The Bikes

by / 14225 posts

The Bike. It is the central tool in pursuit of our craft. A Velominatus meticulously maintains their bicycles and adorns them with the essential, yet minimal, accoutrement. The Rules specify the principles of good taste in configuration and setup of our machines, but within those principles lies almost infinite room for personal taste.

It seems in some ways like a kind of Stockholm Syndrome, the way we honor our machines. We love them to a point that lies well beyond obsession. Upon these machines upon we endure endless suffering, but also find an unending pleasure. The rhythm, the harmony between rider and machine, the outdoors, the wind in our faces and air in our lungs.

The Bikes is devoted entirely to our machines. Ours, The Keepers, and yours, the Community. It features articles devoted to our bikes, and proves a forum for uploading photos of your own machines for discussion. We will be harsh, but fair; this is a place to enforce and enhance our observation of The Rules.

If you’d like to submit an article about your own beloved bike, please feel free to send it to us and we’ll do our best to work with you to include it.

  • Dialing in the Stable credit: CyclingnewsThis was going to be an article about Rule #45. It is amazing how much time is wasted and matches burned when professionals stop for that second bike change to get back on their #1. With all the jigs available to team mechanics it would seem they could set up five bikes exactly the same. And ...
  • Matching the drapes to the rug match 'em up!As a longtime titanium bike owner, I’ve always been jealous of a beautiful painted frame but Ti and carbon frames don’t need paint like a steel frame needs paint. But I want some painted beauty. It’s like buying a white car; I can’t do white, need some color. So between a Ti frame and a ...
  • Festum Prophetae: Waiting for the Hour The Machine of the HourEveryone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. – Mike Tyson The one thing everyone should always plan for is that however well-conceived a program might be, things will never go to plan. The high level plan for my Festum Prophetae Hour Ride was as follows: Have a custom Hour Bike built by Don Walker. Because reasons. Reasons like custom ...
  • The Aesthete’s Choice: Boyaux Naturel Going Phantom Aero on the FMB naturals. Photo: Rouleur.ccTradition and innovation are the two opposing edges that cut our evolution through the fabric of our sport. Tradition grounds us, while innovation ensures we advance ever forward. The problem with tradition is that it is comforting and familiar, often shielding us from adopting newer, improved practices and technology. The trouble with innovation is that its freshness can blind ...
  • On Rule #12: The Bike #1 Paradox This helps make a bike special.The only parents who proclaim to have a favorite child are the ones who have only one; all the other ones pretend they don’t have a favorite because they are each “different and special in their own way”. It’s complete bollocks, that, and we all know every parent does in fact have a favorite, but we ...
  1. @wiscot

    Yeah – given the power needed to start a gear most of us would find superhuman and still keep a bike upright you’d need a derny town to just get moving……I think I did read somewhere that it was a joke.

  2. town? darned auto correct. Tow of course.

  3. @RobSandy

    All this will depend on where you ride, the track the surface the conditions and the type of event(s) you are in.

    the rings and cogs are so personal as well as the tire pressure(s) for different tracks. This is why it is so good if you have a buddy you can go with first few times who wont point you in any strange directions.

    In between events the infield of the track looks like a NASCAR pit area everyone changing rings and cogs for the next event- and dont dare ask anyone which they are using…you would think you are asking for their mothers secret family recipe for soup or something like that. Thats why its best if you just go during some open track time and go out and blast away and find out what combo works best for you in short vs long events. Good chances are the cogs you have will need to be added to with a 16, 15, and 14, dont forget that your chain whip you have now for your road bike will not work on the track bike….also will need a cog/lock ring tool.

    Sure you have googled and youtubed the snot out of it- I know I did, but after all the watching and “learning” the only way to figure it out is to go and spin it out or blow up on the track from lactic acid spurting from your eyes…either way its going to hurt.

    Enjoy it pal, you got a great deal on a great bike

  4. @Dean C

    @RobSandy

    All this will depend on where you ride, the track the surface the conditions and the type of event(s) you are in.

    Sure you have googled and youtubed the snot out of it- I know I did, but after all the watching and “learning” the only way to figure it out is to go and spin it out or blow up on the track from lactic acid spurting from your eyes…either way its going to hurt.

