheers!




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  12. ChrisO – Those of you who Zwift or turbo train indoors are getting “real” workouts. All I’m doing is “real” bike rides riding my bike around outdoors. They’re two different things. I would be one of those going slowly insane if I did the latter. That said, I do have a spin bike if I want to actually do a real indoor bike workout. But mostly I can’t be bothered because I’m well past the point of having any goals or aspirations riding … other than to ride to ride for the fun of riding. So while others feel compelled to train (and good for them for doing that), I don’t.




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  13. ChrisO – Correction – Not latter, former, i.e., I’d go insane if I did indoor riding. I’d rather putz around outdoors. Perfectly fine with doing nothing indoors.




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  14. @RobSandy

    @ChrisO

    Agree with this. I can’t imagine myself using Zwift (I don’t train enough indoors to make it worthwhile) I don’t have a problem with it per se. The only problem I have with it is people talking about it a lot and people who jump on Zwift the second there is a bit of mist in the air.

    I also wonder if we’re going to start seeing strong Zwift riders turning up in road races with loads of horsepower but no knowledge of group riding.

    And for indoor training I can see it’s the way forwards. There’s a guy in our club who rides TTs and he does 7-8 hours training time, indoors, every week – all following trainer road. And doesn’t ride outside. Ok it might might you fast but the mind numbing tedium of that would put me off cycling.

    I get why people Zwift and why it’s fun for them. And good training. But it would be nice if they actual bike riders too. Who know how to ride a bike and love to ride and ride with others. I’m assuming most are. But we’ve become so much a “virtual” society where people don’t connect and relate to each other in person. Zwift is just another example of that.




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  15. @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @mulebeatsdrums

    That photos never gets old. The gear ratio he’s pushing makes me want to cry.

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    For me, that’s the Nr#2 to that incredible photo of the prophet with his bike. The more I look at it the more I find you look at. I mean, just look at his fucking socks.

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    It’s not just the carefully folded-over socks, it’s the early skinsuit, devoid of logos bar the Le Coq Sportif emblem. The crochet-back gloves are old school as are the all black, all leather shoes.Also, no computer, no sunnies,

    What’s funny is that he’s going as areo as he can with the frame, the cables, the clothing, the bidon, but riding what look to be 32 spoke wheels. In other iterations of this bike, the brakes were mounted behind the fork and in front of the seat stays.

    0

    Don’t forget the awesome headband channelling unadulterated badassery directly from his brain to his mighty guns…

    Were the 32 spoke wheels for stiffness?

    By the way, was I correct in my assessment of this photo, in that it was one of the last 2 ITT’s of the 1982 Tour, and he won it?

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    I’d have to do a bit more research at home, but it’s either Stage 14 or stage 19 of the 1982 Tour. The first ITT (Stage 11) was won by Gerrie Kneteman with Hinault 2nd at 18 seconds. Phil Anderson was in yellow. Stage 14 (Martigues, 32.5 kms) and Stage 19 (St. Priest, 48 kms) were both won by Hinault, in yellow, with Van Houwelingen and Kneteman second respectively.

    Hinault won the overall by 6.21 from Zoetemelk.

    The headband? Hinault makes it look good – not an easy thing to do. 32 spoke wheels woul;d have been standard equipment in the early 80s, but they’d have had good tubulars on them. IOt was early days inn the aero game back then!




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  16. @wiscot

    As part of Renault they were the first team to use a wind tunnel around rider position and flattened tube shapes on the frames.




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  17. @chuckp

    I get why people Zwift and why it’s fun for them. And good training. But it would be nice if they actual bike riders too. Who know how to ride a bike and love to ride and ride with others. I’m assuming most are. But we’ve become so much a “virtual” society where people don’t connect and relate to each other in person. Zwift is just another example of that.

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    Again I have to disagree and suggest you are seeing things in a far too binary way.

    First because this place is (maybe ‘was’) a good example of a ‘virtual’ community which people used to make connections in person. Look at the number of cogals and group rides that have happened, and still do.

    And Zwift is no different. In a virtual sense it means I have people in contact with me from all around the world because I ride with them virtually or they take part in some of the events that I organise and then connect with me on Facebook or Strava. That’s broadening my world, not narrowing it. And like Velominati there are real-world connections from Zwift – real-world rides, real-world events (exhibitions etc) even real-world competitions in the style of e-gaming events.

    It’s not mutually exclusive.




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  18. @ChrisO

    It’s not mutually exclusive.

    I get it. I think you’re reading too much into my comments. I’m not a Zwift hater.




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  19. Speaking of outdoor rides, I will be in Hawaii next week – Big Island, near Kona. Has anyone ever done some riding in the area for recommendations? I’m tagging along with the wife’s work trip, so it’s not a cycling destination, per se, and I’m not planning on bringing my bike. I would consider a rental if there are good options.

    I won’t have time to jump over to Maui to harass @Gianni or tackle the volcano, sadly.




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  20. @MangoDave

    Speaking of outdoor rides, I will be in Hawaii next week – Big Island, near Kona. Has anyone ever done some riding in the area for recommendations? I’m tagging along with the wife’s work trip, so it’s not a cycling destination, per se, and I’m not planning on bringing my bike. I would consider a rental if there are good options.

    I won’t have time to jump over to Maui to harass @Gianni or tackle the volcano, sadly.

    Well, you could always ride the Ironman course if you want a lesson in how to ride in island tradewinds.

    BTW, outdoor rides in Hawaii while the rest of us are enduring winter weather don’t count as real rides. Those are weenie rides for wuss riders.

    P.S. I spent all my summers in Hawaii when I was a kid. My grandparents lived there (my mom grew up in Hawaii) and my parents would send me there. Rough, huh?




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  21. @chuckp

    @MangoDave

    Speaking of outdoor rides, I will be in Hawaii next week – Big Island, near Kona. Has anyone ever done some riding in the area for recommendations? I’m tagging along with the wife’s work trip, so it’s not a cycling destination, per se, and I’m not planning on bringing my bike. I would consider a rental if there are good options.

    I won’t have time to jump over to Maui to harass @Gianni or tackle the volcano, sadly.

    Well, you could always ride the Ironman course if you want a lesson in how to ride in island tradewinds.

    BTW, outdoor rides in Hawaii while the rest of us are enduring winter weather don’t count as real rides. Those are weenie rides for wuss riders.

    P.S. I spent all my summers in Hawaii when I was a kid. My grandparents lived there (my mom grew up in Hawaii) and my parents would send me there. Rough, huh?

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    Ha, that does sound rough! I don’t know much about the Ironman course, but from what I’ve seen it doesn’t look like much – mostly flat and open, right? Not that I would complain.

    You may have noticed I’m not jumping in about your winter riding conversation, I might get beaten with frozen mini pumps wielded in anger. I live in Phoenix, it’s 75F today. It’s still hard to find time to ride this time of year, though. It’s dark by the time I’m off work, and it’s almost suicide to battle traffic on a bike then. I like to ride the mountain trails during the week – no car traffic, but I still have to deal with masses of clueless hikers wearing ear buds. Longer road rides on the weekends.

    I get my share of Rule #9 riding in the summer, the heat doesn’t keep me off the bikes.




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  22. @MangoDave

    Ha, that does sound rough! I don’t know much about the Ironman course, but from what I’ve seen it doesn’t look like much – mostly flat and open, right? Not that I would complain.

    According to Strava, the Ironman Kona bike course is 111.9 miles (so ~55 miles out and ~55 miles back) with … wait for it … 4,896 feet of elevation game. So hardly flat. Definitely open. If it’s a typical day on the Big Island, completely windswept.




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  23. @Teocalli

    @wiscot

    As part of Renault they were the first team to use a wind tunnel around rider position and flattened tube shapes on the frames.

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    There’s a nice pic in this site that shows Hinault going aero: http://www.gitaneusa.com/racing.asp




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  25. @Teocalli

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    Good lord, be still my beating heart! That lower pic of Hinault, is there an image that shows a more perfect position of style, grace and power as well as the melding of man and machine? Sublime.

    BTW, just picked up a copy of Herbie Sykes’ Maglia Rosa book. What a great book! Dipped in last night. Overall it’s great bar a couple (so far) shocking errors that (considering it’s the second edition) should have been caught. One is the word breaks instead of brakes, and the most egregious is a pic of Hinault where one of Visentini should be! Talk about two different riders!




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  26. @RobSandy

    I also wonder if we’re going to start seeing strong Zwift riders turning up in road races with loads of horsepower but no knowledge of group riding.

    This is the thing that troubles me about indoor training. There were a couple of guys when I was at uni who were very strong, very fast, and would crash far too frequently to be put down to bad luck.

    As someone who has always been heavier, and has hereditary knee issues (they’ve creaked since I was 15, it’s gross), I was never going to be the strongest or fastest rider, despite being in the prime age bracket (I’m 27), so when I started Cycling I focussed as much on handling skills as general fitness. Ended up coming in useful in group rides, where others have bumped into me (or on one occasion got their bars hooked around mine) and we’ve managed to stay upright.

    That said, I have a turbo trainer that I use every so often, although I don’t use Zwift – I tend to just put a film on. Things with subtitles work well as you don’t need to hear them over the whirring of the rollers!




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  27. @mulebeatsdrums

    @RobSandy

    I also wonder if we’re going to start seeing strong Zwift riders turning up in road races with loads of horsepower but no knowledge of group riding.

    This is the thing that troubles me about indoor training. There were a couple of guys when I was at uni who were very strong, very fast, and would crash far too frequently to be put down to bad luck.

    As someone who has always been heavier, and has hereditary knee issues (they’ve creaked since I was 15, it’s gross), I was never going to be the strongest or fastest rider, despite being in the prime age bracket (I’m 27), so when I started Cycling I focussed as much on handling skills as general fitness. Ended up coming in useful in group rides, where others have bumped into me (or on one occasion got their bars hooked around mine) and we’ve managed to stay upright.

    That said, I have a turbo trainer that I use every so often, although I don’t use Zwift – I tend to just put a film on. Things with subtitles work well as you don’t need to hear them over the whirring of the rollers!

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    Well, they’ll fit right into Cat 4 won’t they.

    Entry level races have always been notorious for that, it’s hardly new.

    And most of the strong guys on Zwift are either real-life strong racers or people who’ve decided not to ride on the road for whatever reason. Most of the others will go the ‘normal’ route through sportives or clubs – I haven’t heard of anyone jumping straight into racing.

    In any case I find the most dangerous people on the road are the ones who are at their limit. If someone’s got good horsepower then they’re more likely to be in control.

    I’ve got one guy doing my Masters series who’s in his late 60s and seriously kicks everyone’s butt – people started saying he was cheating but it turns out he’s a 7 time national TT champion in Austria and he weighs like 100 kg. He’s got legs like Robert Forstermann.




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  28. @Teocalli

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    anybody else notice how far ahead of KOPS Hinault’s position is, here?




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  29. @ChrisO

    @mulebeatsdrums

    @RobSandy

    I also wonder if we’re going to start seeing strong Zwift riders turning up in road races with loads of horsepower but no knowledge of group riding.

    This is the thing that troubles me about indoor training. There were a couple of guys when I was at uni who were very strong, very fast, and would crash far too frequently to be put down to bad luck.

    As someone who has always been heavier, and has hereditary knee issues (they’ve creaked since I was 15, it’s gross), I was never going to be the strongest or fastest rider, despite being in the prime age bracket (I’m 27), so when I started Cycling I focussed as much on handling skills as general fitness. Ended up coming in useful in group rides, where others have bumped into me (or on one occasion got their bars hooked around mine) and we’ve managed to stay upright.

    That said, I have a turbo trainer that I use every so often, although I don’t use Zwift – I tend to just put a film on. Things with subtitles work well as you don’t need to hear them over the whirring of the rollers!

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    Well, they’ll fit right into Cat 4 won’t they.

    Entry level races have always been notorious for that, it’s hardly new.

    And most of the strong guys on Zwift are either real-life strong racers or people who’ve decided not to ride on the road for whatever reason. Most of the others will go the ‘normal’ route through sportives or clubs – I haven’t heard of anyone jumping straight into racing.

    In any case I find the most dangerous people on the road are the ones who are at their limit. If someone’s got good horsepower then they’re more likely to be in control.

    I’ve got one guy doing my Masters series who’s in his late 60s and seriously kicks everyone’s butt – people started saying he was cheating but it turns out he’s a 7 time national TT champion in Austria and he weighs like 100 kg. He’s got legs like Robert Forstermann.




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    there’s a buncha nutcases on the local scene these last few years that seemingly do nothing but crash out group rides. they stare at their meters and don’t watch where they’re going. i do one group ride a week, because i’m lucky enough to know a few sane people that don’t forget where they are. we’re all old, of course. lol




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  30. @Cary

    @Teocalli

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    anybody else notice how far ahead of KOPS Hinault’s position is, here?

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    Talk about being punched in the guts!

    Tried to keep the red line parallel with the crank to see KOPS…..




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  31. Surely that should be down through the spindle if you are trying to show KOPS (Knee Over Pedal Spindle) but it was set with cranks level – which anyway is a fairly debunked idea these days anyway………..




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  32. @Teocalli

    Surely that should be down through the spindle if you are trying to show KOPS (Knee Over Pedal Spindle) but it was set with cranks level – which anyway is a fairly debunked idea these days anyway………..

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    He may well be slide quite a long way forwards on the saddle too, i.e. on the rivet.




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  33. That Cycles Citane bike is awfully sweet. Think by chance that this is a photo of a TT effort? The bike, with the ovalized seat and down tubes, looks like a more modern alloy bike assembled w/hydroformed tubes. Even the top tube looks a little like that on my CAADs (?). And how about that cassette on the back ? And the front brake tucked in behind the fork. The bidon. Just all looks like TT kinda effort. Think maybe he’s running a 54/53 up front w/11-16 in back?? Hah. Cool. Cheers all




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  34. @Teocalli

    THIS CHAIN IS SAD BECAUSE IT’S BEEN LEFT ON THE SMALL RING




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  35. @Randy C

    That Cycles Citane bike is awfully sweet. Think by chance that this is a photo of a TT effort? The bike, with the ovalized seat and down tubes, looks like a more modern alloy bike assembled w/hydroformed tubes. Even the top tube looks a little like that on my CAADs (?). And how about that cassette on the back ? And the front brake tucked in behind the fork. The bidon. Just all looks like TT kinda effort. Think maybe he’s running a 54/53 up front w/11-16 in back?? Hah. Cool. Cheers all

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    It is a TT. This was one of the first frames to start building aero into the sign courtesy of the Renault wind tunnels as a result of Renault becoming their sponsor.




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  36. @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    THIS CHAIN IS SAD BECAUSE IT’S BEEN LEFT ON THE SMALL RING

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    I thought you were supposed to leave the chain in the small ring and small end of the cassette…

    … just not take any photographs of it.




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  37. @Teocalli

    @Randy C

    That Cycles Citane bike is awfully sweet. Think by chance that this is a photo of a TT effort? The bike, with the ovalized seat and down tubes, looks like a more modern alloy bike assembled w/hydroformed tubes. Even the top tube looks a little like that on my CAADs (?). And how about that cassette on the back ? And the front brake tucked in behind the fork. The bidon. Just all looks like TT kinda effort. Think maybe he’s running a 54/53 up front w/11-16 in back?? Hah. Cool. Cheers all

    0

    It is a TT. This was one of the first frames to start building aero into the sign courtesy of the Renault wind tunnels as a result of Renault becoming their sponsor.

    0

    You might dig this interview I was trying to find more info on that bike and stumbled on this at Gitane site.




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  38. and from the same site, describing this bike, is this cool or what:




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  39. @Randy C

    and from the same site, describing this bike, is this cool or what:

    0

    Nice! but wouldn’t want to be turning left quickly!




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  40. @Teocalli

    Surely that should be down through the spindle if you are trying to show KOPS (Knee Over Pedal Spindle) but it was set with cranks level – which anyway is a fairly debunked idea these days anyway………..

    0

    that’s kinda my point. a bike fit, now, will often start there as a point of reference, but hardly anybody finishes there. my bike fitter moved my saddle forward 1-1/2cm, and it was instantly worth 5kph.




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  41. @sthilzy

    @Randy C

    and from the same site, describing this bike, is this cool or what:

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    Nice! but wouldn’t want to be turning left quickly!

    0

    Sorry to piss on this lovely parade, but as gorgeous as that Gitane bike is, I don’t think it’s 100% legit. I’m pretty sure that for most of Hinault’s career he rode Campagnolo (or to a lesser extent Stronglight and Simplex – both French companies). To the best of my knowledge, he never rode Shimano. Moser rode Shimano in the early 80s and got no end of shit for doing so.




    0
  42. Just to follow up with an example. In the TT pic, the left hand crank has an unmistakable groove running down the center – characteristic of Campagnolo Super Record. The picture of the bike with Dura Ace has smooth cranks with no groove.




    1
  43. >>> The example pictured was used as a display at a New Yprk City bicycle show in the early 1980’s, and is in near mint condition <<< fwiw…

    and >>> catalog specs call for the dura ace. The team itself probably would have used campy except for the hubs which are mavic because of the 80mm front hub <<<

    Anywho, I just couldn’t resist learning more about this uber cool bike. Check out the derailleur cable tucking in to the down tube.

    It’s all about the bike.




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  44. @Randy C

    >>> The example pictured was used as a display at a New Yprk City bicycle show in the early 1980’s, and is in near mint condition <<< fwiw…

    and >>> catalog specs call for the dura ace. The team itself probably would have used campy except for the hubs which are mavic because of the 80mm front hub <<<

    Anywho, I just couldn’t resist learning more about this uber cool bike. Check out the derailleur cable tucking in to the down tube.

    It’s all about the bike.

    0

    Hey there! It was just me being pedantic. I know Gitane made replicas available and maybe this was a “team Replica” bike?

    And hey, it’s given us something new to talk about. I wonder if the spring classics will be ignored this year or will that bring Frank out from wherever he’s hiding?




    0
  45. Hows this for a finish at the Women’s Tour Down Under?!

    https://giant.gfycat.com/GrayDiligentEquestrian.webm




    0
  46. Spring Classics are the Best !




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  47. @sthilzy

    Hows this for a finish at the Women’s Tour Down Under?!

    https://giant.gfycat.com/GrayDiligentEquestrian.webm

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    Well, the best you can say is that the truck sure didn’t get stuck . . .




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  48. Oh Balls. Apparently there is an Election in Italy on the same weekend as Strada Bianche and it (or at least the Granfondo) may be cancelled or moved. Flights and hotel already booked along with a few thousand others I guess. So their FB Page starting to pile up………




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  49. @Teocalli

    Oh Balls. Apparently there is an Election in Italy on the same weekend as Strada Bianche and it (or at least the Granfondo) may be cancelled or moved. Flights and hotel already booked along with a few thousand others I guess. So their FB Page starting to pile up………

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    Really? How inconsiderate. It’s not as if elections in Italy are rarities, like every 4 or 5 years. You’d think they’d look at a calendar first!




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  50. @wiscot

    @Teocalli

    Oh Balls. Apparently there is an Election in Italy on the same weekend as Strada Bianche and it (or at least the Granfondo) may be cancelled or moved. Flights and hotel already booked along with a few thousand others I guess. So their FB Page starting to pile up………

    0

    Really? How inconsiderate. It’s not as if elections in Italy are rarities, like every 4 or 5 years. You’d think they’d look at a calendar first!

    0

    Yeah – apparently they knew when they opened registrations! There are people I’ve seen who have booked travel from as far away as Brazil.




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