Anatomy Of A Photo: Where Do We Go From Here?

Anatomy Of A Photo: Where Do We Go From Here?

by / / 96 posts

A great unknown awaits the young men, bound by a common entity of steel, flesh and passion rolled together. Do they contemplate the future, or are they so encapsulated in the here and now that anything beyond the finish line seems like it could only be for old people? Have they any inkling which path they will take, or be guided towards? Maybe the only thing on their mind is just how badass their eyewear is.

What ambition burns within, do they believe they will be, or even seek to be, a cycling superstar; which of them knows it? Maybe ambition isn’t considered, not part of the equation. The simple act of pedalling a bicycle may remain one of joy, of freedom, or become a mistress so harsh that she is eventually despised, and thrown aside, banished to but a bitter memory of a time better forgotten. Who will be remembered, and who will even want to remember?

When a pastime becomes a job a certain element, that of detachment, is lost forever. Making your passion your profession is fraught with risk, and the balance of work/play becomes ever more critical to cultivating satisfaction within, lest you be eternally damned to harming the very thing once loved more than anything else. Keeping things Casually Deliberate is a failsafe, a safety net below the trapeze on which the real world swings precariously.

Stay passionate. Rock cool shit and ride your bike like it’s your lover. Everything will be alright.

// Anatomy of a Photo // Nostalgia

  1. @tessar

    @Buck Rogers

    she just lost all cycling respect with me as the only thing that is tough about the cycling event in tri’s is that they are all ITT’s.

    Err, you do realize, I hope, that the race being a draft-legal event means it’s done on road bikes and effectively becomes a 40km crit between a hard swim and a hard run? Most likely it wasn’t her case, but for elite athletes the cycling leg of a triathlon is raced hard. Not that I’m disagreeing with your main point, but it just shows both of you love a sport and have no clue how hard the other one is.Most endurance sports, when raced to your limit, are hard. Dare I say it, the difference in difficulty is not huge. It’s just that with cycling the difference between giving up and going on is a bit more pronounced, and you have less of a choice about the timing – and thanks to the draft effect of a pack, we can survive for longer with athletes stronger than us.

    Yes and here’s a non-draft event.

    Spot the difference.

    I hear that at the World 70.3 Championships last month it was like the Tour Peleton.

  2. @tessar

    @Buck Rogers

    she just lost all cycling respect with me as the only thing that is tough about the cycling event in tri’s is that they are all ITT’s.

    Err, you do realize, I hope, that the race being a draft-legal event means it’s done on road bikes and effectively becomes a 40km crit between a hard swim and a hard run? Most likely it wasn’t her case, but for elite athletes the cycling leg of a triathlon is raced hard. Not that I’m disagreeing with your main point, but it just shows both of you love a sport and have no clue how hard the other one is.Most endurance sports, when raced to your limit, are hard. Dare I say it, the difference in difficulty is not huge. It’s just that with cycling the difference between giving up and going on is a bit more pronounced, and you have less of a choice about the timing – and thanks to the draft effect of a pack, we can survive for longer with athletes stronger than us.

    HEY Man!!! Stop bringing any reason to my ranting on Triathletes! Geeesh. Soon he’ll be asking us all to read the word-thingies that go with the pictures on these pages.

  3. @tessar But I do have to say that you mentioned Triathletes (Triwads–like that one) in the same paragraph as criteriums. Now that sounds like a wheelbuilders DREAM right there. Nothing like late 30’s-to-mid-40’s Triwads to drop $1,000’s of dollars on shit they have no real knowledge of b/c they “read” in Triathlete” or “Bicycling” Magazine that it would save them 3 seconds in their next race, which always seems to be only against themselves. Besides the amazing Pro Triwads, it seems most Triwads are late-30’s-to-early-40’s people who are trying to have a last gasp at being an “Athlete” My buddy, who was in that class and realized it, always would chant “Swim-Bike-Run…We’re good at none” during his Tri’s. That that fucker!

  4. @Buck Rogers

    “Swim-Bike-Run…We’re good at none”

    Now that there is funny!!

  5. @Buck Rogers

    Swim-Bike-Run…We’re good at none

    Ha ha! WIN!

  6. @ChrisO

    @tessar

    @Buck Rogers

    she just lost all cycling respect with me as the only thing that is tough about the cycling event in tri’s is that they are all ITT’s.

    Err, you do realize, I hope, that the race being a draft-legal event means it’s done on road bikes and effectively becomes a 40km crit between a hard swim and a hard run? Most likely it wasn’t her case, but for elite athletes the cycling leg of a triathlon is raced hard. Not that I’m disagreeing with your main point, but it just shows both of you love a sport and have no clue how hard the other one is.Most endurance sports, when raced to your limit, are hard. Dare I say it, the difference in difficulty is not huge. It’s just that with cycling the difference between giving up and going on is a bit more pronounced, and you have less of a choice about the timing – and thanks to the draft effect of a pack, we can survive for longer with athletes stronger than us.

    Yes and here’s a non-draft event.

    Spot the difference.

    I hear that at the World 70.3 Championships last month it was like the Tour Peleton.

    And here’s an athlete never caught doping, displaying grace and style on the bike. *cough*

    Both sports have their cheaters, both fail at dealing with them. So?

    Back to the difficulty discussion – those guys look like a pretty average bunch of “complete, not compete” folks. Visor on your helmet and Oakley glasses hanging from his neck? Two aero helmets out of 8 folks? A fair comparison would be these guys:

    I heard people walk in cyclosportives!

  7. Here is a photo from the other side of the career

  8. Every once in a while at an organized charity ride I’m doing, some tri-chicks (yes, I know I’ll get into trouble for using that kinda language, but it’s way better than some terms that have been bandied about on this site), show up. Man, they scare me. They also ride bikes and gear I could never afford. Mind you, I take solace in the fact that I’m better dressed than they are . . .

  9. @rfreese888

    Here is a photo from the other side of the career

    Well, the guy on the right’s palmares are a wee bit scanty, but I get your point.

    Speaking of M. Thevenet and M. Merckx, I read that the Tour might be doing Pra Loup next year, eh? It’s been a while since “the showdown” of 75. It would be nice to see something similar in 15.

  10. @wiscot Note the halo around The Prophet and the French ‘blessing’ streaming behind Le Blaireau. Bobet’s face looks towards the past, Coppi’s to the future

  11. @Buck Rogers

    @tessar But I do have to say that you mentioned Triathletes (Triwads-like that one) in the same paragraph as criteriums. Now that sounds like a wheelbuilders DREAM right there. Nothing like late 30’s-to-mid-40’s Triwads to drop $1,000’s of dollars on shit they have no real knowledge of b/c they “read” in Triathlete” or “Bicycling” Magazine that it would save them 3 seconds in their next race, which always seems to be only against themselves. Besides the amazing Pro Triwads, it seems most Triwads are late-30’s-to-early-40’s people who are trying to have a last gasp at being an “Athlete” My buddy, who was in that class and realized it, always would chant “Swim-Bike-Run…We’re good at none” during his Tri’s. That that fucker!

    I’m not anti-roadie. I’m a proper cyclist on my proper bike, and on my triathlon bike – well, I try to minimize the damage (and train with proper kit). The point I was trying to get across is that a triathlete overblowing the difficulty of his race is not that different from some of the posts and musings on this very site. Masturbating (for lack of a better word) about how hard you suck at three disciplines is the same as the self-congratulatory posts about riding in nasty weather. We all do it, some more and some less, but both are ridiculous when viewed by an outsider, and the length of our sleeves (or lack thereof) won’t make our lycra-clad selves more appealing to the general population.

    PS: The biggest percentage of high-end (road and mountain) bike purchases is done by… 40-50 year olds. Midlife crises have many ways to show. I worked for Assos – which is, after all, as snobbish-roadie as it gets. Our most popular sizes were XL and XXL, and most customers had a belly bigger than Robert Forstemann’s quads and less hair than Bjarne Riis.

    PS2: Spot on, by the way, about triathletes buying $3000 Zipps to improve by 3 seconds. It’s quite satisfying to think my entire bike cost less than one wheel as I’m wooshing past. On the other hand, Weight Weenies.

  12. Buck – NICE rant! I loved that. It’s amazing how different sports have become in such a short, short time. What I’ve seen is that you’re either an “all in” athlete now and you focus on one sport, go to coaching camps, have a coach, only eat Gatorade-approved foods, etc. Or, you’re chubby, lazy, and can’t jog and chew gum at the same time. No in between. Specialization, just like most other areas. It’s fuckin’ weird to me. I’m not even going to start on the fuckers who mocked and disdained sports for the first 35 years of life, then decided to give them a go, then went all in on gear and other shite, but still are just soft sonofabitches.

    Speak of…my VMH’s boss just won a Try in her age group. She told my VMH she wants to ride with me so she can train with someone faster on the bike. I hope this happens, so I can punish her like crazy for being so unkind to my wife daily at work. She’s definitely not athletic, so I wonder exactly how competitive this Try was.

    Frank – NICE! I love picking up something new, like shades, that just make you want to get out and ride. It could be anything, even new socks. But you get home, you don’t feel like heading out, maybe, then you say, “Fuck it, I’ve got a classy steel steed and some goddamn Eyeshades. Let’s roll.”

  13. @ChrisO

    @girl

    The whole ‘hate on triathtes’ is becoming like the helmet/not helmet discussion.

    Oh come on… there are two valid sides to the helmet debate.

    HA! Nice work, Chris. Nice work.

  14. @wiscot

    I think COTHO has a look of “I wish I had worn darker shades that might have dimmed the spectacle of Dr. Phil’s soiled, bulging Mom jeans.” He certainly looks a little queasy . . .

    Man, you are on fire! And winter hasn’t even set in to keep you off the road and busy entertaining us. Strong work.

    I don’t own or wear denim, so those pantalones make me extra-queasy.

  15. @antihero

    Interesting how our own experience informs our assumptions, isn’t it? Clearly you have neither the skill nor the wherewithal to take photos while climbing.

    @unversio

    They are not Rotundos; they are ttt old stock somethingorothers that have the Merckx bend, positioned level.

  16. @extra special and bitter

    I thought that was a key reason for hating “Pharmy”; because of his love for all thing tri.

    I don’t know about others, but I hate him because he’s such a douchebag. Not for his doping or for loving Tri, though it doesn’t make the case any stronger.

    @girl

    The whole ‘hate on triathtes’ is becoming like the helmet/not helmet discussion.

    I agree. Its very tiring.

  17. There are douchebags in all sports. I can’t say there is a greater than average incidence in the Tri world, but maybe I’m biased.

    The question as to whether a tri is tougher or easier than a crit is irrelevant – it all depends on how much V the athlete is willing to lay down.

    One of the Brownlee brothers collapsed yards from the end of the race a few years ago and could not get over the line. Now either you can say HTFU, or you can say that he totally drained the V bank and merely got the timing wrong!

    End of Tri support – back to normal service.

    DAvid

  18. @frank

    I don’t know about others, but I hate him because he’s such a douchebag. Not for his doping or for loving Tri, though it doesn’t make the case any stronger.

    I assumed the douche-baggery came from the tri-background, but I guess they just went hand in hand.

  19. @frank Sorry man, but it’s not my fault. A Try-wad made me do it!

  20. @wiscot

    Every once in a while at an organized charity ride I’m doing, some tri-chicks (yes, I know I’ll get into trouble for using that kinda language, but it’s way better than some terms that have been bandied about on this site), show up. Man, they scare me. They also ride bikes and gear I could never afford. Mind you, I take solace in the fact that I’m better dressed than they are . . .

    An amusing one of these I experienced last summer was a guy probably half my age in a sportive with TT bars, aero-helmet and polka dot jersey. He must also have been doing the short route as I passed him twice, ironically both times going uphill.

  21. @Buck Rogers

    @frank Sorry man, but it’s not my fault. A Try-wad made me do it!

    Come on guys (and gals) if it wasn’t for @Bret ranting about the length of posts (and lack of pictures) and @Buck Rogers just ranting this place would be lacking a certain je ne sais pas.

  22. @Teocalli Ha! You know, they’ve offered me meds multiple times but I just keep figuring what a boring place my world would be on them and also how boring it would be for all those poor Bastards that have to share it with me!

  23. @Teocalli

    @wiscot

    Every once in a while at an organized charity ride I’m doing, some tri-chicks (yes, I know I’ll get into trouble for using that kinda language, but it’s way better than some terms that have been bandied about on this site), show up. Man, they scare me. They also ride bikes and gear I could never afford. Mind you, I take solace in the fact that I’m better dressed than they are . . .

    An amusing one of these I experienced last summer was a guy probably half my age in a sportive with TT bars, aero-helmet and polka dot jersey. He must also have been doing the short route as I passed him twice, ironically both times going uphill.

    Yeah, there should be some kind of law, not just a rule, but a law, about wearing an aero helmet unless you are actually competing in a race.

    Back in my racing days I wore one of the early Cinelli aero helmets when racing, but NEVER when not racing. That would have been too ludicrous to contemplate.

  24. @frank

    @unversio

    They are not Rotundos; they are ttt old stock somethingorothers that have the Merckx bend, positioned level.

    Just recently learned that Rotundos are considered a shallow round bend. What you are saying is that these are a deep bend — Merckx 158mm drop. Thanx

  25. Ok, its tired but this also doesn’t help the case.

  26. @Teocalli

    @wiscot

    Every once in a while at an organized charity ride I’m doing, some tri-chicks (yes, I know I’ll get into trouble for using that kinda language, but it’s way better than some terms that have been bandied about on this site), show up. Man, they scare me. They also ride bikes and gear I could never afford. Mind you, I take solace in the fact that I’m better dressed than they are . . .

    An amusing one of these I experienced last summer was a guy probably half my age in a sportive with TT bars, aero-helmet and polka dot jersey. He must also have been doing the short route as I passed him twice, ironically both times going uphill.

    I refuse to ride/near with someone with tri bars and/or without socks

  27. @Teocalli

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Come on guys (and gals) if it wasn’t for @Bret ranting about the length of posts (and lack of pictures) and @Buck Rogers just ranting this place would be lacking a certain je ne sais pas.

    Eh what? Did I miss something?

  28. @brett

    @Teocalli

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Come on guys (and gals) if it wasn’t for @Bret ranting about the length of posts (and lack of pictures) and @Buck Rogers just ranting this place would be lacking a certain je ne sais pas.

    Eh what? Did I miss something?

    Je ne sais pas either!

  29. @Teocalli

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank Sorry man, but it’s not my fault. A Try-wad made me do it!

    Come on guys (and gals) if it wasn’t for @Bret ranting about the length of posts (and lack of pictures) and @Buck Rogers just ranting this place would be lacking a certain je ne sais pas.

    Don’t forget @Gianni testing the limits of Rules compliance… and posting pics of that saddle of his.

  30. @brett

    @Teocalli

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Come on guys (and gals) if it wasn’t for @Bret ranting about the length of posts (and lack of pictures) and @Buck Rogers just ranting this place would be lacking a certain je ne sais pas.

    Eh what? Did I miss something?

    My point exactly? Damn I nearly added some punctuation there.

  31. @ChrisO

    @girl

    The whole ‘hate on triathtes’ is becoming like the helmet/not helmet discussion.

    Oh come on… there are two valid sides to the helmet debate.

    Snap to you! :)

  32. @frank

    Ok, its tired but this also doesn’t help the case.

    No, it doesn’t. At least the spectators know it, why do you think they are all standing at transition? Purely to watch the carnage.

  33. @VeloVita

    I can certainly forgive the helmets as this was 1989, but for fuck’s sake, who was responsible (or irresponsible) for that kit design? And why doesn’t Pharmy have to wear team shorts?

    I have never understood USA kit… It’s always hideous.

  34. Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Oh ya I remember, I’m so glad I stopped racing before those helmet and the guy to the right is Bill Woodhall (?) I think. He was a fabulous mechanic who wrenched at the Red Zinger races and national team events, home and abroad. He worked out of a loaded station wagon with all campy tool, with the Campy logo and Italian colors covering the whole thing. Steve Tilfords web page has a picture of it and Bill back in the day.

  35. @Rob

    Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Glad it reads like fun as that is the way it is intended.

    Racing: same, same, different, same. All racing has a mental side to it. Whatever the race, if you’ve done the training, race day is 90% mental. I’d even go so far as to say there are tactics in tri but I know that will push many of you over the edge. (If that comment alone pushes you over the edge I can’t wait to read the brain explosions posted here after i finish my pedal with the LBS boys.)

  36. @frank:

    @antihero

    Interesting how our own experience informs our assumptions, isn’t it? Clearly you have neither the skill nor the wherewithal to take photos while climbing.

    Easy, cowboy. Looks like I touched a nerve.

    On the contrary, I possess mad skillz sufficient to permit the consumption of a four-course meal, with wine pairings, whilst climbing the Tourmalet.

  37. @therealpeel

    I have never understood USA kit… It’s always hideous.

    Shoot me down in flames if you like, but I can’t think of a single US addition to sartorial elegance that passes muster. Baseball cap? – whatever angle of rotation its worn, the wearer looks like a moron . “Hawaii shirts”? Ok when drunk at the beach with little chance of meeting anyone you know/want to impress. Denim jeans? Oh come on, work clothes. Stetson? Member of the Village People.

    I now give up. Feel free to add to the list, or try a futile attempt to defend any of these. Just remember I hold the trump card and will *always* win.

  38. @girl

    @Rob

    Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Glad it reads like fun as that is the way it is intended.

    Racing: same, same, different, same. All racing has a mental side to it. Whatever the race, if you’ve done the training, race day is 90% mental. I’d even go so far as to say there are tactics in tri but I know that will push many of you over the edge. (If that comment alone pushes you over the edge I can’t wait to read the brain explosions posted here after i finish my pedal with the LBS boys.)

    Yes to it reading as fun, @ChrisO’s riposte too! And I post with the true expectation that no one takes my word or thoughts as anything but an opinion and usually a large dose of tongue in cheek.

    Having said that, I want to state clearly that Tri is no less a sport but unfortunately its preponderance of twats at the cat 5 end (or whatever the Tri equivalent) gives it a bad name! Also, of course it has tactics as does mountain biking and cyclocross. The point is in those three disciplines the tactics are to RR as checkers is to chess.

    End!

  39. @Rob

    @girl

    @Rob

    Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Glad it reads like fun as that is the way it is intended.

    Racing: same, same, different, same. All racing has a mental side to it. Whatever the race, if you’ve done the training, race day is 90% mental. I’d even go so far as to say there are tactics in tri but I know that will push many of you over the edge. (If that comment alone pushes you over the edge I can’t wait to read the brain explosions posted here after i finish my pedal with the LBS boys.)

    Yes to it reading as fun, @ChrisO’s riposte too! And I post with the true expectation that no one takes my word or thoughts as anything but an opinion and usually a large dose of tongue in cheek.

    Having said that, I want to state clearly that Tri is no less a sport but unfortunately its preponderance of twats at the cat 5 end (or whatever the Tri equivalent) gives it a bad name! Also, of course it has tactics as does mountain biking and cyclocross. The point is in those three disciplines the tactics are to RR as checkers is to chess.

    End!

    Cadidiot! Awesome! Fuck, that’s classic!

    Also, Brother, Think about a trip to Maine next third week in June. Cogal write-up coming soon, right Gianni?!?!?!

  40. @Rob

    @girl

    @Rob

    Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Glad it reads like fun as that is the way it is intended.

    Racing: same, same, different, same. All racing has a mental side to it. Whatever the race, if you’ve done the training, race day is 90% mental. I’d even go so far as to say there are tactics in tri but I know that will push many of you over the edge. (If that comment alone pushes you over the edge I can’t wait to read the brain explosions posted here after i finish my pedal with the LBS boys.)

    Yes to it reading as fun, @ChrisO’s riposte too! And I post with the true expectation that no one takes my word or thoughts as anything but an opinion and usually a large dose of tongue in cheek.

    Having said that, I want to state clearly that Tri is no less a sport but unfortunately its preponderance of twats at the cat 5 end (or whatever the Tri equivalent) gives it a bad name! Also, of course it has tactics as does mountain biking and cyclocross. The point is in those three disciplines the tactics are to RR as checkers is to chess.

    End!

    Correct and agreed.

  41. @Rob i think you will find a pic of that wagon somewhere in this thread: http://www.velominati.com/nostalgia/anatomy-of-a-photo-campagnolo-candy-van/

  42. @markb I have a Hawaiian “shirt” jersey. Club fit too! Thrift store find, from Performance. I like to wear it on Friday fun rides. Aside from the obvious awesomeness, should I get fat, the Club Fit provides room to grow.

  43. @antihero

    @frank:

    @antihero

    Interesting how our own experience informs our assumptions, isn’t it? Clearly you have neither the skill nor the wherewithal to take photos while climbing.

    Easy, cowboy. Looks like I touched a nerve.

    On the contrary, I possess mad skillz sufficient to permit the consumption of a four-course meal, with wine pairings, whilst climbing the Tourmalet.

    Reminded me of this:

    “Racing was at its hardest when the stands were full. Riders took it easy when they were empty and circled the track reading newspapers, talking, even writing letters as they pedalled with one foot, the other steering the handlebars” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six-day_racing

  44. @Buck Rogers

    @Rob

    @girl

    @Rob

    Ok, I can’t remember what the original article is about but I’m enjoying the @Girl coment – snap back at @ChisO and as usual @Buck you kill me. That little cadidiot should be tied to a link of the old chain that spanned the Hudson and thrown in for a swim!

    If I have to comment on RR vs Tri they are both hard but one has a mental side and has tactics that dictate whether or not you kill yourself to stay in the race. Guess which one? Also and then I’ll shut up, it’s not like your bike handling like Cavendish in a Tri. Legal drafting in a Tri race does not change the equation because there is no sprint for the line for places… First through one hundred are just trying to stay in the pack – whoopee! Yes they swim and run and it’s the training that is harder but once in the race, any leg, it’s just a matter of not red lining like the kid mentioned above.

    Glad it reads like fun as that is the way it is intended.

    Racing: same, same, different, same. All racing has a mental side to it. Whatever the race, if you’ve done the training, race day is 90% mental. I’d even go so far as to say there are tactics in tri but I know that will push many of you over the edge. (If that comment alone pushes you over the edge I can’t wait to read the brain explosions posted here after i finish my pedal with the LBS boys.)

    Yes to it reading as fun, @ChrisO’s riposte too! And I post with the true expectation that no one takes my word or thoughts as anything but an opinion and usually a large dose of tongue in cheek.

    Having said that, I want to state clearly that Tri is no less a sport but unfortunately its preponderance of twats at the cat 5 end (or whatever the Tri equivalent) gives it a bad name! Also, of course it has tactics as does mountain biking and cyclocross. The point is in those three disciplines the tactics are to RR as checkers is to chess.

    End!

    Cadidiot! Awesome! Fuck, that’s classic!

    Also, Brother, Think about a trip to Maine next third week in June. Cogal write-up coming soon, right Gianni?!?!?!

    Whoooeee – I’m IN. Just give me a time and a place!

    P.S. http://www.combat.ws/S4/MILTERMS/WP0SLANG.HTM

    – so glad we can’t do stupid embarrassed silly faces. Just don’t go overboard with this new knowledge or the plebes are going to think your way not cool…

  45. @Beers it looks like he put on his smoking slippers for a snack, a cigar and a kip? I only have seen one six and that was a modern one ( I’m not that old) – only 4-5 hours a day and of that only a couple of hours of Madison. The rest was entertaining devil take the hindmost, scratch races and the like for points and dosh. It would be great to get to Amsterdam or Rotterdam one of these winters…

  46. @Rob Is your email still the one at fairpoint.net?

  47. @Buck Rogers the same but gmail.com – fairpoint.net is dead to me.

  48. @Rob

    @Buck Rogers the same but gmail.com – fairpoint.net is dead to me.

    Tracking. Just sent you a test email to establish contact.

  49. @wiscot

    Every once in a while at an organized charity ride I’m doing, some tri-chicks (yes, I know I’ll get into trouble for using that kinda language, but it’s way better than some terms that have been bandied about on this site), show up. Man, they scare me. They also ride bikes and gear I could never afford. Mind you, I take solace in the fact that I’m better dressed than they are . . .

    We have a few Tri dudes in our bunch. They’re cool because they are always in the bunch. They race with us too so know how to ride in a bunch, how to roll a pace line and all that. Then you get the tri-wads who roll onto the back of the bunch while we are doing a kick arse pace line and decide to join in unannounced and uninvited. After getting over being told to get the fuck off the aero-bars in the bunch, they get to the front of the pace line and decide, wow, these guys roll off easy.. I’ll show them and take off hard thinking they are teaching us a lesson. Well, they just get left there which compounds their idea that they are kick arse and use roadies can’t come around. Eventually they tire and the pace line starts again rolling past them. They’re pretty smug off the front but they never seem to be there for the sprint… One day I hope they might learn but they never do.

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