    Enjoy it pal, you got a great deal on a great bike

    I’ve gone for the 16T – did the job last night and (touch wood) seem to have got the chain tension ok first go.

    We’ll see where it takes me – I’m open to the idea of racing on the track but I’ll have to see how the winter goes/how my speed is/how my bike handling and racecraft improve.

    I’m also planning to do a shitload of weights which wont do my sprinting any harm.

    Isn’t having a new bike lovely? I keep finding myself in the same room with it, finding something to tinker with.

  5. one of the topics i appreciate is the search for the v-locus. 20 years ago, i took a test ride on one of these, ishiwata chromoly, ultegra 600, tigged Ritchey steel quill, etc. it just fit perfectly. vertically compliant, laterally stiff, all the qualities of a prime steel ride immediately evident. i foolishly bought an Eddy Merckx Corsa instead. most expensive bike i ever purchased, and easily the worst. the ride was dead, and the bottom bracket flexy as could be, helped not at all by an extremely shitty Campagnolo Chorus weight relieved noodle of a crankset. lesson learned. the name on the frame doesn’t matter unless it sings in the big ring. every bike i’ve ridden since, road, track, or cross, has been measured against that Bridgestone RB-1.

  6. @RobSandy

    Isn’t having a new bike lovely? I keep finding myself in the same room with it, finding something to tinker with.

    indeed it is. especially after the honeymoon is over, you’ve got a few hundred miles in it, and you realize you’re DIALED. it does what you want, and illuminates possibilities previously unimagined.

    i like the process of discovery at this point. a half cm here, swap a saddle. change to 28c tires from 23s, and settle on 25s, etc.

  7. @Cary

    @RobSandy

    Isn’t having a new bike lovely? I keep finding myself in the same room with it, finding something to tinker with.

    indeed it is. especially after the honeymoon is over, you’ve got a few hundred miles in it, and you realize you’re DIALED. it does what you want, and illuminates possibilities previously unimagined.

    i like the process of discovery at this point. a half cm here, swap a saddle. change to 28c tires from 23s, and settle on 25s, etc.

    Hmm, yeah. I’m thinking 10mm extra on the stem, saddle forwards a little. More forward position, flatter back…we’ll see.

  8. I had no intention of picking up a new frameset, but LOVE having it in my workstand as I slowly add parts. Gives me something fun to plan, tinker, and work on.

    fenlander – Thanks! Slowly adding parts, it’s coming along. Only decision I’m still debating is whether or not to spring for a new fork/wheel to put a disc brake on the front. Decided to just shell out for a SRAM Rival 1 crankset, will pair with medium length Shimano RD and a Shimano trigger shifter.

  9. @RobSandy

    If you’re gonna do a bit of track riding, collect a few sprockets and chainrings. If you’re planning on getting faster, you’ll do over-geared and under-geared (strength and speed) work. The most economical place to start is a 47t front chainring, and 13-14-15 sprockets, from memory that gives you a 94, an 86 and a 70-odd inch gear, or a big gear for sprints/over gear work, 86 for endurance events, and a warm-up/cool down/speedwork gear.

  10. @Cary

    “the name on the frame doesn’t matter unless it sings in the big ring”

    This.

  11. @minion

    I’ve got a 18 and a 16 already, with a 50 chainring. Was thinking of getting a 14 in case I race.

    Interested as to what difference using a different sized chainring would make (assuming the total gear inches stayed the same).

  12. @RobSandy

    @minion

    I’ve got a 18 and a 16 already, with a 50 chainring. Was thinking of getting a 14 in case I race.

    Interested as to what difference using a different sized chainring would make (assuming the total gear inches stayed the same).

    I seem to remember Frohnk wrote an article some time back “proving” it was faster…………

  13. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    @minion

    I’ve got a 18 and a 16 already, with a 50 chainring. Was thinking of getting a 14 in case I race.

    Interested as to what difference using a different sized chainring would make (assuming the total gear inches stayed the same).

    I seem to remember Frohnk wrote an article some time back “proving” it was faster…………

    If some Dutch guy off of the Internets has proved it, must be true!

    I read somewhere a smaller chainring accelerates faster – but to my mind if they gear inches in total is the same, it should all be the same? Like, 50×16 should feel the same as 48×18?

