The Bikes

by / 14412 posts

The Bike. It is the central tool in pursuit of our craft. A Velominatus meticulously maintains their bicycles and adorns them with the essential, yet minimal, accoutrement. The Rules specify the principles of good taste in configuration and setup of our machines, but within those principles lies almost infinite room for personal taste.

It seems in some ways like a kind of Stockholm Syndrome, the way we honor our machines. We love them to a point that lies well beyond obsession. Upon these machines upon we endure endless suffering, but also find an unending pleasure. The rhythm, the harmony between rider and machine, the outdoors, the wind in our faces and air in our lungs.

The Bikes is devoted entirely to our machines. Ours, The Keepers, and yours, the Community. It features articles devoted to our bikes, and proves a forum for uploading photos of your own machines for discussion. We will be harsh, but fair; this is a place to enforce and enhance our observation of The Rules.

If you’d like to submit an article about your own beloved bike, please feel free to send it to us and we’ll do our best to work with you to include it.

  • Rule #12 and the Cascade Effect Pre-RulesRule #12: the minimum number of bikes to own is three. That is a very reasonable opening salvo for the Rule about bike ownership. Three is good and certainly a minimum, and we are talking road bikes here, if there was any doubt. They naturally become ordered: the #1 is ichi-ban, top dog, go-to bike ...
  • Guest Article: Black Is Not The New Black He loves a Koga @kogalover is singing my song here. Bikes are beautiful. ’nuff said. VLVV, Gianni With all those posts on riding in winter and being visible, either by putting Eyes of Sauron or other car melting devices on one’s steed, or by even considering a YJA instead of donning plain black kit, it was about time to finally get ...
  • Dialing in the Stable credit: CyclingnewsThis was going to be an article about Rule #45. It is amazing how much time is wasted and matches burned when professionals stop for that second bike change to get back on their #1. With all the jigs available to team mechanics it would seem they could set up five bikes exactly the same. And ...
  • Matching the drapes to the rug match 'em up!As a longtime titanium bike owner, I’ve always been jealous of a beautiful painted frame but Ti and carbon frames don’t need paint like a steel frame needs paint. But I want some painted beauty. It’s like buying a white car; I can’t do white, need some color. So between a Ti frame and a ...
  • Festum Prophetae: Waiting for the Hour The Machine of the HourEveryone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. – Mike Tyson The one thing everyone should always plan for is that however well-conceived a program might be, things will never go to plan. The high level plan for my Festum Prophetae Hour Ride was as follows: Have a custom Hour Bike built by Don Walker. Because reasons. Reasons like custom ...
  1. @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

  2. @RobSandy

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

    Start hitting the weight room! The Kilo along with the match sprint is the realm of the monster quads! The kilo is all about starting out of the gates….and going FULL TILT until you die…then you still have 200m to go…lol

    Here is a great vid of Francois Pervis in 2013. THe start out of the gate is as about as perfect as possible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8lDyKMKsY

  3. @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    me too. nothing i’ve ever done in my life has hurt worse than a bad kilo.

  4. @KogaLover

    I am well aware gear inches is a somewhat arcane “measurement”, and I never claimed it was accurate, but it’s by far the most common way for English-speaking riders to express their gearing in a common language – if a rider says to another he has an 86″ gear everyone knows what he means and can compare their gearing on those terms.

    Roll-out/development probably should be in more common use and I’m sure it will be eventually, but old habits die hard.

  5. @Haldy

    Oh, that was a BRILLIANT video! I had never watched a 1 k before.

    Just awesome and it was great to see that his thighs did not look like they had come out of an East German lab, either!

  6. @Buck Rogers

    @Haldy

    Oh, that was a BRILLIANT video! I had never watched a 1 k before.

    Just awesome and it was great to see that his thighs did not look like they had come out of an East German lab, either!

    check out Florian Rousseau and Erin Hartwell, too. Rousseau basically upended the entire sprint discipline in the ’90s, and Erin Hartwell had a LONG kilo career for team USA. i think they’re awesome.

  7. @Cary

    @Buck Rogers

    @Haldy

    Oh, that was a BRILLIANT video! I had never watched a 1 k before.

    Just awesome and it was great to see that his thighs did not look like they had come out of an East German lab, either!

    check out Florian Rousseau and Erin Hartwell, too. Rousseau basically upended the entire sprint discipline in the ’90s, and Erin Hartwell had a LONG kilo career for team USA. i think they’re awesome.

    Having ridden intervals of that length and planning to possibly race over that distance, the pain and suffering for the whole last lap is palpable.

    I enjoy watching how those guys can channel such awesome strength and power into a minute of complete smooth focussed riding.

  8. I like Rousseau because, as late as 1995, he was turning 1:03 kilos, sans tribars. he was not a great big guy, either, he just had MAD explosiveness. i like Hartwell because NOBODY of his era was faster over the last 250m.

    such a demanding discipline. very fascinating.

  9. Well I’m no mathematical genius or anything, but I have 50×15 at 88.18″ on a 25c tyre, and 87.68″ on a 23c.

  10. @DVMR

    Well I’m no mathematical genius or anything, but I have 50×15 at 88.18″ on a 25c tyre, and 87.68″ on a 23c.

    I agree with this guy.

  11. @Oli

    @KogaLover

    I am well aware gear inches is a somewhat arcane “measurement”, and I never claimed it was accurate, but it’s by far the most common way for English-speaking riders to express their gearing in a common language – if a rider says to another he has an 86″ gear everyone knows what he means and can compare their gearing on those terms.

    Roll-out/development probably should be in more common use and I’m sure it will be eventually, but old habits die hard.

    I think the point about crank length BTW was that it doesn’t make a difference to the gear inches (or development) but it does make a difference to the overall gearing.

  12. @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

    Start hitting the weight room! The Kilo along with the match sprint is the realm of the monster quads! The kilo is all about starting out of the gates….and going FULL TILT until you die…then you still have 200m to go…lol

    Here is a great vid of Francois Pervis in 2013. THe start out of the gate is as about as perfect as possible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8lDyKMKsY

    Was hoping Haldy and a few others with much more Velodrome experience would pop in on this thread.

    One thing I have learned from my limited time there is don’t paint yourself into “I have to get a 1:15 or less or else” there are so many factors that can slow down or speed up everyone’s times for a given day.

    Are you racing on a 333 or 250? What is your local training track? 250 or 333 concrete or wood, inside or outdoors?

    What might be a “fast” time at one track might be “so-so” at another for a 1K and all other ITTs and pursuits.

    No matter what or how you train your last lap will a sufferfest, you will look down swearing one of your tires is half flat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki2re9uILtc

    “Standing Start (2009): A unique insight into a champion’s adrenaline and drive as he trains for the Olympics. Maclean’s heroic cycling is set against the story of Odysseus, creating a heart-stoppingly rich portrayal of man.”

    Don’t get too wrapped up in gear/inches bla bla bla; know what works for you- not the other guy. Teams and other riders go to the trouble of grinding the tooth-count numbers off their cogs and rings so nobody else can see what they are riding, so if you ask a local, chances are you will not get a spot-on answer- even to what the locals recommend for tire pressures for “their” track surface.

    For crank lengths, some tracks do not allow any longer than 170 due to rider safety(bank degrees vs. pedal strike). For others its leverage vs. rotation speed.

    Take care

  13. @Dean C

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

    Start hitting the weight room! The Kilo along with the match sprint is the realm of the monster quads! The kilo is all about starting out of the gates….and going FULL TILT until you die…then you still have 200m to go…lol

    Here is a great vid of Francois Pervis in 2013. THe start out of the gate is as about as perfect as possible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8lDyKMKsY

    Was hoping Haldy and a few others with much more Velodrome experience would pop in on this thread.

    One thing I have learned from my limited time there is don’t paint yourself into “I have to get a 1:15 or less or else” there are so many factors that can slow down or speed up everyone’s times for a given day.

    Are you racing on a 333 or 250? What is your local training track? 250 or 333 concrete or wood, inside or outdoors?

    What might be a “fast” time at one track might be “so-so” at another for a 1K and all other ITTs and pursuits.

    No matter what or how you train your last lap will a sufferfest, you will look down swearing one of your tires is half flat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki2re9uILtc

    “Standing Start (2009): A unique insight into a champion’s adrenaline and drive as he trains for the Olympics. Maclean’s heroic cycling is set against the story of Odysseus, creating a heart-stoppingly rich portrayal of man.”

    Don’t get too wrapped up in gear/inches bla bla bla; know what works for you- not the other guy. Teams and other riders go to the trouble of grinding the tooth-count numbers off their cogs and rings so nobody else can see what they are riding, so if you ask a local, chances are you will not get a spot-on answer- even to what the locals recommend for tire pressures for “their” track surface.

    For crank lengths, some tracks do not allow any longer than 170 due to rider safety(bank degrees vs. pedal strike). For others its leverage vs. rotation speed.

    Take care

    Technique! That’s probably the biggest key. Learning how to do a proper standing start( it’s not as easy as it sounds..) and also learning how to sit down on a fixed gear at speed( plopping down on the saddle scrubs off speed..you have to slide back on to it) are key to doing well. Also learning how to stay glued to the black line. Time and distance are measured off the black line. The farther away you are from the black line in the turns, the more time you are giving away by traveling farther.

  14. @Haldy

    @Dean C

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

    Start hitting the weight room! The Kilo along with the match sprint is the realm of the monster quads! The kilo is all about starting out of the gates….and going FULL TILT until you die…then you still have 200m to go…lol

    Here is a great vid of Francois Pervis in 2013. THe start out of the gate is as about as perfect as possible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8lDyKMKsY

    Was hoping Haldy and a few others with much more Velodrome experience would pop in on this thread.

    One thing I have learned from my limited time there is don’t paint yourself into “I have to get a 1:15 or less or else” there are so many factors that can slow down or speed up everyone’s times for a given day.

    Are you racing on a 333 or 250? What is your local training track? 250 or 333 concrete or wood, inside or outdoors?

    What might be a “fast” time at one track might be “so-so” at another for a 1K and all other ITTs and pursuits.

    No matter what or how you train your last lap will a sufferfest, you will look down swearing one of your tires is half flat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki2re9uILtc

    “Standing Start (2009): A unique insight into a champion’s adrenaline and drive as he trains for the Olympics. Maclean’s heroic cycling is set against the story of Odysseus, creating a heart-stoppingly rich portrayal of man.”

    Don’t get too wrapped up in gear/inches bla bla bla; know what works for you- not the other guy. Teams and other riders go to the trouble of grinding the tooth-count numbers off their cogs and rings so nobody else can see what they are riding, so if you ask a local, chances are you will not get a spot-on answer- even to what the locals recommend for tire pressures for “their” track surface.

    For crank lengths, some tracks do not allow any longer than 170 due to rider safety(bank degrees vs. pedal strike). For others its leverage vs. rotation speed.

    Take care

    Technique! That’s probably the biggest key. Learning how to do a proper standing start( it’s not as easy as it sounds..) and also learning how to sit down on a fixed gear at speed( plopping down on the saddle scrubs off speed..you have to slide back on to it) are key to doing well. Also learning how to stay glued to the black line. Time and distance are measured off the black line. The farther away you are from the black line in the turns, the more time you are giving away by traveling farther.

    Very True! I can say that I have had some very good bike “holders” at some of my standing starts and some very young inexperienced ones that have probably cost me a full second + from just miss-handling my bike during final seconds and release. But going to Nationals for your first race you should not see any of that.

    Focus on the black line like Haldy says, the more time you spend away from it and wandering up near the red line the longer “your” track just became.

    Although by the last 200 meters the black line becomes somewhat fuzzy, replaced by dancing black dots in front of my vision.

    Also if you are going with a buddy, have him “pace” you with a stopwatch:

    From training you know you are gunning for a 1:15 on a 250 meter track.

    First lap with standing start: 21 seconds

    2nd, 3rd and 4th laps- all 18 seconds or less= 75 seconds.

    Your “pacemans” job is to yell to you as you roll by if you are at , below or above your pace to reach your time.

    As you do your sprint training around your neighborhood don’t get put off if your times in the Velodrome do not match those you post at home, a 250 meter Velodrome with it’s sharp turns takes an enormous amount of speed away from you. It’s one reason many will post faster times at a 333, more gradual turns=less friction+ less of them per kilo.

    Take care

  15. Use-by dates for bikes??!!

    Should there be a ‘safe’ life for bicycle parts?

  16. @Dean C

    @Haldy

    Thanks for the advice chaps! My training track and the competition track are both the Newport Velodrome (where the British squad do a lot of training), so it’s a 250m wooden indoor track.

    I’m hoping my coach will give me a trial run on Friday night to see how I can do. My calculations suggest 1:15 is possible, maybe quicker. But I really don’t know. It’s probably an event that suits me as I like TTing and have some idea of pacing but I’m also a decent sprinter; I naturally have a strong ‘kick’ (the downsides are that on steep hills every single one of my riding partners dances away from me while looking back every now and again to check if I’ve punctured – I haven’t). Plus, I’m all in for pain and suffering.

    I think I could also set myself up with kit pretty well -I have a skinsuit on the way, got a TT helmet and I think I can knock together a track style aero cockpit (bullhorns and aerobars) from things I’ve got kicking around. Then hopefully I will have time to practice a lot – I imagine a lot of the skill is in accellerating fast up to race speed, but not overdoing it. It does intrigue me – sort of thing I can imagine becoming an obsession!

  17. @RobSandy

    Thanks for paving the way for me, sir!

    @Oli

    Roll-out/development probably should be in more common use and I’m sure it will be eventually, but old habits die hard.

    And with Brexit, they will be coming back real fast!

  18. @KogaLover

    Haha, true!

  19. @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    @Haldy

    @RobSandy

    Ahh…the Killermeter….I used to specialize in that back in the days of my youth. I have gone down the endurance path now, and the Madison and Team Pursuit are my favorite events.

    I don’t know that I’ll be any good at it, but it seems a good place to start.

    Any tips?

    Start hitting the weight room! The Kilo along with the match sprint is the realm of the monster quads! The kilo is all about starting out of the gates….and going FULL TILT until you die…then you still have 200m to go…lol

    Here is a great vid of Francois Pervis in 2013. THe start out of the gate is as about as perfect as possible.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rt8lDyKMKsY

    That’s pretty cool. Looks like nothing but pure pain going deep. And it’s just a one minute bike ride ? Cheers

  20. @RobSandy

    My son has been going to BC coached road session on the circuit outside the Lee Valley Velodrome. It’s generally to cold to stand outside watching and they only go past every minute or thereabouts so we’ve been watching the FullGas Track League racing inside. That and your adventures and upcoming tilt at National Glory have got me thinking about getting accredited over the summer to have a crack at racing next year.

    It’s also encouraging to see that there are quite a few blokes in the C races (and even a few in the B races) who are considerably more rotund than I am.

    I’m going to need another bike…

  21. @chris

    I’m a bit frightened of mass start track racing still, hence me considering track TTing.

    The irony is, I can’t race track league because I’m not accredited, and there aren’t any accreditation courses coming up. But I can race the Welsh Track Champs without accreditation. Odd!

  22. @RobSandy

    The Cat C bunch racing looks terrifying, the Cat B slightly less so but in three weeks of watching them wobble and swerve round the track I’ve only seen two crashes and no injuries.

    If I remember correctly, you’ve been in bunch races (on a roadbike) in a velodrome before, it won’t be any worse than that.

    As the who accreditation thing, you’ve got to love the logic of the ruling bodies…

  23. @chris

    @RobSandy

    The Cat C bunch racing looks terrifying, the Cat B slightly less so but in three weeks of watching them wobble and swerve round the track I’ve only seen two crashes and no injuries.

    If I remember correctly, you’ve been in bunch races (on a roadbike) in a velodrome before, it won’t be any worse than that.

    As the who accreditation thing, you’ve got to love the logic of the ruling bodies…

    At least no-one would have brakes indoors. People who brake in crits on oval tracks should be lashed with frame pumps until they’ve really had enough.

  24. @RobSandy

    Thanks for paving the way for me, sir!

    Didn’t get that comment.

    Anyway, here’s my track bike now with new longer seat post, longer stem, track bars and new grips.

    Kierin grips…ribbed for MY pleasure.

  25. Yay! A discussion about track.

    It’s been such a great thing to be able to race track as well as all of the other disciplines I do. Especially good when it’s pissing down outside and my normal training ride is cancelled on a Tuesday or Thursday.

    Melbourne has a really amazing track scene. Really good turnouts on both nights, both Juniors and Seniors.

    The coolest thing is racing against early teenage girls in some of the open races. (They’re fast!!)

    Anyhoo, here’s my bike set up in pursuit mode.

  26. Or not.

    Where’s the photo link button gone?

  27. Ah yes. Log in…

  28. @RobSandy

    @KogaLover

    Thanks for paving the way for me, sir!

    Didn’t get that comment.

    Anyway, here’s my track bike now with new longer seat post, longer stem, track bars and new grips.

    Kierin grips…ribbed for MY pleasure.

    I wanted to thank you for asking all the questions that I otherwise would be asking in a couple of months from now! So by gathering the answers, you paved the way for me.

    And on the ride, that looks sweeeet. You know blue is my favourite color. I recall you saying your bike was old, but this one looks brand new to me. Are those SPD SL Group San pedals?

  29. @KogaLover

    Ah, I getcha now. There’s so much to know – more than you’d think for a bike with no gears and no brakes that just goes round and round a wooden track. I bought a replacement chainring (49t) and discovered that despite measuring the BCD I’d got it wrong; I’d bought 144mm and need 135mm. Of course, 135mm chainrings are fucking expensive.

    If it was a better quality picture you’d see all the dings in the frame, it’s well chipped. But the wheels are lovely. And I’ve added the cockpit and seatpost/saddle, so they are new. And yeah, they are just normal SPD-SL pedals, handed down off my road bike when I upgraded to 105. I only have 1 pair of cycling shoes.

    I’m still thinking if I repainted it in matt white and put some deep section wheels on it’d look pretty modern (aero DT!), EXCEPT, the steerer is 1″ (rather then 1 1/8th”), so I can’t replace the forks.

    Looking forwards to hearing how you get on riding the boards!

  30. @RobSandy

    @RobSandy

    Thanks for paving the way for me, sir!

    Didn’t get that comment.

    Anyway, here’s my track bike now with new longer seat post, longer stem, track bars and new grips.

    Kierin grips…ribbed for MY pleasure.

    Looking good. the frame has nice geometry/proportions. And if it’s got a 1″ steerer, I would definitely be going for a quill stem, but then, I’m a total retro-head. I’m on the lookout out for a steel track frame myself. So far, the hunt has not been going so well.

  31. @DVMR

    I’m of the opposite incination – I’m a total moderniser. I think with a few changes over the next year I can make it look like a modern track bike. It already looks completely different with the track bars (had some horrid too-small ergo road bars on before).

    Also, I’m only really interested in making it go faster.

  32. @RobSandy

    Also, I’m only really interested in making it go faster.

    I always say that it’s not my bike that needs to become lighter, but me. Mutatis mutandis: it’s not your bike that needs to get faster, it’s you

  33. @RobSandy

    @RobSandy

    Thanks for paving the way for me, sir!

    Didn’t get that comment.

    Anyway, here’s my track bike now with new longer seat post, longer stem, track bars and new grips.

    Kierin grips…ribbed for MY pleasure.

    Looks nice but is riding a BC Talent Team bike not on par with wearing pro kit?

  34. @KogaLover

    @RobSandy

    Also, I’m only really interested in making it go faster.

    I always say that it’s not my bike that needs to become lighter, but me. Mutatis mutandis: it’s not your bike that needs to get faster, it’s you

    Touche.

    @chris

    Kierin grips…ribbed for MY pleasure.

    Looks nice but is riding a BC Talent Team bike not on par with wearing pro kit?

    You ever heard that old expression? “Nope”.

    I’m intrigued who it used to belong to though. I’ve seen an identical one on interwebs with Alex Dowsett’s name on it. Think it’s too big a frame to be any obvious candidates locally though (G, Luke Rowe).

  35. ChrisO – Damn, that is awesome. Great photo, great story. But…setting Lillian up with an e-groupsan at such an age? You are in for a world of Budgetatus pain down the line if she gets hooked!

    On another note – what is the feeling on mounting a “be seen” light light a Lezyne Strip on the fork. I prefer to keep my bars clean. Too low for motorists to adequately see? Anyone doing this currently? Thanks.

  36. Have commented on occasion. Thought it only proper to put my bike up.

  37. @Steve T

    Love your machine! Are those 28 or 26 mm tires — interested to know the gap or brake reach on that fork and rear bridge. I am seeing another allroad machine in my future.

  38. I’m going to replace the 135mm BCD crankset on my track bike with a 144mm BCD set. Makes it easier to get chainrings.

    How likely is the new crankset to fit on the existing BB? Says the new ones will fit a 107mm square taper JIS – is this standard for track bikes? I’m slightly concerned that it’s going to have some esoteric BB fitting.

  39. @RobSandy

    I’m going to replace the 135mm BCD crankset on my track bike with a 144mm BCD set. Makes it easier to get chainrings.

    How likely is the new crankset to fit on the existing BB? Says the new ones will fit a 107mm square taper JIS – is this standard for track bikes? I’m slightly concerned that it’s going to have some esoteric BB fitting.

    Assuming the new set is also square taper then JIS is the more common standard. So you should be OK with newer cranks. If they are wrong then the cranks either go too far or not far enough on the spindle. See here for more info.

  40. @universo

    Thanks for the kind words. 25mm tyres – I’ve only switched up to them from 23mm this year. Looks to be plenty of clearance for a 28 (I have 28’s on my commuter so may give it a try).

  41. @RobSandy

    I’m going to replace the 135mm BCD crankset on my track bike with a 144mm BCD set. Makes it easier to get chainrings.

    How likely is the new crankset to fit on the existing BB? Says the new ones will fit a 107mm square taper JIS – is this standard for track bikes? I’m slightly concerned that it’s going to have some esoteric BB fitting.

    Not being cheap- but I would compare the cost and risk of swapping out the original parts vs. finding a good source of 135mm BCD chain rings and buying the 3 or 4 that I would think that I would ever want for that bike. Then ride the thing like I stole it. Keep the extra money in your pocket so when someone at the local velodrome puts up on the “for sale or trade” board their disk wheels you can pounce.

  42. @Dean C

    @RobSandy

    I’m going to replace the 135mm BCD crankset on my track bike with a 144mm BCD set. Makes it easier to get chainrings.

    How likely is the new crankset to fit on the existing BB? Says the new ones will fit a 107mm square taper JIS – is this standard for track bikes? I’m slightly concerned that it’s going to have some esoteric BB fitting.

    Not being cheap- but I would compare the cost and risk of swapping out the original parts vs. finding a good source of 135mm BCD chain rings and buying the 3 or 4 that I would think that I would ever want for that bike. Then ride the thing like I stole it. Keep the extra money in your pocket so when someone at the local velodrome puts up on the “for sale or trade” board their disk wheels you can pounce.

    I agree with Dean C in that I would swap out the minimum amount of parts necessary, but to answer your question a 107mm spindle length is pretty much the standard for track setups to the best of my knowledge. if that’s not what you’ve got already, tange do a very affordable and good quality BB in 107. unless your new cranks are campy, in which case I think they use a different taper.

  43. @DVMR

    @Dean C

    @Haldy

    Thanks for the ongoing advice chaps – had my first session of Kilo training last night, and the first order of business for me was to ride one just to get a feel for the start and the effort required.

    Oh. My. God.

    How can 4 laps cause that much pain? I was quite pleased with the 1st lap but shocked how quickly it got so hard.

    Anyway, the first try was something around 1:15 on the drops with no aero kit (and constantly riding miles above the black line), so something to work with. Also did a flying 500 which was much more fun! I think I’d need a much bigger gear to do a good time for that though.

  44. @RobSandy

    @DVMR

    @Dean C

    @Haldy

    Thanks for the ongoing advice chaps – had my first session of Kilo training last night, and the first order of business for me was to ride one just to get a feel for the start and the effort required.

    Oh. My. God.

    How can 4 laps cause that much pain? I was quite pleased with the 1st lap but shocked how quickly it got so hard.

    Anyway, the first try was something around 1:15 on the drops with no aero kit (and constantly riding miles above the black line), so something to work with. Also did a flying 500 which was much more fun! I think I’d need a much bigger gear to do a good time for that though.

    Sounds like great craic. That’s my kind of Friday night right there. You’re so lucky to have a proper velodrome to use in winter. My local track, which evolved out of a post-war grass track, is closed until February.

  45. @RobSandy

    @DVMR

    @Dean C

    @Haldy

    Thanks for the ongoing advice chaps – had my first session of Kilo training last night, and the first order of business for me was to ride one just to get a feel for the start and the effort required.

    Oh. My. God.

    How can 4 laps cause that much pain? I was quite pleased with the 1st lap but shocked how quickly it got so hard.

    Anyway, the first try was something around 1:15 on the drops with no aero kit (and constantly riding miles above the black line), so something to work with. Also did a flying 500 which was much more fun! I think I’d need a much bigger gear to do a good time for that though.

    this is cool. having a local indoor velodrome would be pretty fun. good for you man!

  46. @DVMR

    @Cary

    Don’t mean to rub it in but I’ve actually got 2 local velodromes – one outdoor about 5 minutes ride away and one indoor about 15 minutes drive away. I have coached sessions Monday outdoors and Friday indoors.

    Could be one reason why South Wales produces so many good track and road cyclists…

  47. With two kiddo’s racing bikes we have the 3N+1 rule in our house. And for last two years my daughter’s been on 49 cm Road Bike and XS Mtn Bike. She’s now north of 5′ 6″ (167 cm) and last week we picked up a 52 cm and a S frame sets for the two bikes.

    So, I often posted that it’s the steel bikes that are the classics and for years and years will always be the classics. And it’ll be the rare C frame that ten or twenty years from now would be considered classic in same way as the steel bikes.

    BUT, with the modern ’17 Cannondale Evo frame set we just picked up I think we snagged a classic forever kinda bike. It’s a super jet black with chrome Cannondale lettering only on the down tube. We’ll finish it with polished silver Ritchey bar, stem and post and with white saddle and bar tape this bike could be timeless. We’ll see. I also suspect it could be sub 15 lbs / 7 kg when built. The DA groupsan we’ll swap over from her current machine is already classic black/silver.

    Also, this bike will be under the tree !!! The best Christmas present. She knows her mtn bike is getting upsized, we’re simply swapping the components off her XS frame to S frame of same model 27.5 hard tail Pivot. Our mtn bike season has started and w/practices underway that’s the bike she’s excited about. But for road bike the plan is to quietly slip her current road bike out of the garage (recall the concept of critical mass) and have it built up at shop just before Christmas eve.

    Such great fun ! Cheers all for the holidays. Hope ya’ll get cool bikes and bike stuff for you and yours.

  48. @Randy C

    With two kiddo’s racing bikes we have the 3N+1 rule in our house. And for last two years my daughter’s been on 49 cm Road Bike and XS Mtn Bike. She’s now north of 5′ 6″ (167 cm) and last week we picked up a 52 cm and a S frame sets for the two bikes.

    So, I often posted that it’s the steel bikes that are the classics and for years and years will always be the classics. And it’ll be the rare C frame that ten or twenty years from now would be considered classic in same way as the steel bikes.

    BUT, with the modern ’17 Cannondale Evo frame set we just picked up I think we snagged a classic forever kinda bike. It’s a super jet black with chrome Cannondale lettering only on the down tube. We’ll finish it with polished silver Ritchey bar, stem and post and with white saddle and bar tape this bike could be timeless. We’ll see. I also suspect it could be sub 15 lbs / 7 kg when built. The DA groupsan we’ll swap over from her current machine is already classic black/silver.

    Also, this bike will be under the tree !!! The best Christmas present. She knows her mtn bike is getting upsized, we’re simply swapping the components off her XS frame to S frame of same model 27.5 hard tail Pivot. Our mtn bike season has started and w/practices underway that’s the bike she’s excited about. But for road bike the plan is to quietly slip her current road bike out of the garage (recall the concept of critical mass) and have it built up at shop just before Christmas eve.

    Such great fun ! Cheers all for the holidays. Hope ya’ll get cool bikes and bike stuff for you and yours.

    this is the coolest thing ever! happy holidays!

  49. Merry Christmas to all! This arrived straight from Craig Northam of BUCKIT up-cycled bicycle-tyre products, Australia — handmade 1980’s WOLBER TEAM Tubular strap to replace an exact TID strap.

  50. foto is not so good { looks orange red, but is WOLBER Velominati orange } better fotos to be posted at TID

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar