The Bikes

by / 14006 posts

The Bike. It is the central tool in pursuit of our craft. A Velominatus meticulously maintains their bicycles and adorns them with the essential, yet minimal, accoutrement. The Rules specify the principles of good taste in configuration and setup of our machines, but within those principles lies almost infinite room for personal taste.

It seems in some ways like a kind of Stockholm Syndrome, the way we honor our machines. We love them to a point that lies well beyond obsession. Upon these machines upon we endure endless suffering, but also find an unending pleasure. The rhythm, the harmony between rider and machine, the outdoors, the wind in our faces and air in our lungs.

The Bikes is devoted entirely to our machines. Ours, The Keepers, and yours, the Community. It features articles devoted to our bikes, and proves a forum for uploading photos of your own machines for discussion. We will be harsh, but fair; this is a place to enforce and enhance our observation of The Rules.

If you’d like to submit an article about your own beloved bike, please feel free to send it to us and we’ll do our best to work with you to include it.

  • Festum Prophetae: Waiting for the Hour The Machine of the HourEveryone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. – Mike Tyson The one thing everyone should always plan for is that however well-conceived a program might be, things will never go to plan. The high level plan for my Festum Prophetae Hour Ride was as follows: Have a custom Hour Bike built by Don Walker. Because reasons. Reasons like custom ...
  • The Aesthete’s Choice: Boyaux Naturel Going Phantom Aero on the FMB naturals. Photo: Rouleur.ccTradition and innovation are the two opposing edges that cut our evolution through the fabric of our sport. Tradition grounds us, while innovation ensures we advance ever forward. The problem with tradition is that it is comforting and familiar, often shielding us from adopting newer, improved practices and technology. The trouble with innovation is that its freshness can blind ...
  • On Rule #12: The Bike #1 Paradox This helps make a bike special.The only parents who proclaim to have a favorite child are the ones who have only one; all the other ones pretend they don’t have a favorite because they are each “different and special in their own way”. It’s complete bollocks, that, and we all know every parent does in fact have a favorite, but we ...
  • In Memoriam: The Funny Bike The FunnybikeSummer, it appears, has been snatched abruptly from Seattle’s grasp, like a squeak toy from a puppy’s mouth. A week ago, we were setting record temperatures which were sadly playing their role in producing the worst wildfire season the state has ever seen. On the plus side, I haven’t ridden my Nine Bike in so long both its ...
  • Guest Article: Testing Rule #12 The MasterIf Rule #12 does not smolder deep in your soul, you might not be a Velominatus. I’ll still be riffling through bike magazine porn, from the inevitable wheelchair, in the old folks home. Some of us have hidden new bikes from our better halves. Every known bit of subterfuge has been employed to downplay the ...
  1. That’s a sweet build and that groupset is stunning. Picture that against the correct background and it would look like a pair of wheels with a floating groupset.

  2. @Ron

    The downside: at least one of them is in need of a cleaning, some tuning, a repair.

    So true… Sometimes there’s even a little time afterward to go for a ride. Even so, I still enjoy working on them.

  3. @Kay_Jay

    Beautiful but confusing: is it retro, NOS, new? Given toeclips? Just came back from Eroica, and removed the toeclips that I had to put back on, hence…

    What chain is that?

  4. @Randy C

    @ChrisO

    Why the set back seat post? Dang if that’s not a great question.

    Most likely it’s because the Thomson posts don’t have an offset head at the seat rails, so the post itself needs to provide the setback to be in a similar position compared to a typical road seatpost. I have a straight tubed Thomson on one of my mountain bikes, and it definitely puts you in a more forward position.

  5. @KogaLover

    @Kay_Jay

    Beautiful but confusing: is it retro, NOS, new? Given toeclips? Just came back from Eroica, and removed the toeclips that I had to put back on, hence…

    What chain is that?

    It’s probably a KMC. In fact come to think of it, it’s surprising that @frank does not use one…..

  6. @smithers

    @KogaLover

    Here’s a sibling of yours thinking he’s a mountain bike. Don’t worry about the pose scratching the frame, it already has plenty of scuffs (the R5 frame evidently flicks paint if you so much as sneeze on it)

  7. @Teocalli

    @KogaLover

    Sorry about the delay. Its a 1988 Colnago Carbon Volo (the first Colnago carbon monocoque frame apparently), original paint with original owners signature still on top tube (Ottaviano Frugeri – his son still runs Cicli Frugeri) and the chain is a Fossati (Everest) chain. Thanks for the interest.

  8. I love @Oli‘s Bianchis (Bianchia?) . I love celeste. I love the classic lines. I really, really dig the Specialissima. Oh do I. I just saw pic’s at maybe was Velosnooze of some new aero Bianchis at tour in celeste. Yuck. Celeste and aero doesn’t work.

    Come to think of it, sea foam green and a fender strat or tele are perfect. Classic lines. But, sea foam green sure as heck wouldn’t work on a Les Paul. Doesn’t work on C aero bikes either. My opinion. Cheers all

  9. Damn. My LBS had a break-in yesterday and the owner had their custom Sarto stolen. Anyone in the UK please spread in your community that this is a stolen bike. It is a custom build and custom paint job so is a unique bike.

  10. @Teocalli

    That’s a gorgeous no expense spared bicycle!

  11. @Randy C

    @Teocalli

    That’s a gorgeous no expense spared bicycle!

    So you can understand how pi$$ed off the owner is to have had it stolen.

  12. @Teocalli

    @Randy C

    @Teocalli

    That’s a gorgeous no expense spared bicycle!

    So you can understand how pi$$ed off the owner is to have had it stolen.

    10-4 to that. There’s some craftsmanship in that frame. The carbon weave… that is smokin’. I know we’re all big fans of fine Italian steel frame bikes but damn, there is every bit of Italian artistry displayed in this frame. I’ve never seen a Sarto bike before. I hope he gets it back unscathed asap.

  13. @MangoDave

    @Ron

    The downside: at least one of them is in need of a cleaning, some tuning, a repair.

    So true… Sometimes there’s even a little time afterward to go for a ride. Even so, I still enjoy working on them.

    I don’t mind working on my bikes, but I always feel an underlying sense of uneasiness when one of my bikes is not in working order. Had an eyelet crack off my commuter cross bike the other week, sorting that out was not fun. As useful as a rear rack and fenders are…they can be a real pain in the neck.

  14. @Teocalli: I saw this at Eroica for 250 EUR. Should I have?

  15. @Randy C

    @Teocalli

    @Randy C

    @Teocalli

    That’s a gorgeous no expense spared bicycle!

    So you can understand how pi$$ed off the owner is to have had it stolen.

    10-4 to that. There’s some craftsmanship in that frame. The carbon weave… that is smokin’. I know we’re all big fans of fine Italian steel frame bikes but damn, there is every bit of Italian artistry displayed in this frame. I’ve never seen a Sarto bike before. I hope he gets it back unscathed asap.

    Similar thing happened out here to a shop owner with his custom painted Cipollini RBK-1K, which was literally taken off one of the shop workstands. Safe to assume that’s one wrench who was in need of a new employer not long after…

    http://www.bicyclingtrade.com.au/news/retail/22-000-bike-stolen-from-shop-in-broad-daylight

  16. New bike day! Methinks she’s a sexy beast.

  17. Thank you, phone, for making me double post.

  18. @Bart

    WOW! Love it. Cheers

  19. @KogaLover

    @Teocalli: I saw this at Eroica for 250 EUR. Should I have?

    Who am I to say no? Of course you should have!

  20. @Bart

    Thank you, phone, for making me double post.

    Sweet – though I’d fit shorter valves.

  21. Yeah, and latex tubes. But apart from that: dream machine

  22. @Teocalli

    @Bart

    Thank you, phone, for making me double post.

    Sweet – though I’d fit shorter valve

    your inner ring looks comparatively tiny, what is the chainset? Cool looking bike reminds me of an Italian two seater sports car. Is it a small frame?

  23. Wasn’t feeling it with the Veloflex Masters on, looked amazing but didn’t love the road feel. Open Paves on board now.

  24. @Mikael Liddy

    What was it that you didn’t like about the Veloflex Master, Mikael?

  25. Some beautiful bikes here…

    Looking for sage advice from the Velominati please. I just picked up a 1984 Bianchi Limited (Japanese built Ishiwata tubing steel frame). Stripped it down, and I’m looking to build up with a modern groupset. My budget is pretty flexible, and I’m torn between a group-san that would maintain consistency with my other bike, and a gruppo that would be more fitting for the Bianchi brand. Although it was built in Japan….

    Anyway – the question is Shimano or Campagnolo? As the arbiters of all things cool and correct, I look forward to your well reasoned opinions.

  26. @GordoGreatBelly

    Some beautiful bikes here…

    Looking for sage advice from the Velominati please. I just picked up a 1984 Bianchi Limited (Japanese built Ishiwata tubing steel frame). Stripped it down, and I’m looking to build up with a modern groupset. My budget is pretty flexible, and I’m torn between a group-san that would maintain consistency with my other bike, and a gruppo that would be more fitting for the Bianchi brand. Although it was built in Japan….

    Anyway – the question is Shimano or Campagnolo? As the arbiters of all things cool and correct, I look forward to your well reasoned opinions.

    Ohhhh . . . tough call. The Japanese tubing (interesting that it’s not Columbus or, at a pinch, Reynolds) would say Group-san, but the Bianchi name says Campagnolo. The depth of your pockets might have a say too, but you’d be looking for older Campag on ebay I reckon.

    Speaking of bikes, I was in Milwaukee last week. Saw a lovely all-steel Basso outside where I was working. Scott Drop-in bars, Campag, etc. Just my size too. Needed a little TLC, but could be gorgeous. I was hoping to meet the owner, but he/she was nowhere in sight.

  27. @GordoGreatBelly

    Scour the inter-portals for period correct Campag.

    It’s the only option, you know it is !

    Besides, Having different running gear also means N+1 on the applicable tools also.

    That cant be a bad thing, except for the wallet.

  28. @Steve Trice there seemed to be very little comfort to the ride, every little road imperfection was felt & they seemed to react quite poorly to any sort of bump, twig, stone (especially on the front). Any time I lowered the pressure at all the rear felt sluggish and as if I was riding on a slow puncture.

  29. Got to be Campy on a Bianchi, surely.

  30. @Mikael Liddy

    Hmm, I know what you mean. I occasionally ride over not much at all and feel like I might have a rear wheel puncture, but I really think they’re the best rolling tyre I’ve ever ridden. Do you think the Open Pave compare on that front?

  31. @Steve Trice can’t compare as yet, 5k commute wasn’t really sufficient to judge, but there seems to be more give in the tyre. Proper test will probably come when I get a chance to hit the hills at some point this week.

  32. @piwakawaka

    @Teocalli

    @Bart

    Thank you, phone, for making me double post.

    Sweet – though I’d fit shorter valve

    your inner ring looks comparatively tiny, what is the chainset? Cool looking bike reminds me of an Italian two seater sports car. Is it a small frame?

    It’s a compact, 50 – 34. Frame is fairly big, almost 60 cm. Top tube is a bit shorter than it normally is on a 60 cm, but after my bikefitting session it was clear that my 1,86 m is normal, but I’ve got short arms and freakishly long legs, like an inverted gorilla.

    Handles like a sportscar too. Very nimble.

  33. @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time
    And although period correct would be more, erm, ‘correct’, I’m not looking to restore it to its former glory – more take the best of the old (the frame) and update it with new components. I’ve already cold set the drop outs to take a 130mm rear wheel/cassette combo, and eventually everything I put on it will be new and shiny.

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

  34. @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

  35. @Steve Trice

    @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

    Don’t need to go chrome. A nice Campag Alu hub polishes up fine with a bit of elbow grease and some Simichrome polish.

    Campag ‘coz you know it makes sense.

  36. @Teocalli

    @Steve Trice

    @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

    Don’t need to go chrome. A nice Campag Alu hub polishes up fine with a bit of elbow grease and some Simichrome polish.

    Campag ‘coz you know it makes sense.

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

  37. @paolo

    @Teocalli

    @Steve Trice

    @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

    Don’t need to go chrome. A nice Campag Alu hub polishes up fine with a bit of elbow grease and some Simichrome polish.

    Campag ‘coz you know it makes sense.

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

    There’s bound to be a video on You Tube showing that trick. I suppose it’s the same principle that lorry drivers use when they tie a bit of cloth to the wing mirrors to keep them clean.

  38. @Steve Trice

    @paolo

    @Teocalli

    @Steve Trice

    @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

    Don’t need to go chrome. A nice Campag Alu hub polishes up fine with a bit of elbow grease and some Simichrome polish.

    Campag ‘coz you know it makes sense.

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

    There’s bound to be a video on You Tube showing that trick. I suppose it’s the same principle that lorry drivers use when they tie a bit of cloth to the wing mirrors to keep them clean.

    Used to do it as a kid on my old Malvern Star, except it was a tennis shoe lace tied around the hubs. Work a treat

  39. @paolo

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

    When I were a lad at school we used to blag a pipe cleaner off one of the teachers to put round our hubs to keep them clean.

  40. My new Open U.P.

    Wasn’t a fan of the OEM orange or brown choices so I had it painted to my taste.

  41. @paolo

    @Teocalli

    @Steve Trice

    @GordoGreatBelly

    @wiscot

    @Barracuda

    @Steve Trice

    Think I’ve made up my mind – Campagnolo (probably Chorus), bought one piece at a time

    Now I need to figure out which wheels I’m going to get….

    Good choice on the gruppo. Wheels, perhaps 32 spoke on Mavic Open Pro with a lovely, polished chrome hub (if you can find one). Classy, classic and of the era I reckon.

    Don’t need to go chrome. A nice Campag Alu hub polishes up fine with a bit of elbow grease and some Simichrome polish.

    Campag ‘coz you know it makes sense.

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

    Holy moley! There’s nothing new under the sun! Forty years ago my Dad showed me a trick to keeping hubs polished. Braid together three pieces of cotton string. Tie around hub. Ride. Result? Super shiny hubs! No need for a You Tube video.

  42. @Teocalli

    @paolo

    Somebody on here a few years ago came up with a tip of putting polish on the hub then tying a little piece of rag around the hub small enough not to tangle and then go for a ride. I’ve never tried it but they swore it shone up brilliantly.

    When I were a lad at school we used to blag a pipe cleaner off one of the teachers to put round our hubs to keep them clean.

    I hear they use nothing else in Seattle and Portland!

  43. @Geraint

    My new Open U.P.

    Wasn’t a fan of the OEM orange or brown choices so I had it painted to my taste.

    Lovely. I’ve done the “little bit of orange” think on my #1 and #2 and graveur. Looks fantastic.

  44. Love the possibilities of rides that bike offers, Geraint.

    Bart. Holy cannoli. That Scapin is fucking awesome. Could be cousins with my silver Casati. As much as I love a busy Italian paint job, I love an understated one too, where the intricacies of the frame and build job are allowed to shine the brightest.

  45. @wiscot

    @Ron

    Thanks very much for your comments chaps. Only had a really quick shakedown spin on it, just couple of k on a mixture of road & flat singletrack with a few roots, really impressed so far, it could be the best of both MTB and road. It’ll take 650b MTB wheels and tyres as well, it’s quite a versatile bike.

  46. @Geraint

    Love the look, nice choice of color. It looks like you’ve selected gearing for pulling stumps out of the field or doing 30% climbs!

  47. @Steve Trice

    @Mikael Liddy

    Hmm, I know what you mean. I occasionally ride over not much at all and feel like I might have a rear wheel puncture, but I really think they’re the best rolling tyre I’ve ever ridden. Do you think the Open Pave compare on that front?

    So after a 50k shakedown through the hills (including a wet descent & a gravel climb), I’m a fan. Had them inflated to 7bar/110psi, which is the bottom of their advised range, personally I reckon I could drop it another 5-10 psi, but there was just a little more ‘give’ & softness to them.

    Another factor that didn’t work in the Veloflexes favour is that they advise to not run them on anything wider than a 23mm rim (something not advertised except in the finest of print on the instruction booklet), my HED Ardennes are a 25mm rim, so they were probably being asked to do too much.

  48. @Ron

    Love the possibilities of rides that bike offers, Geraint.

    Bart. Holy cannoli. That Scapin is fucking awesome. Could be cousins with my silver Casati. As much as I love a busy Italian paint job, I love an understated one too, where the intricacies of the frame and build job are allowed to shine the brightest.

    Pics or it didn’t happen! Yeah, it’s the little details that make it shine, like the brandname in the dropouts, BB, stuff like that. And make it shine even more with a shiny gruppo, love the classic look of the Athena group.

  49. @Mikael Liddy

    @Steve Trice

    @Mikael Liddy

    Hmm, I know what you mean. I occasionally ride over not much at all and feel like I might have a rear wheel puncture, but I really think they’re the best rolling tyre I’ve ever ridden. Do you think the Open Pave compare on that front?

    So after a 50k shakedown through the hills (including a wet descent & a gravel climb), I’m a fan. Had them inflated to 7bar/110psi, which is the bottom of their advised range, personally I reckon I could drop it another 5-10 psi, but there was just a little more ‘give’ & softness to them.

    Another factor that didn’t work in the Veloflexes favour is that they advise to not run them on anything wider than a 23mm rim (something not advertised except in the finest of print on the instruction booklet), my HED Ardennes are a 25mm rim, so they were probably being asked to do too much.

    25c Pave’s on Ardennes at 110 psi is very high. I’ve been running and racing Pave’s on the Ardennes and Jet + wheel sets for years. The 24’s (green skunk strip down middle), 25’s and 28’s (newer green side walls). I’ve run century rides on rough roads w/as low as 75 on front. 80’s work fine. Depending on my mood I might inflate rear to 90+ but not often. I’m around 77 kg myself fwiw.

    I still have sets of Pave’s to make it thru another winter season but after that ?? Not sure what I’ll move to. Especially if I get back to the Rouge Roubaix race next spring. Hard to believe they no longer want to make these.

    Don’t be afraid to push the lower limits and really find the sweetspot for yourself w/the wide rim bed concept and these super tires.

    Cheers

  50. Has anyone used Vittoria’s Magic Mastik on tubulars for cyclocross? As per the instructions?

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar