The Bikes

by / 15534 posts

The Bike. It is the central tool in pursuit of our craft. A Velominatus meticulously maintains their bicycles and adorns them with the essential, yet minimal, accoutrement. The Rules specify the principles of good taste in configuration and setup of our machines, but within those principles lies almost infinite room for personal taste.

It seems in some ways like a kind of Stockholm Syndrome, the way we honor our machines. We love them to a point that lies well beyond obsession. Upon these machines upon we endure endless suffering, but also find an unending pleasure. The rhythm, the harmony between rider and machine, the outdoors, the wind in our faces and air in our lungs.

The Bikes is devoted entirely to our machines. Ours, The Keepers, and yours, the Community. It features articles devoted to our bikes, and proves a forum for uploading photos of your own machines for discussion. We will be harsh, but fair; this is a place to enforce and enhance our observation of The Rules.

If you’d like to submit an article about your own beloved bike, please feel free to send it to us and we’ll do our best to work with you to include it.

  • Rule #12 and the Cascade Effect That is a very reasonable opening salvo for the Rule about bike ownership. Three is good and certainly a minimum, and we are talking road bikes here, if there was any doubt. They naturally become ordered: the #1 is ichi-ban, top dog, go-to bike for every and all rides. #2 was the old #1, it ...
  • Guest Article: Black Is Not The New Black  @kogalover is singing my song here. Bikes are beautiful. ’nuff said. VLVV, Gianni With all those posts on riding in winter and being visible, either by putting Eyes of Sauron or other car melting devices on one’s steed, or by even considering a YJA instead of donning plain black kit, it was about time to finally get ...
  • Dialing in the Stable This was going to be an article about Rule #45. It is amazing how much time is wasted and matches burned when professionals stop for that second bike change to get back on their #1. With all the jigs available to team mechanics it would seem they could set up five bikes exactly the same. And ...
  • Matching the drapes to the rug As a longtime titanium bike owner, I’ve always been jealous of a beautiful painted frame but Ti and carbon frames don’t need paint like a steel frame needs paint. But I want some painted beauty. It’s like buying a white car; I can’t do white, need some color. So between a Ti frame and a ...
  • Festum Prophetae: Waiting for the Hour Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. – Mike Tyson The one thing everyone should always plan for is that however well-conceived a program might be, things will never go to plan. The high level plan for my Festum Prophetae Hour Ride was as follows: Have a custom Hour Bike built by Don Walker. Because reasons. Reasons like custom ...
  1. @Teocalli

    It’s starting to feel a bit like this! Frank let us lend a hand to keep it rolling?

    0

    https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/2ff5fe30-1680-4fe0-9554-c827b48777d4




    0
  2. Well after a long loving relationship with my Toupe it came to an abrupt end the week before Thanksgiving. It snapped. I was devastated. This was the last of three extras I had bought before they changed the design in 2014. I don’t get on with them at all now. They do not have level one padding anymore, and the shell no longer flexes. It seems you cannot get level 1 padding in any saddle less 2 power models. Oddly enough the shell now turns up on the edges and makes for a nice sharp edge to get your soft man bits torn apart. Looks like a bunch of their saddles are now made this way. Heres a pic of the Toupe, you can see the edges in the cutout…

    I was pretty bummed at the thought of looking for a new saddle. I tried like hell to get used to the new one. I tried a Sella Italia Superflow. That was Ok but the cutout was so big, and the edges of the cutout were pretty sharp and uncomfortable. I had an old fi'zi:k Arione laying around that came on an old Giant TCR I since sold. It had no cutout. Man was I surprised at how comfortable I was. It was great. But after 40 miles or so I started to feel a bunch of pressure on the taint. Again I was bummed. So I went to fi'zi:k’s site to have a look. I downloaded their app that supposed to tell you what type of reptile you are. I knew they would recommend chameleon for me but want to try the app out for the hell of it. Sure enough I was a chameleon. It recommended a Antares Large. It was black friday and all their saddles were 30% off. So I said F it and bought a Antares R1 Versus EVO Large, what a mouth full. It took a few days to get here from Italy. I threw it on when it came and gave it a go…. So far it feels like it may be a better saddle then my Toupe. It came in @ 175 grams. The quality is spot on and no harsh edges… This weekend I will have a good ride on it. I hope it works out.




    0
  3. @chuckp

    Strong sock game there Chuck!




    0
  4. Just had a cool experience. I work in an art museum. We’re planning on doing a show with Trek based on design principles next year. This, of course, necessitated a trip to the factory in Waterloo. We got the whole tour. Behind the scenes, the factory, the Project One lab. Saw frames getting painted, wheels trued, bikes assembled. It was awesome. I believe they do tours for the public (maybe not as extensive) but I’d really recommend it.




    0
  5. @wiscot

    That sounds cool.

    I had a thought regarding articles – what’s the word limit of these comments boxes?

    Could we paste our articles into one or more boxes, and share them that way?

    I don’t know about you but I’m keen to read @wiscot‘s articles, and anyone else’s for that matter.




    0
  6. @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    That sounds cool.

    I had a thought regarding articles – what’s the word limit of these comments boxes?

    Could we paste our articles into one or more boxes, and share them that way?

    I don’t know about you but I’m keen to read @wiscot‘s articles, and anyone else’s for that matter.

    0

    Well, Frank has three articles from me on deck, but I doubt they’ll ever get posted at this point. I might start looking for other outlets for them.

    The Trek tour was cool. A certain Texan rider and his career was notably absent. A big homage to Bertie in the Atrium though.




    0
  7. @wiscot

    Well, Frank has three articles from me on deck, but I doubt they’ll ever get posted at this point. I might start looking for other outlets for them.

    The Trek tour was cool. A certain Texan rider and his career was notably absent. A big homage to Bertie in the Atrium though.

    0

    I don’t know how I feel about Lance being erased from history. I’d prefer to have him there so no-one will forget what a massive cunzor he was/is.

    I think if we want something to happen re: articles we’re going to have to do it ourselves. I’ve got a couple.

    Post one up here, it’d be great to read something new.




    0
  8. I reckon the local hill and woods where I do my hill reps are populated by a tribe of tiny stone age people. It’s the only logical explanation for the perfectly formed miniature flint spear tips I pick up in my tyres.




    0
  9. @Teocalli

    I reckon the local hill and woods where I do my hill reps are populated by a tribe of tiny stone age people. It’s the only logical explanation for the perfectly formed miniature flint spear tips I pick up in my tyres.

    0

    Do you live in the Discworld?

    Actually, we’ve had conversations along these lines before and I think you do.

    Explains a lot.




    0
  10. Hi guys,

    I suppose I’m what you’d call a Lerker, but I come on here just about every day (for over a year), I don’t feel as though I’ve got much to offer as a recent recruit to cycling but I love going through the old posts and articles so any way you can get new stuff posted would be great.




    0
  11. @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    That sounds cool.

    I had a thought regarding articles – what’s the word limit of these comments boxes?

    Could we paste our articles into one or more boxes, and share them that way?

    I don’t know about you but I’m keen to read @wiscot‘s articles, and anyone else’s for that matter.

    0

    Well, Frank has three articles from me on deck, but I doubt they’ll ever get posted at this point. I might start looking for other outlets for them.

    The Trek tour was cool. A certain Texan rider and his career was notably absent. A big homage to Bertie in the Atrium though.

    0

    I think @RobSandy is onto something. Would you be opposed to putting your articles here in the discussion forum?




    0
  12. @MangoDave

    @wiscot

    @RobSandy

    @wiscot

    That sounds cool.

    I had a thought regarding articles – what’s the word limit of these comments boxes?

    Could we paste our articles into one or more boxes, and share them that way?

    I don’t know about you but I’m keen to read @wiscot‘s articles, and anyone else’s for that matter.

    0

    Well, Frank has three articles from me on deck, but I doubt they’ll ever get posted at this point. I might start looking for other outlets for them.

    The Trek tour was cool. A certain Texan rider and his career was notably absent. A big homage to Bertie in the Atrium though.

    0

    I think @RobSandy is onto something. Would you be opposed to putting your articles here in the discussion forum?

    0

    yes this is a great idea. +1




    0
  13. @wiscot

    The Trek tour was cool. A certain Texan rider and his career was notably absent. A big homage to Bertie in the Atrium though.


    0

    how typically disgusting. like him or not, Lance BUILT Trek bikes into what they are today. where the hell were Trek before Lance and USPS?? they made good bikes, but were decidedly uncool. Trek was the brand hairy legged Freds rode their centuries on. lol




    0
  14. Il Progetto Finito




    0
  15. @MangoDave

    @Cary

    I’ll try posting the last thing I wrote up tomorrow.




    0
  16. @RobSandy

    Il Progetto Finito

    0

    Sweet.




    0
  17. @RobSandy

    Il Progetto Finito

    0

    the very tits




    0
  18. Seven Deadly Sins

    Why do people do anything? What motivates our actions? Sometimes people do things selflessly, to help others, for the greater good, but the sad truth is that most of our actions are almost entirely self-serving.

    What motivates the actions of a great champion? We are used to hearing about strength of character being a driving force and I think there is truth to this when it comes to inspiring a champion to triumph against the odds. However, if we delve deeper into what motivates someone to compete in the first place, I think there’s a case that it is weakness of character, not strength which holds the reins. Self-doubt, narcissism, inferiority complexes, jealousy and ambition, these things fuel the competitive fires.

    I’m not a religious man but there seems to be a certain truth behind the list of 7 Deadly Sins. There are, after all, only a limited number of ways you can misbehave. Here they are and the cyclists I think represent each best.

    1. Gluttony

    The Cannibal was always hungry. For success, for wins, for titles and jerseys. But wins in races were not the only things he devoured. He also ate up his competitors; one by one he consumed each one: their spirit, their reputation, the self-belief, their very soul. And if his legs had been willing he would never have sated his colossal appetite. He would still be eating everything he could today.

    2. Greed

    If he’d cheated his way to winning a few less Tours De France (because although he’s been erased from history, let’s not forget that by the standards of the times he DID win those races), he might have escaped his antichrist status. But driven by greed he kept coming back; greed for kudos, money and domination over everyone else. And it was Lance Armstrong’s greed that was his downfall, driving him to give the Tour one more shot in 2009. Because for this guy, everything was never enough.

    3. Sloth

    One of the greatest sprinters of all time? The inventor of the sprint lead out train? World Champion? Yes, all this, and also the guy who turned up the air con in his hotel room to try and make himself ill so he could leave the Tour (it caused an illness, but only to roommate instead of him), started a fight and got himself disqualified from the 2000 Vuelta just before the first mountain stages, and took pictures of himself on the beach after quitting a Grand Tour on several occasions. Cipollini never actually made it as far as Paris despite starting the Tour 5 or 6 times. Undeniably gifted, often a champion, assuredly lazy.

    4. Wrath

    We all know a guy like this. You ride up next to him and the second your wheel moves a centimetre further up the road than his he responds immediately by pushing his ahead again. They can’t handle being in second place. It drives them to rage, and revenge. Off the bike, the general consensus is that Bernard Hinault is not as much of an asshole as you’d think, but on the bike, in race mode he’s a creature of anger and righteous fury, each ferocious pedal stroke an expression of rage against anyone who would challenge his superiority.

    5. Envy

    So, you’re the loyal super-domestique of a GC contender. Except, that you think you might be stronger than them. And lots of other people seem to think the same. Half of you wants to attack and see what you can do, the other half wants to be loyal and help your team leader. And then he’s the guy who wins the race overall and stands on top of the podium in the yellow jersey and gives a funny speech, and you smile and clap but all you can feel is envy. And then he’s Sports Personality of the Year and all you can think is it that could be you. Envy.

    Hello Chris Froome.

    6. Pride

    He watched his friend, rival and former team leader attack again and again. Each attack was futile, and both knew it. At the last desperate attack, at the foot of Alpe D’Huez, Laurent Fignon laughed at Bernard Hinault. Laughed at the extremes to which the Badger had been driven, out of pride. And laughed with his own pride, pride at his own strength and ability, the pride which drove him on to bring The Badger back and drop him to secure the Mailliot Jaune.

    7. Lust

    Jaques Anquetil. Don’t think I need to say any more about that.

    So, the question which remains is, what motivates you?




    0
  19. @RobSandy

    starting to sound like Kevin Spacey




    0
  20. @RobSandy

    Froome might have proved his point by now though, but there is always the one that got away.




    1
  21. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    Froome might have proved his point by now though, but there is always the one that got away.

    1

    yeah, anybody that didn’t see how strong Froome was in 2012 surely sees it now..




    0
  22. @RobSandy

    Seven Deadly Sins

    Why do people do anything? What motivates our actions? Sometimes people do things selflessly, to help others, for the greater good, but the sad truth is that most of our actions are almost entirely self-serving.

    What motivates the actions of a great champion? We are used to hearing about strength of character being a driving force and I think there is truth to this when it comes to inspiring a champion to triumph against the odds. However, if we delve deeper into what motivates someone to compete in the first place, I think there’s a case that it is weakness of character, not strength which holds the reins. Self-doubt, narcissism, inferiority complexes, jealousy and ambition, these things fuel the competitive fires.

    I’m not a religious man but there seems to be a certain truth behind the list of 7 Deadly Sins. There are, after all, only a limited number of ways you can misbehave. Here they are and the cyclists I think represent each best.

    1. Gluttony

    The Cannibal was always hungry. For success, for wins, for titles and jerseys. But wins in races were not the only things he devoured. He also ate up his competitors; one by one he consumed each one: their spirit, their reputation, the self-belief, their very soul. And if his legs had been willing he would never have sated his colossal appetite. He would still be eating everything he could today.

    2. Greed

    If he’d cheated his way to winning a few less Tours De France (because although he’s been erased from history, let’s not forget that by the standards of the times he DID win those races), he might have escaped his antichrist status. But driven by greed he kept coming back; greed for kudos, money and domination over everyone else. And it was Lance Armstrong’s greed that was his downfall, driving him to give the Tour one more shot in 2009. Because for this guy, everything was never enough.

    3. Sloth

    One of the greatest sprinters of all time? The inventor of the sprint lead out train? World Champion? Yes, all this, and also the guy who turned up the air con in his hotel room to try and make himself ill so he could leave the Tour (it caused an illness, but only to roommate instead of him), started a fight and got himself disqualified from the 2000 Vuelta just before the first mountain stages, and took pictures of himself on the beach after quitting a Grand Tour on several occasions. Cipollini never actually made it as far as Paris despite starting the Tour 5 or 6 times. Undeniably gifted, often a champion, assuredly lazy.

    4. Wrath

    We all know a guy like this. You ride up next to him and the second your wheel moves a centimetre further up the road than his he responds immediately by pushing his ahead again. They can’t handle being in second place. It drives them to rage, and revenge. Off the bike, the general consensus is that Bernard Hinault is not as much of an asshole as you’d think, but on the bike, in race mode he’s a creature of anger and righteous fury, each ferocious pedal stroke an expression of rage against anyone who would challenge his superiority.

    5. Envy

    So, you’re the loyal super-domestique of a GC contender. Except, that you think you might be stronger than them. And lots of other people seem to think the same. Half of you wants to attack and see what you can do, the other half wants to be loyal and help your team leader. And then he’s the guy who wins the race overall and stands on top of the podium in the yellow jersey and gives a funny speech, and you smile and clap but all you can feel is envy. And then he’s Sports Personality of the Year and all you can think is it that could be you. Envy.

    Hello Chris Froome.

    6. Pride

    He watched his friend, rival and former team leader attack again and again. Each attack was futile, and both knew it. At the last desperate attack, at the foot of Alpe D’Huez, Laurent Fignon laughed at Bernard Hinault. Laughed at the extremes to which the Badger had been driven, out of pride. And laughed with his own pride, pride at his own strength and ability, the pride which drove him on to bring The Badger back and drop him to secure the Mailliot Jaune.

    7. Lust

    Jaques Anquetil. Don’t think I need to say any more about that.

    So, the question which remains is, what motivates you?




    0

    wrath, envy, and pride. i am not very nice.




    0
  23. another question is, “who made who ” or what ??




    0
  24. for Malcolm




    0
  25. @RobSandy

    Seven Deadly Sins

    Why do people do anything? What motivates our actions? Sometimes people do things selflessly, to help others, for the greater good, but the sad truth is that most of our actions are almost entirely self-serving.

    What motivates the actions of a great champion? We are used to hearing about strength of character being a driving force and I think there is truth to this when it comes to inspiring a champion to triumph against the odds. However, if we delve deeper into what motivates someone to compete in the first place, I think there’s a case that it is weakness of character, not strength which holds the reins. Self-doubt, narcissism, inferiority complexes, jealousy and ambition, these things fuel the competitive fires.

    I’m not a religious man but there seems to be a certain truth behind the list of 7 Deadly Sins. There are, after all, only a limited number of ways you can misbehave. Here they are and the cyclists I think represent each best.

    1. Gluttony

    The Cannibal was always hungry. For success, for wins, for titles and jerseys. But wins in races were not the only things he devoured. He also ate up his competitors; one by one he consumed each one: their spirit, their reputation, the self-belief, their very soul. And if his legs had been willing he would never have sated his colossal appetite. He would still be eating everything he could today.

    2. Greed

    If he’d cheated his way to winning a few less Tours De France (because although he’s been erased from history, let’s not forget that by the standards of the times he DID win those races), he might have escaped his antichrist status. But driven by greed he kept coming back; greed for kudos, money and domination over everyone else. And it was Lance Armstrong’s greed that was his downfall, driving him to give the Tour one more shot in 2009. Because for this guy, everything was never enough.

    3. Sloth

    One of the greatest sprinters of all time? The inventor of the sprint lead out train? World Champion? Yes, all this, and also the guy who turned up the air con in his hotel room to try and make himself ill so he could leave the Tour (it caused an illness, but only to roommate instead of him), started a fight and got himself disqualified from the 2000 Vuelta just before the first mountain stages, and took pictures of himself on the beach after quitting a Grand Tour on several occasions. Cipollini never actually made it as far as Paris despite starting the Tour 5 or 6 times. Undeniably gifted, often a champion, assuredly lazy.

    4. Wrath

    We all know a guy like this. You ride up next to him and the second your wheel moves a centimetre further up the road than his he responds immediately by pushing his ahead again. They can’t handle being in second place. It drives them to rage, and revenge. Off the bike, the general consensus is that Bernard Hinault is not as much of an asshole as you’d think, but on the bike, in race mode he’s a creature of anger and righteous fury, each ferocious pedal stroke an expression of rage against anyone who would challenge his superiority.

    5. Envy

    So, you’re the loyal super-domestique of a GC contender. Except, that you think you might be stronger than them. And lots of other people seem to think the same. Half of you wants to attack and see what you can do, the other half wants to be loyal and help your team leader. And then he’s the guy who wins the race overall and stands on top of the podium in the yellow jersey and gives a funny speech, and you smile and clap but all you can feel is envy. And then he’s Sports Personality of the Year and all you can think is it that could be you. Envy.

    Hello Chris Froome.

    6. Pride

    He watched his friend, rival and former team leader attack again and again. Each attack was futile, and both knew it. At the last desperate attack, at the foot of Alpe D’Huez, Laurent Fignon laughed at Bernard Hinault. Laughed at the extremes to which the Badger had been driven, out of pride. And laughed with his own pride, pride at his own strength and ability, the pride which drove him on to bring The Badger back and drop him to secure the Mailliot Jaune.

    7. Lust

    Jaques Anquetil. Don’t think I need to say any more about that.

    So, the question which remains is, what motivates you?

    Well played, sir!

    And since it’s “the BIKES” section, a pic of my Hollands. Actually took it out for a short spin the other day. First time I’ve done that in a long while. Forgotten how steel is real. One of my winter projects will be re-building the wheel set (Sansin hubs, Mavic CXP30 rims). Not that there’s anything particularly “wrong” with the wheels. Just feel like doing it because it’s something to do.

    Cheers y’all1




    0
  26. @chuckp

    @RobSandy

    Seven Deadly Sins

    Why do people do anything? What motivates our actions? Sometimes people do things selflessly, to help others, for the greater good, but the sad truth is that most of our actions are almost entirely self-serving.

    What motivates the actions of a great champion? We are used to hearing about strength of character being a driving force and I think there is truth to this when it comes to inspiring a champion to triumph against the odds. However, if we delve deeper into what motivates someone to compete in the first place, I think there’s a case that it is weakness of character, not strength which holds the reins. Self-doubt, narcissism, inferiority complexes, jealousy and ambition, these things fuel the competitive fires.

    I’m not a religious man but there seems to be a certain truth behind the list of 7 Deadly Sins. There are, after all, only a limited number of ways you can misbehave. Here they are and the cyclists I think represent each best.

    1. Gluttony

    The Cannibal was always hungry. For success, for wins, for titles and jerseys. But wins in races were not the only things he devoured. He also ate up his competitors; one by one he consumed each one: their spirit, their reputation, the self-belief, their very soul. And if his legs had been willing he would never have sated his colossal appetite. He would still be eating everything he could today.

    2. Greed

    If he’d cheated his way to winning a few less Tours De France (because although he’s been erased from history, let’s not forget that by the standards of the times he DID win those races), he might have escaped his antichrist status. But driven by greed he kept coming back; greed for kudos, money and domination over everyone else. And it was Lance Armstrong’s greed that was his downfall, driving him to give the Tour one more shot in 2009. Because for this guy, everything was never enough.

    3. Sloth

    One of the greatest sprinters of all time? The inventor of the sprint lead out train? World Champion? Yes, all this, and also the guy who turned up the air con in his hotel room to try and make himself ill so he could leave the Tour (it caused an illness, but only to roommate instead of him), started a fight and got himself disqualified from the 2000 Vuelta just before the first mountain stages, and took pictures of himself on the beach after quitting a Grand Tour on several occasions. Cipollini never actually made it as far as Paris despite starting the Tour 5 or 6 times. Undeniably gifted, often a champion, assuredly lazy.

    4. Wrath

    We all know a guy like this. You ride up next to him and the second your wheel moves a centimetre further up the road than his he responds immediately by pushing his ahead again. They can’t handle being in second place. It drives them to rage, and revenge. Off the bike, the general consensus is that Bernard Hinault is not as much of an asshole as you’d think, but on the bike, in race mode he’s a creature of anger and righteous fury, each ferocious pedal stroke an expression of rage against anyone who would challenge his superiority.

    5. Envy

    So, you’re the loyal super-domestique of a GC contender. Except, that you think you might be stronger than them. And lots of other people seem to think the same. Half of you wants to attack and see what you can do, the other half wants to be loyal and help your team leader. And then he’s the guy who wins the race overall and stands on top of the podium in the yellow jersey and gives a funny speech, and you smile and clap but all you can feel is envy. And then he’s Sports Personality of the Year and all you can think is it that could be you. Envy.

    Hello Chris Froome.

    6. Pride

    He watched his friend, rival and former team leader attack again and again. Each attack was futile, and both knew it. At the last desperate attack, at the foot of Alpe D’Huez, Laurent Fignon laughed at Bernard Hinault. Laughed at the extremes to which the Badger had been driven, out of pride. And laughed with his own pride, pride at his own strength and ability, the pride which drove him on to bring The Badger back and drop him to secure the Mailliot Jaune.

    7. Lust

    Jaques Anquetil. Don’t think I need to say any more about that.

    So, the question which remains is, what motivates you?

    Well played, sir!

    And since it’s “the BIKES” section, a pic of my Hollands. Actually took it out for a short spin the other day. First time I’ve done that in a long while. Forgotten how steel is real. One of my winter projects will be re-building the wheel set (Sansin hubs, Mavic CXP30 rims). Not that there’s anything particularly “wrong” with the wheels. Just feel like doing it because it’s something to do.

    Cheers y’all1

    0

    damn that bike is sexy




    0
  27. @Cary

    Thanx! I’m debating putting white/black combo bar tape on it. Black on the tops and white in the drops. Would carry over the same color scheme as the saddle.




    0
  28. @gilly

    @chuckp

    Strong sock game there Chuck!

    Not sure which socks you’re referring to, but thanx! I actually tend to be a Rules violator when it comes to socks. I kinda like 5-6″ height socks. And I have a lot of different socks that make a “statement.”

    Although sometimes I do go Full Monty and am matchy-matchy with socks.




    0
  29. The sun was out today in NorCal so I decided to take out the EVO. As you can see Gentullio was shinning approval from above…




    0
  30. @Cary

    So, the question which remains is, what motivates you?

    0

    wrath, envy, and pride. i am not very nice.

    I think, perhaps, this is the point I was trying to make.

    I’m a bastard but I’m not the only one.




    0
  31. @chuckp

    Argh! So many colours!

    @Hapsmo

    The sun was out today in NorCal so I decided to take out the EVO. As you can see Gentullio was shinning approval from above…




    0

    There’s something very pleasing about the geo of that bike. Probably the horizontal TT.

    The wheels look badass too. Hope you had a good ride.




    0
  32. @RobSandy

    Fixed it for you…….




    0
  33. Early prezzie to self – hopefully this will help my ageing legs and knackered knees over the Spring challenges…..




    0
  34. Merry Christmas to all

    https://twitter.com/iamspecialized/status/942756546076868608




    0
  35. @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !




    0
  36. @ChrisO

    @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !

    0

    11-32 – They came out with the Potenza group set but they have now added medium cage RDs across the range.




    0
  37. @Teocalli

    @ChrisO

    @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !

    0

    11-32 – They came out with the Potenza group set but they have now added medium cage RDs across the range.

    0

    I put an 12-30 on my Felt in my early days as a roadie. Still being’s me out in cold sweats thinking about it now.

    Looking for an 11 spd 11-23 for my new race wheels.




    0
  38. @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    @ChrisO

    @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !

    0

    11-32 – They came out with the Potenza group set but they have now added medium cage RDs across the range.

    0

    I put an 12-30 on my Felt in my early days as a roadie. Still being’s me out in cold sweats thinking about it now.

    Looking for an 11 spd 11-23 for my new race wheels.

    0

    I remember my first trip out on my first road bike (an alloy 2012 Boardman I picked up on eBay, now my trusty #9), and I blew my lungs out grinding the bottom ratio 34/28 on an incline that can’t have been more than 3% for 200m.

    I love our sport!




    0
  39. @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    @ChrisO

    @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !

    0

    11-32 – They came out with the Potenza group set but they have now added medium cage RDs across the range.

    0

    I put an 12-30 on my Felt in my early days as a roadie. Still being’s me out in cold sweats thinking about it now.

    Looking for an 11 spd 11-23 for my new race wheels.

    0

    There are 3 climbs on the Strade Bianche where I’ll need all those………




    0
  40. Merry Christmas y’all! My latest for PEZ. Review of Road to Valor. Definitely a good read.

    https://www.pezcyclingnews.com/features/pez-bookshelf-road-to-valor/#.Wj-bxCtOnYU




    0
  41. @Teocalli

    @RobSandy

    @Teocalli

    @ChrisO

    @Teocalli

    Is that 11-34 – I didn’t know they made such things !

    0

    11-32 – They came out with the Potenza group set but they have now added medium cage RDs across the range.

    0

    I put an 12-30 on my Felt in my early days as a roadie. Still being’s me out in cold sweats thinking about it now.

    Looking for an 11 spd 11-23 for my new race wheels.

    0

    There are 3 climbs on the Strade Bianche where I’ll need all those………

    0

    It’s horses for courses innit. I have a triple on one of my bikes so I’m in no position to judge.

    I recently mixed and matched my old 12-25 race cassette with a 11-27 I bought for £5 of the intertubies to create my ideal training cassette – the 12-27. It’s perfect. Don’t know what I’ll do when I wear it out




    0
  42. In Reckless by Fotheringham, Luis Ocana’s Fagor team-mates named him Chepas (Humpy) as they felt his slight hunchback gave him a natural aero advantage when riding a TT bike. I was reminded of this as I was browsing rider photos in adverts in a magazine and idly flicking through the pages when a thought came to my mind in relation to Rule #45 and the impact of an individual’s morphology. At that point with a word like that I can hear heads hitting desks already, but bear with me. I will be brief.

    There are a whole host of parameters that affect how low we might want, or be able, to stack our stems. Age and resultant flexibility not being the least of those but here I want to dwell on a factor over which we have little control, as it is determined by our individual body shapes.

    What struck me in browsing the ads, was that for any individual the form of their back has a significant factor on their resultant shoulder position (height) when riding and so would influence their resultant stem height (stack). For the sake of consistency, I’m assuming the ability to develop power is delivered with a constant minimum hip angle (lower back to thigh).

    So, in the diagram below, consider someone with an arched back (blue) vs someone with a straight back (red). For the same hip angle the individual with a naturally arched or rounded back will achieve a lower shoulder position than an individual with a straight back. All things being equal, they would be able to stack a lower stem. So perhaps we should be considering what type of back we have when setting a target for our stack height.




    0
  43. Part 2 of the above………

    On a more irreverent note, it further struck me that as we try to achieve a minimum hip flex angle there is also another factor that comes into play. This I have termed the RAR Factor or Recovery Ale Rotundity Factor. The significance of this factor is that the higher the RAR Factor the more difficult it is to breathe at lower hip angles owing to one’s Rotundity being pressed up against one’s diaphragm. The diagram below attempts to illustrate this factor.

    So, whilst we may be able to do something to reduce our RAR Factor to comply with Rule #45 there may be little we can do to influence how the morphology of our backs impacts our riding position.

    Interestingly, a while after coming up with these thoughts, I was reading an article by a bike fitter who works with some of the Pro Riders and he was talking about body position being influenced by the minimum hip angle at which maximum power can be sustained for an individual. So maybe the thought that came to me makes some sense.




    0
  44. Just because it’s now my Nr#2 doesn’t mean it can’t be nice and clean and have a sweet new tape job.




    0
  45. Custom Footbeds. I have very high arches and just got some of these. They seem pretty good and given I want loads of support I’m starting with them without heating them to quick form and let them bed in and see how they go. Initial impressions are good and thinking of a second set rather than swap between shoes.




    0
  46. @Teocalli

    Custom Footbeds. I have very high arches and just got some of these. They seem pretty good and given I want loads of support I’m starting with them without heating them to quick form and let them bed in and see how they go. Initial impressions are good and thinking of a second set rather than swap between shoes.

    0

    Let us know how they feel. I’m the opposite – low arches. I have some unused high and extra high Giro arch supports looking for a good home should they be desired.




    0
  47. @wiscot

    @Teocalli

    Custom Footbeds. I have very high arches and just got some of these. They seem pretty good and given I want loads of support I’m starting with them without heating them to quick form and let them bed in and see how they go. Initial impressions are good and thinking of a second set rather than swap between shoes.

    0

    Let us know how they feel. I’m the opposite – low arches. I have some unused high and extra high Giro arch supports looking for a good home should they be desired.

    0

    So yesterday I ran them out of the box on the rollers and they felt pretty good, way better for me than the standard Sidi footbeds. Today I heated them up in the oven and then put them in the shoes and clamped up. On my afternoon roller session they are noticeably better than yesterday. So at the moment I can highly recommend these, though of course the real test will be in a long ride.




    0
  48. @Teocalli

    I think you have been spending way too much time figuring out an excuse to keep a high stem simply because you drink too much beer.

    Why have a sixpack when you can have a barrel, right?




    0
  49. @KogaLover

    @Teocalli

    I think you have been spending way too much time figuring out an excuse to keep a high stem simply because you drink too much beer.

    Why have a sixpack when you can have a barrel, right?

    0

    Ha Ha. I have not quoted my (current) RAR factor………




    0
  50. @Teocalli

    @wiscot

    @Teocalli

    Custom Footbeds. I have very high arches and just got some of these. They seem pretty good and given I want loads of support I’m starting with them without heating them to quick form and let them bed in and see how they go. Initial impressions are good and thinking of a second set rather than swap between shoes.

    0

    Let us know how they feel. I’m the opposite – low arches. I have some unused high and extra high Giro arch supports looking for a good home should they be desired.

    0

    So yesterday I ran them out of the box on the rollers and they felt pretty good, way better for me than the standard Sidi footbeds. Today I heated them up in the oven and then put them in the shoes and clamped up. On my afternoon roller session they are noticeably better than yesterday. So at the moment I can highly recommend these, though of course the real test will be in a long ride.

    0

    I hear ya. I just got a pair of Shimano R9s and basically I took out all the arch support. On rollers they feel pretty damn good, but as you say, the proof will be in a long ride on the road.




    0

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar