No animals were harmed during this 16okm solo Giro win. Photo Graeme Watson

No animals were harmed during this 16okm solo Giro win. Photo Graeme Watson

V to the Vth Degree

by / / 74 posts

La Vie Velominatus isn’t a part-time gig. La Vie means the life, and The V is my life. Otherwise, I’d be Some V Velominatus, some of the time.

Even when I’m not riding my bike, like the last two weeks (for reasons which don’t really matter, and offering them only renders them excuses), I live La Vie through other avenues. Every day, no matter what I’m putting out, the only thing I’m putting in is V. I’m a Vegan. And like everything else that La Vie encompasses, it takes commitment.

Choosing to not eat meat, dairy or animal products usually elicits reactions ranging from surprise to condemnation. When it comes to riding a bike, being a V-tarian has benefitted me no end. Animal protein and fat doesn’t help one to spin pedals for hours on end. The proof is in the (dairy-free) pudding. This summer just past and the build-up to Keepers Tour was my best patch of form for a long time. Granted, it may not be entirely due to my diet, but it certainly didn’t hurt me. My endurance was excellent, I laid down plenty of V, felt light and strong on the climbs and recovery wasn’t a problem (malted, hopped beverages always work). And the riders on KT will attest to that fact. Never have I thought “if only I ate meat I’d be a better rider.” It works for me.

We all make choices in our life, and how to live it. I’ve made mine, and am sticking to them. And if for some unfathomable reason that offends you, then that’s for you to deal with, not me. I’m living La Vie for me (and the animals).

VLVV

Article: Cav, R Millar, Yates, DZ, Tjallingi

// La Vie Velominatus

  1. If someone makes a conscious ethical decision to be veg, I’ll never say a bad word. If someone dresses the decision up in pseudoscience and then moralizes about it, I get cranky.

    Personally, I’m a meatasaur but a different kind than I was a few years ago. Most of the meat I eat now was either wild–and killed and butchered by moi–or humanely raised on a small organic farm by a friend. I’m okay with that. I’m also okay with the habits and decisions of my friends who choose differently.

  2. Brett, having always thought of you as a take no shite and bite de heads off kind of guy, it is nice to know that you can be so forthright and be a veggie. My VHM and I come close, she eats nothing with 4 feet and I eat very little in that direction. The industrial world and animals are not a good mix. Words like factory, battery, and cows that never leave a stall are a crime. We could do it well or at least raise animals humanely but until we all change our diets to a more moderate one it will never happen.

    Really there is no easy answer with 7+ billion although if the western world started to eat insects for protein…

  3. I’d be totally down with insect protein shakes in the morning, if the food scientists got on that. Which they won’t, until their corporate masters can patent the GMO bugs…

  4. @Marcus

    @brett

    Scientific fact: 9 out of 10 vegetarians prefer recumbents.

    Luckily, I’m the 1.

  5. @Ron

    @scaler911

    @PeakInTwoYears

    @Rob

    +1. You all get it.

  6. Definitely local butchers give better cuts, and usually they are from local farms.  Same thing with farmer’s markets and such.  Most people just don’t care or would rather have “steak” every night on the cheap.

    @brett

    Don’t you rock fi'zi:k shoes?  Poor baby ‘roos.  (emoticon goes here)

  7. Right on Bretto. I believe friend of Velominati, Robert Millar was (is?) a vegetarian when he was racing and did he get a lot of shiet about it back then. And he still kicked asses.

  8. @DerHoggz

    Definitely local butchers give better cuts, and usually they are from local farms. Same thing with farmer’s markets and such. Most people just don’t care or would rather have “steak” every night on the cheap.

    @brett

    Don’t you rock fi’zi:k shoes? Poor baby ‘roos. (emoticon goes here)

    You get it too.

    Indeed, I did rock fi'zi:k shoes… but they got lost on the way to KT, and I’m not keen to rock them again because of that. Of course it’s hypocritical to wear dead animals but not eat them, so I’m hopefully getting non-leather replacements.

  9. @Rob My thoughts as well pretty much.

    My wife is from a certain part of Asia that has the longest lifespans of anyone on the planet.  This doesn’t come from snacking on dried hoofed meat or XXXL take aways.A lot of their food is locally sourced and they take great pride in stating that this vegetable is grown by a certain local farmer for example.
    Through this our families diet has changed significantly over the years to a more plant based one, with animal protein as a flavouring rather then the main course. All of us are the better for it and it certainly hasn’t affected my cycling life.

     Interestingly in her home country they they drink like fish as well from what I have seen; so the morale of the story..eat less land animals, more vegetables and seafood and drink way more booze to live longer

  10. @DerHoggz Spot on.  I like my meat but it’s quality before quantity.  We had a local butcher open in the neighborhood recently and when meat is on the menu that is where it comes from.

  11. The son has been a state champion twice…. and he’s vegan. I couldn’t be prouder.

  12. I used to be veggie for many years, and still eat a mainly non-meat diet – but I will have fish mainly and sometimes ham or chicken.

    I found it difficult to remain veggie when I was doing a lot of travelling and business lunches – it got a bit dull to always be having the one thing on the menu that was suitable for vegetarians, usually involving goat’s cheese. Not having dairy would be a nightmare, so I admire your persistence.

    It’s not an issue as far as I’m concerned, and I could never understand why meat-eaters had an issue with vegetarian meals at dinners or restaurants, as if they found it compulsory to have meat at every occasion. So for once you’re having a vegetarian lasagne – does it taste nice ? Yes… well, end of story.

    My wife is still veggie as are two of the three children – I tell the meat-eater not to rub it in the noses of the others, and equally I tell them not to sit there with a look of disgust and try to put him off.

    Respect other people’s choices, innit.

  13. Good for you Brett. Couldn’t really give a fuck what someone eats to be honest, if it works for you, great! Variety is the spice of life, and all that.

    I’m not going to hassle you for being vego, just as I would expect not to be hassled for being omnivorous. Hopefully you’re not putting all omnivoures in the ‘ignorant’ basket. ‘Ignorant’ generally comes around when two opposing sides get defensive about what they do.

    I’m conscious that way back primitive times when people lived in isolated villages, what you ate would have been luck. Live on the prairie? Buffalo for you. Blessed with natural fruit orchards? Fruit for you. Root vegies growing wild? Mondo carbs for you. An island in the middle of nowhere? Fish for you. Tree nuts and seeds? Regular movements for you. The human body is very adaptable and clearly can run on many different fuels, it’s only adding conscious thought and therefore opinion about things like diet that makes things fucked up! One choice is therefore no more special than another. They all can work! And your form obv proves that.

  14. Just reminded me a local burger joint makes a killer Satay veggie burger. All this talk of food is making me hungus…

  15. @brett When you visit Seattle next, I’ll take you to the vegetarian place I ate at tonight. Amazing food. I eat there regularly and I’m not even vegetarian.

    Good cocktails, too. In my opinion, some of the best in Seattle.

  16. I’ve been influenced by one of my (grown) daughters, who is a passionate student and practitioner of traditional Asian healing arts and Tibetan Buddhism. I’ve watched her go from a somewhat rigid (and temporary) set of food rules to a more flexible and yet more conscious approach to what she eats.

    On the Mahayana side of the dharma thing, I have loved, loved reading, and reading about, Shunryu Suzuki.  He was such a character, such a great person to introduce Zen to US culture.  “I like work trips. I don’t like food trips. But I like work trips.”  “Don’t kill is a dead precept. Excuse me is an actual working precept.”  Excuse me. I beg your forgiveness.

    @ChrisO: “Respect other people’s choices.” I.e., let’s be friends. That should be the objective, IMO. 

    Teaching, if teaching there be, is best done by example.  

  17. What a nice little veggo love-in this is!

    I’m a meat eater with no real knowledge of where my food comes from or what experience the animals have had before I chew…that makes me common in my culture but an uncommon Velominatus it seems.

    Yesterday at the supermarket there was no chicken breast and I was able to choose from a wide selection of other meats including kangaroo and camel. My choice was based on fat content, taste and price. In the end I found some packets of ‘organic’ chicken but I have no way of knowing what that actually amounts to. It tasted like chicken. Maybe that’s ethically vacuous but I’ve grown to be cynical enough not to think that ‘people power’ can take on the government – big business alliance and make any difference to the bottom line…I feel totally disempowered because I basicaly am. There, I said it.

    I’m suprised as fuck by Tjallingii’s diet. Not that he’s veggo but that he doesn’t really eat protein. How doesn’t he waste to nothing? Clearly I’m no dietician. Maybe I should try it out – I’m pretty much plateaued on cutting weight and riding speed.

    I’m not trying to be the smart arse here. I’m firmly in the ‘respect choices’ camp. Just trying to contribute balance…

  18. @Harminator

    I’m not trying to be the smart arse here. I’m firmly in the ‘respect choices’ camp. Just trying to contribute balance…

    One way to experience “balance” is to cook and eat the meat of an animal that you shot and watched die, and that you cut into pieces with blood up to your elbows and carried out of the hills on your back and spent two nights butchering and packaging for storage so you could eat it over the next few months. It gets personal that way, and personally I think that’s a good way to experience some of the real costs of eating animal protein. In my experience, when you feel the costs, you feel the value.

    But–in the interest of balance–I will not imagine that the tofu/tempeh I put in my stir-fry a couple of times a week is cost-free. I’ve lived where soy is grown, and it’s not a pretty sight at all.  A monocrop from asphalt to asphalt, nothing left for wildlife, even the birds deprived of a living. That sucks, too.

    But, shit, I love cycling again. Even today in repulsive weather, I felt good on my bike, even while bitching to myself about the rain and road grime like a little pain in my own ass.  Vive la Vie.

  19. @Harminator

    “Yesterday at the supermarket there was no chicken breast and I was able to choose from a wide selection of other meats including kangaroo and camel. My choice was based on fat content, taste and price. In the end I found some packets of ‘organic’ chicken but I have no way of knowing what that actually amounts to. It tasted like chicken. Maybe that’s ethically vacuous but I’ve grown to be cynical enough not to think that ‘people power’ can take on the government – big business alliance and make any difference to the bottom line…I feel totally disempowered because I basicaly am. There, I said it.”

    you have the answer right there, your power lies in your purchasing, because that’s what makes a difference to the bottom line. The best vote you have is your currency, that’s what counts so if you want to make a difference “show me the money”

  20. As the son of an Australian farm boy and a German village girl, a plate of food without meat wasn’t a meal when I was growing up.  I changed a few things a couple of years ago — meat maybe once or twice a week, more fish, cutting out added sugar, fast food, cow’s milk and plain wheat, less alcohol, then more veggies, especially the green leafy kind, seeds and nuts, pulses, beans and complex grains — and noticed big changes to my energy levels, strength, resistance to illness, digestion, appetite and weight stability.

    Cycling is what I love to do on roads; off-road, I’m more like to be running, and being involved in that scene has exposed me to people like Scott Jurek, whose book Eat & Run is a really interesting look at elite endurance performance on a vegan diet.  I think there are lots of things for an omnivore to take from this, and there’s no reason things like quinoa, lentils and tempeh shouldn’t be part of a meat-eaters regular diet.

    I’m a bit resistant to the tendency of athletes to refer to food as ‘fuel’, however if it gets people thinking about the quality of energy they’re putting into their systems and the effect it has on output, it might be a good thing.

  21. In a past life I did some work on behalf of lobby groups, specifically chicken producers and farmers. While I have a lot of respect and time for most farmers, the things the lobbyists wanted to be allowed to do would make Marcus choke on his pet donkey. Free range is a perfectly meaningless term in Aus, unlike NZ; with poultry there is no discernible difference in taste, which I suspect means birds sold as free range can be pumped full of the same hormones and antibiotics as caged animals. Stocking rates for birds are astronomically high, while still being allowed to be called free range; currently it basically moves the same number of birds outside as are allowed in a high density cage barn: If you have 20,000 birds in cages and a door to a 1 acre enclosed space, they’re free range. The RSPCA sticker is the best one to look out for, because their criteria are based on animal husbandry rather than stocking rates. They will label barn raised eggs, so long as the birds are not debeaked, stocked below a level that leads to aggression problems and are in good condition. Funnily enough I’ve never seen an RSPCA sticker among the 12 or 13  labels on egg packets round here, and as such have a massive distrust of how the eggs are labelled and produced.

    Beef doesn’t seem nearly as bad although a lot of it seems to be finished on feedlots where the food is heavy in hormones and other fun stuff to make them put on weight as quickly as possible. The big problem is that the animals are moved twice, often huge distances. Before they’re moved they are kept off food and water for 12 hours so they dont’ shit and piss all over the truck, and stand around in it for hours, and some of the trips to the feedlots are pretty long. Then they are moved from feedlot to Abattoir, when they need to go through the same procedure which stresses the animals again. We don’t buy ANY meat from the supermarket ever, largely because of the industrial processes that lead up to the product getting on the shelf. We are lucky enough to live in Australia’s “bush capital” so we have good butchers and produce easily accessible, but eating at restaurants is a bit dicey, as again there’s no reliable way here of checking on the quality of the product or how it was raised.

  22. @DerHoggz

    @brett

    Don’t you rock fi’zi:k shoes? Poor baby ‘roos. (emoticon goes here)

    Fuck no Roo’s awesome. Its the most viable animal on this continent in terms of converting what grows here (two thirds of fuck all) to protein. The local government culls the roos regularly as well, (that’s a separate argument but it stops them starving to death over winter, they’re inside the city limits and can’t range as widely as they should)) so if they end up on feet that’s awesome. Good use for it I reckon.

  23. @brett Nice article. Do you eat fish and sea food, I can’t remember from talking to you about it at the Keepers Tour.

    I’m a confirmed meat eater although I do find that I tend to eat much less of it and be much more selective about it’s quality and sourcing when I’m really focussed on my fitness and weight.

    Have you read Team on the Run by John Deering? It talks a bit about riding a Grand Tour on veggie power and it’s an interesting read in the same vein as Wide Eyed and Legless.

    @piwakawaka I’m not convinced that the likes of us have any true purchasing power. As long as there are huge numbers of poorly educated stupid people who either don’t care or understand what they’re eating, voting with your currency amounts to pissing into the wind.

    @PeakInTwoYears I like the idea of my kids understanding where their food comes from and I should probably do more to educate them in that sense – no one else is likely to. They get the whole meat comes from animals that have been killed part (I’ve got a few friends who shoot and the kids are quite unperturbed when a pheasant or duck is shot, plucked, cooked and served up to them) but I’m not sure they get the lower end of the market other than being told that I won’t ever take them to KFC.

  24. @Chris

    Slap yourself, Marx brothers style… If he eats fish and seafood he’s not a vegetarian.

    You sound like a French waiter.

    “Je suis vegetarien” usually provokes a confused look followed by the suggestion (or assumption) that you  eat chicken, and when it is “non” to le poulet then they move along to fish.

    Funnily enough they don’t think of omelette as vegetarian, or any of the naturally vegetarian dishes that most cuisines have. Because ‘normal’ people eat that too.

    Even in the middle east where we have all that lovely mezze to choose from – tabouleh, felafal, houmos, halloumi, vine leaves etc etc etc they still look a bit puzzled if you start talking about veggetarian options.

  25. @ChrisO “Je suis vegetarian” “Ah, qui, would you like ze chicken?” is probably better than being offered a vegetarian sausage, most of which are about as offensive as alcohol free beer.

    I’ve met a few people who claim to be vegetarian but really just draw the line at red meat/poultry based on the ethics of meat production as opposed to the organic/free range nature of fish. Anyway, I was leading into asking Brett if he takes the time to enquire whether his beer is vegetarian.

  26. I think the underlying theme isn’t so much vegan as much as it is discipline and sacrifice in pursuit of living the V. Just got back from training camp in Wisconsin where we climbed 8000 meters over six days. It was pretty freaking inspiring to be with 10 other guys who rolled out each morning to push themselves and each other. In terms of lifestyle, its a unique common ground that we share in our commitment to our craft.

    That said, nutrition plays a huge role. Attending training camps tends to hit the reset button on my eating habits – especially after a long-ass winter followed by cold and wet spring riding. If low fat proteins, whole foods and minding the intake of high fructose corn syrup help take the weight off – so be it. I know how much better I’ll climb five pounds from now. For me its about bringing as much focus and discipline as I can manage [in spite of my many mid-age bad habits] to become a stronger cyclist. Whatever the pain or sacrifice…it’s worth it.

  27. @Buck Rogers

    @RedRanger That video is the fuckingly funniest thing I have seen in ages! Foock me. I am still dying over it. Too funny.

    That was hilarious!

  28. @Nate

    @DerHoggz Spot on. I like my meat but it’s quality before quantity. We had a local butcher open in the neighborhood recently and when meat is on the menu that is where it comes from.

    Very interesting write-up, Brett. I’m kinda in the same camp as @DerHoggz and @Nate, I think – I eat meat very rarely (about once every second week, at a guess), but when I do, I’ll pay good money for the best quality I can get – and it actually means something to me that it’s locally produced (and preferably from animals that have had at least a semblance of a life – yes, I’m that much of a softie, at least off the bike…) 

    One thing that has really started to freak me out about the meat-industry (and it IS an industry) is the use of antibiotics as preventive medicine (or so it is claimed) but also, more importantly, as a growth promotor. Have a strong feeling that one day in the near future, this will be the final straw that turns me off meat altogether

  29. @minion

    My father in law works for Foster Farms (which for non-Americans is where a metric to the nth shit ton of our chicken comes from).

    He oversees the “grow out ranches” where the chicks go from fluff balls to dinner in 43days. I went to work with him one day to check it out. Crazy amount of chickens on those ranches. And it’s able to be called “natural” because they’re not in cages, tho they are packed into those barns pretty tight.

    Then, as a bonus, I went to the processing plant where they went from alive to chicken nuggets in something like 8min. And the worst part was that absolutely nothing is wasted. What doesn’t get turned into food for us, gets mixed with and fed back to the chickens.

    I didn’t eat chicken for a couple months after that, and now only raise my own.

  30. @scaler911 as you know I worked in the meat industry for 5 years. Went from a live cow to steaks. my main issue with the animal cruelty take is no one ever cares about the people working the line. I’ve mentioned this to Brett before. I’m all for transforming the way the industry Operates. Read The Jungle, it hasn’t changed much.

  31. @RedRanger

    @scaler911 as you know I worked in the meat industry for 5 years. Went from a live cow to steaks. my main issue with the animal cruelty take is no one ever cares about the people working the line. I’ve mentioned this to Brett before. I’m all for transforming the way the industry Operates. Read The Jungle, it hasn’t changed much.

    Oh yeah, The Jungle, amazing book.  Had to read it in high school and I have not eaten a hotdog since.  Although the VMH meakes a mean Tofu-Pup! 

    I grew up on a small dairy farm in northern Vermont and the only meat we ever ate was what we butchered ourselves from our stock of less than 100 cows and the two pigs we raised each year and the deer we shot and the fish we caught.  We did not have much money so it worked well to be able to have it all from the farm and surrounding land as we could not really afford to buy meat at the store.  Very healthy stuff.  We would always sit around and say, “Who are we eating tonight?” and be like, “Oh this is Daisy, she was a good cow”.  Maybe that is why I am so warped?

    Now the meat my family eats is 95% from the local Farmers Market.  Way more expensive but oh so worth it.  The flavor is not even comparable to store bought meats, esp the chicken.

  32. veggie tales or whatever floats your boat is fine

    I am not prejudiced to kill a vegetable either, so i equally kill chicken, pork or beef and enjoy them all

    The crux of the arguement it appears to me to be that we all want to perform like the Ferrari’s we are, and what we feed ourselves undeniably does contribute directly to that.

    Listen veggies, you can eat as much processed crap as the rest of society, and that is a big problem.  Organic and local farming (like i do for me and mine) makes a difference, in health and wellness.  It hasn’t made me a damn bit faster on the bike and i don’t climb better, but I feel good, and know where my chicken and turkey come from, as they range in the back yard now.  Just cut brocholi, lettuce and the miss’s is picking strawberries right now.

    Its about falling for the marketing and shit out there that you can eat shit and feel and be well.  You can’t.  Processing foods, (listen veggies) mostly carbs are literally foreign bodies much of the time.  Corporate owned farms and their marketing of this crap and delivering modified foods to market are what are seriously growing our obese population.  theres so much out there to read on this, its mind boggling

    nonetheless, that is something that we can all kick to the curb

  33. The Jungle?  Warped?

    Y’all want to change your relationship to food (and almost everything else) read Cows by Matthew Stokoe.  Better yet, don’t as I do not want any of the Velomonati to associate me with that writing.

  34. Really enlightening the variety around here, not a day goes by without further education. Just as kit appears many feel justified by supporting locally grown butchery, I’d implore anyone consuming tofu or other soy products to research where they come from, if you’ve not done so already. GMO crops, such as glyphosphate resistant soy, can only be good for Monsanto, rather than the naturally evolved soy plant, and therefore what goes through us. It appears the mighty dollar can cause a shit ton of fun, no matter how socially responsible we’d like to be!

  35. “Erebus,” the first book by Greenpeace co-founder Robert Hunter, had a similar influence on me. A very dark, disturbing, experimental novel drawing on his experience working at a Winnipeg abbatoir. Long overlooked and out of print, unfortunately.

  36. Reminds me of an old joke:

    How can I tell if my friend is a vegetarian?

    Don’t worry, he’ll tell you.

  37. @il ciclista medio

    @Rob My thoughts as well pretty much.

    My wife is from a certain part of Asia that has the longest lifespans of anyone on the planet. This doesn’t come from snacking on dried hoofed meat or XXXL take aways.A lot of their food is locally sourced and they take great pride in stating that this vegetable is grown by a certain local farmer for example.
    Through this our families diet has changed significantly over the years to a more plant based one, with animal protein as a flavouring rather then the main course. All of us are the better for it and it certainly hasn’t affected my cycling life.

    Interestingly in her home country they they drink like fish as well from what I have seen; so the morale of the story..eat less land animals, more vegetables and seafood and drink way more booze to live longer

    That was the most fundamental cuisine experience for me when I was in Vietnam and two islands of Japan: “meat” (fish, pig, cow, et al) were an added bonus, the meat…was something stock like rice or rice noodles. My body is happy on stuff, I find.

  38. @Apex Nadir

    Reminds me of an old joke:

    How can I tell if my friend is a vegetarian?

    Don’t worry, he’ll tell you.

    That’s pretty strong, but I don’t know how I feel about your handle.

  39. Who took that photo of Dave Mckenzie? It isn’t attributed.

  40. @Query

    Who took that photo of Dave Mckenzie? It isn’t attributed.

    There ya go mate…

    A great look into the life of a big Pommy git vegetarian Pro here… 

    “The hotel we were staying at obviously had no idea of how to feed a bunch of vegetarians, judging by the food we were getting. Every meal had a serious amount of egg in it as a main ingredient, so they must have had a shed load of chickens working double overtime in the kitchen! The French team were getting rather red looking chicken every night, which brought us to the conclusion these chickens must have been keeling over from egg laying exhaustion.”

  41. @Jamie

    Cows by Matthew Stokoe.

    I’m not a religious man but Jesus Fucking Christ.

  42. @minion Ah, I see you’ve read Mr. Stokoe’s work.

  43. @scaler911 Yarp. In Aus there are 3 or 4 large industrial operations (very slick, plenty of money for lobbying, supply supermarkets, fast food, bakery chains etc) and a few thousand small producers who do it for local supply/true organic. Just like any gathering of rugged individualists, they struggle to organise themselves effectively, so labelling and legislation knd of suck. The downside is the conditions the animals are kept in. Come out of the egg male? Powdered chicken. THe conditions the animals have to be kept in to be prosecuted is also, fucking abysmal, hence no eggs for me and very little chicken.

  44. I’m a macro biotic, vegan, vegetarian, carnivore who loves bacon. Cook up some good food and I’ll eat it. Unless it’s asparagus; then you can have my share.

    As to the rest of you, enjoy your meals in any way, diet or fashion you like. And if you don’t drink beer, it leaves more for the rest of us.

  45. Surprising to see so many V-getarians here. And so many of those that aren’t, consume their meat carefully and selectively. It appears that the population actually committed to sports is usually more careful about what they eat, and not only in terms of calories and nutritional value.

    I’ve been a vegetarian since I was 5 years old, my mother joined later. Coached by a vegan ultra-runner and a vegan elite cyclist and son to the vegetarian national Ironman champion, I’m quite confident that this decision doesn’t hurt my performance one bit.

  46. @Chris

    @brett Nice article. Do you eat fish and sea food, I can’t remember from talking to you about it at the Keepers Tour.

    Very rarely, and only if there is no option (like if you go to someone’s house for dinner and they think that being vege means you eat fish). Or if you entrust someone like @rigid to order a pizza and he thinks that “vegetarian” means “meat lovers”…

  47. @Jamie

    @minion Ah, I see you’ve read Mr. Stokoe’s work.

    That was probably the world’s quickest google search. Does he get called Pynchon-esue at all? (When he’s not being called fucking disgusting)

  48. Stokoe sounds way more disgusting than Pynchon.

    Disgusting English Candy Drill, anyone?

  49. For an interesting alternative, you might want to read “The Paleo Diet for Athletes” by Loren Cordain and Joel Friel. I’ve been doing it for 3 or 4 months. I’ve never felt better. We eat only free range meat.

  50. interesting read, the article as well as people’s opinions on various diets.  been a vegetarian for several years and honestly, it’s just not something i even consider any more.  people ask me why occasionally and it makes no sense to tell them the original reasons, because the truth is it’s just who i am now and that’s not gonna change.  preaching to people about why they should or shouldn’t be vegetarian is silly and a waste of time.  the more important matter is to try and eat healthy, regardless of diet.  from the looks of it, most of us here agree on that; which is, frankly, what i’d expect.

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