    Of course I could just get a 56t front and a 12t rear and HTFU…

  14. @RobSandy

    Real science would indicate you should go Bigger/Bigger. Basically the tighter the bend the greater the power loss in a pulley system, so you should go with a bigger rear sprocket and to get the inches therefore a corresponding bigger chainring. Whether the %age marginal gain makes an iota of difference is the real question.

  15. @RobSandy

  16. Yeah, the smaller chainrings are supposed to generate more friction with the bend the links have to go through – there “might” be a difference on a road bike but on a track bike with no derailleurs , it won’t be the factor that makes any difference. I’ve been racing track for a few years and over that time I’ve built up a set of rings from 45, 47 to 53, and 13 – 18 tooth sprockets, all 1 1/8th. It really helps to have a warm up and cool down gear to spin on, like a low to mid 70 inch gear, it normally means being able to walk the following day.

  17. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    I think you need to fit one of these……

    You already mentioned that real science would dictate bigger/bigger. When I saw this picture I was not initially thinking that it will be impossible to turn the big ring, but rather how can you transfer the power to the small cog in the back, where you have maybe 5 teeth gripping the chain, without the chain skipping. You’d have to be very slow in speeding up.

    This gear ratio set up does work however:

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/09/news/ca-woman-rides-her-bicycle-147-mph-a-new-world-record_420507

    Note that the overall world record of fastest cyclist of the universe is still held by Fred Rompelberg, 268 kmph, a Dutch guy. But I chose this time to be less patriotic and give the place to a US female cyclist.

  18. Thinking about N+1: Scandium track frame. Colourpattern dubbed “Nemo” for obvious reasons. Will need some advice on build: wheels, bars, drivetrain/pedals/gear. Most important question: which colour should the bartape have: black, white or orange.

  19. @KogaLover

    Can’t answer any of that apart from bartape – white. Always white.

    However, I just had a google for Koga track frames and one of the pictures that came up was that frame, built up with track bars, single speed, etc etc…and a positive rise stem and a bloody EPMS! My eyes, my two good eyes!

  20. @KogaLover

    *Cat call Whistle sound*. Goodness me. That is a positively drool-worthy frame, that. Wow!

    Agree with @RobSandy on the bar tape. White. As for most of the gear (and in view of the proud tradition of the Koga line, especially during the ‘Miyata’ era), I’d be walking straight towards the Dura Ace shelves, I think (if I could afford to, that is). Couldn’t help thinking that there just might be a lot of good, slightly used D-A stuff to be found on the interwebs, if you look hard/patiently enough?

    I also couldn’t help thinking that such a frame, tricked out with D-A, with white bar-tape, wouldn’t look bad if ridden by a Velominatus decked out in a bright-orange/white Koga jersey with black lettering, and black bibs? (Insert smiley-winkey etc… here)

  21. @ErikdR

    I also couldn’t help thinking that such a frame, tricked out with D-A, with white bar-tape, wouldn’t look bad if ridden by a Velominatus decked out in a bright-orange/white Koga jersey with black lettering, and black bibs? (Insert smiley-winkey etc… here)

    Exactly, my thinking. Would look better than this:

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Finding-Nemo-Dress-Cosplay-Costume-Cartoon-Nemo-Golden-Fish-Halloween-Fancy-Suit-Christmas-Halloween/32716090912.html?spm=2114.40010308.4.50.8gOznM

    @RobSandy

    Complete disgrace! You must click the google-option “no EPMS”, then you will not see any pictures with EPMS. I still have my 2 good eyes after I googled Koga track frame.

  22. @KogaLover

    Cos I’m a nice guy I didn’t post the photo here.

    By the way, I’ve got track frame envy.

  23. @KogaLover

    Just laughed my head off at the Nemo outfit – that was hilarious (*wipes drops of Danish Lager off keyboard*).

    On a more serious note: have you actually tried riding fixed? I’ve been really curious about it (and have an old, steel Koga Miyata Road Speed SL frame gathering dust in the shed, waiting to be set up as a fixed gear training bike), but to be honest, the concept scares me a bit (as in: shitless). I keep getting these mental images of barrelling down a steep incline at speed, and for a moment forgetting that I cannot freewheel – and getting my legs torn off by my own bicycle.

    On the other hand, rumour has it that riding fixed is very good for developing a smooth pedal stroke. And once upon a time, my motto used to be: “Do something every day that scares you”, so I guess I could (and should) simply HTFU and go for it.

  24. @ErikdR

    @KogaLover

    Just laughed my head off at the Nemo outfit – that was hilarious (*wipes drops of Danish Lager off keyboard*).

    On a more serious note: have you actually tried riding fixed? I’ve been really curious about it (and have an old, steel Koga Miyata Road Speed SL frame gathering dust in the shed, waiting to be set up as a fixed gear training bike), but to be honest, the concept scares me a bit (as in: shitless). I keep getting these mental images of barrelling down a steep incline at speed, and for a moment forgetting that I cannot freewheel – and getting my legs torn off by my own bicycle.

    On the other hand, rumour has it that riding fixed is very good for developing a smooth pedal stroke. And once upon a time, my motto used to be: “Do something every day that scares you”, so I guess I could (and should) simply HTFU and go for it.

    Having taken my new track bike for a little spin outside, I can confidently state that riding a fixie downhill is fucking shit scary.

    Also, make sure you do the sprocket up properly and fit a lockring or the backwards pressure on the pedals as you ‘brake’ can make the sprocket unscrew. This removes all braking function from the bike.

  25. @RobSandy

    Hi Rob; thanks (I guess…)

    Now I’m really worried that I’ll kill myself dead trying to ride fixed. (Naahh – just kidding. The hills here in DK aren’t THAT scary, really – and I’ll be able to start off on very lenient, almost-flat roads if I plan things carefully. I’ll be fine.)

    And I really appreciate the expert and excellent advice on securing the sprocket. Duly noted.

  26. @ErikdR

    @RobSandy

    Hi Rob; thanks (I guess…)

    And I really appreciate the expert and excellent advice on securing the sprocket. Duly noted.

    I wouldn’t know anyone who’d take their new track bike out for a ride without tightening the sprocket properly and crash into a fence as a direct result. But hypothetically…yeah, just make sure that fucker is tight.

    On a completely unconnected note, I ordered myself a 1/8th chain whip this week and a lockring.

    Move on, nothing to see here…

  27. @RobSandy

    @ErikdR

    @RobSandy

    Hi Rob; thanks (I guess…)

    And I really appreciate the expert and excellent advice on securing the sprocket. Duly noted.

    I wouldn’t know anyone who’d take their new track bike out for a ride without tightening the sprocket properly and crash into a fence as a direct result. But hypothetically…yeah, just make sure that fucker is tight.

    On a completely unconnected note, I ordered myself a 1/8th chain whip this week and a lockring.

    Move on, nothing to see here…

    You do not need a chain whip, since you seem to be able to unlock your sprocket by braking?!

    Jokes aside: I am not planning to use it for road-rides, only track. I haven’t tried riding fixie but as @ErikdR says, seems to be good for building stroke. One of my -if my very- last rides on a fixie was when I was 4 years old and I came down a hill in Limburg where I grew up, could not brake, crashed my front teeth through my lip. This time I will wear a helmet and take a course.

    What rims do you have carb/alu? What frame carb/alu? Do you ride tubs or clinchers? What gears do you ride or do you have a selection? Any idea whether pedal length should be same or different to normal road-bike-length? Framesize different to road bike (I am not planning to do Keirin or so, just for June 17th hourly celebrations and the like) or shorter?

  28. @KogaLover

    A good one for building stroke is one legged intervals on the Turbo. If I can only fit in 30-45 mins when the weather is crap or I am busy a session would be:

    10 Mins high cadence low resistance

    2 mins Right Leg Only

    1 Min Both

    2 Mins Left Leg

    2 mins Both

    1 Min Right max effort

    1 Min Left Max effort

    1 min easy Spin

    10 Min High Cadence

    15 min rowing machine.

    The key target on the one legged is a smooth stroke with no “lump” over the top. It’s surprisingly difficult if you have not tried it but does improve with practice.

    It also leaves me with nothing but awe and respect for a few one legged folk I have seen out on the roads.

  29. @Teocalli

    Thanks! Bit too early in the season to set up the Turbo, but I also thought about putting the track frame onto the Turbo rollers first, so as to see what it is like to ride fixed gear.

  30. @KogaLover

    It also hurts like f&^%……..

  31. @Teocalli

    @KogaLover

    It also hurts like f&^%……..

    I keep meaning to do some one-legged drills but then find other things I’d rather do. Watching paint dry, watching grass grow, f’instance…

  32. @KogaLover

    What rims do you have carb/alu? What frame carb/alu? Do you ride tubs or clinchers? What gears do you ride or do you have a selection? Any idea whether pedal length should be same or different to normal road-bike-length? Framesize different to road bike (I am not planning to do Keirin or so, just for June 17th hourly celebrations and the like) or shorter?

    I have what came with the bike in terms of kit, so what a 15-20 year old handbuilt steel track bike would have! No idea on the crank length but I would guess shorter than what I use on the road (175mms).

    Gearing is still a bit of a puzzle to me – my instinct would be to get a medium sized chainring (which seems to be in the 48-50t range) and vary the rear sprocket size. But trackies seem to mess around with both. And I used maths and science and that – looked at what I thought a ‘typical’ speed would be for me on the track (I guessed 35-40kph while getting into it), looked at what a comfortable cadence would be for me at that speed (95-100rpms) and picked a gear which suited that (which also happened to come with the bike), so a 50×16.

    I have just bought a 14t in case I race as I think the speed would be a fair bit higher.

  33. @RobSandy

    And I used maths and science and that –

    That’s where yers a goin wrong

  34. @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    @KogaLover

    It also hurts like f&^%……..

    I keep meaning to do some one-legged drills but then find other things I’d rather do. Watching paint dry, watching grass grow, f’instance…

    I can’t remember where I read it, but I do recall a quote from an eminent cyclist/coach along the lines of “the only thing that one legged intervals are good for is to get better at pedaling with one leg“. Whether that is true or not, I have no idea but I don know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

  35. @chris

    @Teocalli

    @KogaLover

    It also hurts like f&^%……..

    I keep meaning to do some one-legged drills but then find other things I’d rather do. Watching paint dry, watching grass grow, f’instance…

    I can’t remember where I read it, but I do recall a quote from an eminent cyclist/coach along the lines of “the only thing that one legged intervals are good for is to get better at pedaling with one leg“. Whether that is true or not, I have no idea but I don know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

    That may be true but I expect that if your stroke is crap then trying to do one-legged drills will make this abundantly clear. I think mine is best described as ‘improving’ – I’m hoping the fact that I can now ride comfortably at a much higher cadence is a good sign.

  36. @chris

    ……..I don’t know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

    Didn’t that just answer itself?

  37. @KogaLover

    A full-face helmet? A standard one won’t stop you from putting your teeth through your lip. :p

  38. @Teocalli

    @chris

    ……..I don’t know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

    Didn’t that just answer itself?

    I think Chris meant “.I do know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out”

    Also –

    A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.” said the actress to the bishop.

  39. @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    @chris

    ……..I don’t know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

    Didn’t that just answer itself?

    I think Chris meant “.I do know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out”

    Also –

    “A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.” said the actress to the bishop.

    Lack of proof reading! Rob is correct, “I do know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out”

    As for that last sentence, it was deliberate, I do know how much @teocalli enjoys a bit of innuendo.

  40. @RobSandy

    @chris

    @Teocalli

    @KogaLover

    It also hurts like f&^%……..

    I keep meaning to do some one-legged drills but then find other things I’d rather do. Watching paint dry, watching grass grow, f’instance…

    I can’t remember where I read it, but I do recall a quote from an eminent cyclist/coach along the lines of “the only thing that one legged intervals are good for is to get better at pedaling with one leg“. Whether that is true or not, I have no idea but I don know that riding rollers really sorts your stroke out. A wayward stroke will have you off in no time at all.

    That may be true but I expect that if your stroke is crap then trying to do one-legged drills will make this abundantly clear. I think mine is best described as ‘improving’ – I’m hoping the fact that I can now ride comfortably at a much higher cadence is a good sign.

    Rollers are also good for working on your cadence, I used to be a bit of a masher but have gradually increased my average to the point that 100 rpm works well for a TT. It’ll be a bit lower on longer rides but is probably higher than average.

    Something to look forward to your new life as a trackie…

  41. @chris

    As for that last sentence, it was deliberate, I do know how much @teocalli enjoys a bit of innuendo.

    Crap. I must be working too hard today as I missed that between conf calls……….

  42. @chris

    Something to look forward to your new life as a trackie…

    Half life.

    I’m only planning to use the track through the winter for some extra kms. We’ll see if the door to racing opens. Cycling is an outdoor sport, innit?

  43. @Oli

    @KogaLover

    A full-face helmet? A standard one won’t stop you from putting your teeth through your lip. :p

    Point taken, but not planning to go down any hills this time around. Do expect some initial crashes though. Time to open the scars from previous falls. Zurich velodrome is concrete and outside so no splinters…

    Note I was 4 years or so old then. With the benefit of hindsight, my parents never should have given me that bike since our house was built up against a hill and I would ride around the block continuously. Or should have given me proper instructions (“take yer feet of the pedals and let the pavement scrape the rubber off the soles”)

  44. @RobSandy

    I’m only planning to use the track through the winter for some extra kms. We’ll see if the door to racing opens. Cycling is an outdoor sport, innit?

    Problem over here is that Zurich velodrome just closed for winter and reopens only in May so I still have some time to ponder about components and build up.

  45. Just a thought on how a DiscWorld Cycle Computer might pan out…….

    Bibbity bink – take the next left………

  46. @Teocalli @RobSandy @ErikdR

    OK, so after reading the various comments on fixed/track riding, I did become a little bit nervous about what I am about to embark upon! I think the continuous spinning should be good workout and fun to ride in a velodrome or on the Turbo. Am not planning to go out on the road.

    So I found this website https://humancyclist.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/riding-fixed-gear-bike/

    and while the upperlegs in those pictures that cannot be unseen, were not particularly appealing, it did get me thinking how on earth am I ever going to clip in with rotating pedals (am thinking about regular SPDs for pedals, not true track pedals with toeclips and straps)? Stepping down similar question but am more confident that will work. Guess that worries me now more than the colour of the bartape.

    Oh, and before I forget, the picture I found there resembles the one from a prior post above, so I start to think that riding a bike which such gears actually works.

  47. @KogaLover

    Bit of practice and you’ll be able to clip in on the move. Like this guy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvmibwafGXc

    The legs belong to Greipel (left) and Robert Forstman (right). We know Greipel’s guns are huge so that puts Forstman’s into perspective.

  48. @RobSandy

    @KogaLover

    Bit of practice and you’ll be able to clip in on the move. Like this guy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvmibwafGXc

    The legs belong to Greipel (left) and Robert Forstman (right). We know Greipel’s guns are huge so that puts Forstman’s into perspective.

    Struck me that there has to be a motor in that bike or his free hub needs a service.

    How I clip in with fixed (in the track environment) is to set off slowly just using one leg and once moving (slowly is emphasised) and in balance clip in the other. Seem a load of folk come a cropper trying to set off and clip in at the same time. The safest way is to hang on to the rail and clip in though……..

  49. @RobSandy

    @chris

    Something to look forward to your new life as a trackie…

    Half life.

    I’m only planning to use the track through the winter for some extra kms. We’ll see if the door to racing opens. Cycling is an outdoor sport, innit?

    I thought you were somewhere near Cardiff (unless your not the block I thought you were on Strava?!). Maindy is an outdoor track is it not?

  50. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    @KogaLover

    Bit of practice and you’ll be able to clip in on the move. Like this guy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvmibwafGXc

    The legs belong to Greipel (left) and Robert Forstman (right). We know Greipel’s guns are huge so that puts Forstman’s into perspective.

    Struck me that there has to be a motor in that bike or his free hub needs a service.

    How I clip in with fixed (in the track environment) is to set off slowly just using one leg and once moving (slowly is emphasised) and in balance clip in the other. Seem a load of folk come a cropper trying to set off and clip in at the same time. The safest way is to hang on to the rail and clip in though……..

    Clip in on the down stroke immediately after lifting your foot from the floor. Road bike, Track bike, whatever, is not the way of the Velominatus?

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar