• As many of you know, I write a monthly column for Cyclist Magazine where I answer Dear Abby-esque questions, and the most recent query pertained to whether I consider the Tour the best race of the year, or whether […]

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  • @Art G OOOOH. That’s a good one. Merckx, this is why we should sober up every now and again. Another one we missed was Sagan in the 2015 Worlds at Richmond. What a race.

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @Neil Owens Now that’s the interesting part. Now I have to read all this bullshit you guys wrote! I’m going to call the comp now, though, and will announce the winner later this week after the other authors get a chance to weigh in.

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @Buck Rogers I had lunch with Steve (Hampsten) today and we both agree you must be mainlining amphetamine. No normal person has as much energy as you!

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @sthilzy He always did look spectacular on a TT bike. And look at Andy, he’s like a parachute.

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @RobSandy Indeed. Or his ride over the cobbles during the 1983(?) Tour. One of the stages was through the pavé and he’d never ridden them before. He killed it but destroyed his hands because he didn’t know how to ride loose on the stones. Won the Tour at 21 or whatever idiotically young age he was at the time.

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @Kunanyi If memory serves, it was on the Galibier, Schleck attacked and went clear, Evans had a mechanical much later on the lower slopes of the Galibier (technically the Lautaret) but started to bridge up and closed the gap massively. Contador got dropped early…is that the day you’re talking about?

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  • frank commented on the post, Weekend Competition: The Hardmen 2 weeks ago · 

    @Buck Rogers I would never have the time to do so in the timeframe allotted…

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  • @KogaLover Not sure who will do it, but we only heard at the end of last week; due out in the Spring. I have asked as a condition of the agreement that I review the translation prior to going to press. If you guys know of a professional translator who might be up for the job, let me know. I’m mostly concerned about capturing the Velominati…

    [Read more]

  • @Buck Rogers Oh man, that was such an epic day! Great calls all around. LeMonster’s 1989 ITT to win the Tour isn’t bad either…

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  • @HigherGround Actually, the story as I’ve heard it was that they tried to lance it and his roommate heard painful shrieks coming from the bathroom where the procedure was being performed. He abandoned the next day, while in the lead.

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  • @Buck Rogers It’s a lot harder than it seems, but of course now I realize LeMond on Luz Ardiden in 1990 would have been the moment to choose. Maybe we can add it for the US release. The Dutch release is coming out in Spring and we’re adding Dumpoulin.

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  • @Fausto Adam is in the book, you dingdong.

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  • frank commented on the post, The Color White 2 weeks, 3 days ago · 

    @Phillip Mercer That. Is. Awesome.

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  • @Buck Rogers That’s absolutely why, for the conpetition, we’re asking you to come up with a specific example

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  • As I said last week when we announced the new book, The Hardmen, we had a much harder time of it writing this one than we did with The Rules. There are a variety of reasons why this is true, not least the fact […]

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    • Right, I can see where it could be really hard to limit it but I was baffled not to find Le Professeur, LeMan, Coppi and Gimondi in the pages (but Virenque, Hansen and McEwen made it???). But in life it is so much easier to criticize and destroy than build and do (but Hansen???)

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    • Just started reading it today as it arrived in yesterday’s mail. Gimme a second to digest the contents….

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    • @Buck Rogers That’s absolutely why, for the conpetition, we’re asking you to come up with a specific example

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    • @Charles Barilleaux Now this, I gotta hear.

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    • @frank Ahh, got it. For starters there’s one of the most famous Hardmen story ever with Fiorenzo Magni riding the Giro with a broken collarbone (and he did not have his unborn twin to help him, either!)

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    • Bartoli was a Hardman many times but the specific intense that most stands out was when he was riding with hidden documents during the war to save Jewish lives. That is about as Hardcore as one can get since he would most likely have been literally shot if he were caught.

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    • So yeah, I see the difficulties with coming up with specific rides for Leman and Le Professeur off the top of my head and I do not know my history well enough with Coppi and Gimondi. That’s a good point. Maybe you could have a supplemental chapter dealing with riders who just exuded Hardness their whole careers even though one cannot pinpoint a specific instance?

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    • I was so going to jump on Beryl Burton as a usually-unsung heroine, but lo and behold she’s in there! Chapeau, Keepers. I think I’d have to nominate Tom Simpson for the 1965 World Championships with support crew; he and his teammates apparently had to steal food and drinks off other teams. What’s more, five weeks earlier, he broke his hand on stage 9 of the Tour, but he only stopped racing on stage 19 because the Tour doctor basically kicked him off the race and sent him to hospital for surgery and treatment for various related infections. Obviously, it was stupid to reach that point, but the fact he kept riding, and to win Worlds such a short time later!

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    • Honourable mention for the late, great Mike Hall. His style of cycling doesn’t lend itself to adherence to the Rules (cf. saddle bags, aero bars), but he was indisputably one of the hardest guys on a bike out there, and his untimely death earlier this year when he was hit by a car during the Indian-Pacific Wheel Race was another reminder of how fragile we all are out there on the road. There’s a “ghost” pin on the TransAm tracker for his record time, and he’s in the lead. What a guy.

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    • @Charles Barilleaux Good call. If I remember correctly, he was sick with a fever during the 1986 Tour de France and advised by doctors to abandon, but finished as 7-Eleven’s top place in Paris.

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    • @Buck Rogers “Fuckin spot on, Bevin!” We have a winner.

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    • I don’t have a copy of the book yet, much to my chagrin, so please forgive me if this example is already used in either of the ones for Sean Kelly. I recall reading that he had a saddle sore that blew up to the size of a golf ball while he was leading the Vuelta a España. Legend has it that he had the team doctor remove it at the hotel, before the start of a time trial. If true, that example should be in there! And then there were also the stories of how long he would abstain from sex before major races, prompting Paul Sherwen to speculate that Sean’s wife was still a virgin. (Insert pun about book title here.)

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    • Mike Cotty. First he rode Raid Pyrenean. 685km 11k metres of ascent right across the pyrenees. But fuck that. Easy shit so Cotty rides Les Alpes, from Evian Les Bains to Nice, a distance of 666 kilometres with 17 mountain passes – including the Col de la Colombière, Madeleine, Glandon, Croix de Fer, Télégraphe, Galibier, Izoard, Vars, Bonette and Madone – with over 16,000 metres of elevation and five cols over 2,000 metres. Comparable to four mountain stages of the Tour de France or close to scaling Mount Everest (twicel Then this.. The road to Mont Blanc. That’s when shit got real.. 1,000km non-stop crossing of the Dolomites, Eastern Alps and Swiss Alps with 21 climbs and over 23,000 metres of elevation. Read his blog. Did this whilst setting off in driving rain and suffered hallucinations whilst riding. Fucking hard-core.

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    • @Neil Owens a bit of creative smarts to think of Cotty, here. these rides are indeed quite incredible. Cotty’s a stud, world tour or no world tour. his Col Collective YouTube channel is also superb.

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    • Tom Simpson. Literally rode himself to death. Doesn’t get harder than that.

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    • Add this lady to the “Hardwomen’ Section Annemiek van Vleuten Do I need to elaborate ?

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    • Raymond Poulidor; 1961 MSR; 1964 TDF

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    • Johnny Hoogerland was in the lead group of stage 9 of the 2011 TDF when he was hit by a psycho TV car driver and launched into a barbed wire fence where he hung suspended by the razor sharp points until he could be helped free, riding kit and skin both in tatters. He finished the stage and was promptly laced up with 33 stitches but soldiered on to Paris, even continuing to fight for the polka dot jersey. Along with Fiorenzo Magni’s legendary performance in 1956 I can think of few more deserving riders/performances of the “Hardman” moniker. ATMO.

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    • Luis Ocana – about the only rider who did not accept that they were racing for second against The Prophet. His ride on the Orcieres-Merlette stage in the 1971 TdF and this in 1969…..though admittedly he probably didn’t know much about the latter.

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    • @Teocalli Fucking Spot on! Super! I think that there must be about 100 amazing Hardmen rides (or more) from pre-1980 that we just do not know b/c we do not know our history well enough. Fucking riding 400 k stages with 2 gears on 12 kilo bikes. These guys in the early days were fucking Legend! We need Oli to weigh in with about 20 off the top of his head!

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    • @Buck Rogers We could have hit on a recipe here for a series by doing a decade per issue. @Fraughnk and I want royalties for that idea if you do!

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    • Loved reading the book but had to beat the cover with my mini pump after getting to the last page and finding no chapter on Firenze Magni…stage 13 Giro 56…surely still the best way to articulate V to the uninitiated.

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    • @Teocalli Ha! Not me, Mate! I do not claim to have anywhere near the ability or knowledge to pull that idea off–although it is a fucking great idea! So Frahnk, you can do another book that has … say … 12 chapters starting with the 1890’s and moving up to present day and describe the Hardest riders/rides done per decade per chapter. Also can do another book that is has each chapter devoted to a pure Hardman without specific rides so that we can honour LeMan, Le Professuer, Tommeke, etc. Damn–we’re just all so helpful around here, aren’t we???

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    • @Buck Rogers +10,000. Magni ftw. Was his story in The Rules tho?

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    • Wining the 1989 TdF after being mistaken for a turkey by his trigger happy brother in law doesn’t qualify LeMond? With buckshot residue still present in his body?

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    • @Buck Rogers Guess you mean Gino BartAli, not Bartoli (Michele)…

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    • @Buck Rogers @Buck Rogers you mean BartAli, not Michele Bartoli, I guess?

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    • Johnny Hoogerland TdF 2011, stage 9

      • Run over by TV car
      • flung in to a barbed wire,
      • brushes off the dust
      • contiues to claim the polka dot jersey
      • Hardman
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    • John Howard! Set land speed record of 152.2 miles per hour (245 km/h) while motor-pacing in 1985 (record stood for 10 years) And, and, and: Gold medal in the 1971 Pan American Games road race in Cali, Colombia 4-time U.S. National Road Cycling champion (1968, 1972, 1973 and 1975) Won the first two editions of the Red Zinger Bicycle Classic in 1975 and 1976 1982, one of four competitors in the inaugural Race Across America RAAM, eventually finishing second Won the fourth Hawaii Ironman (which you Will excuse against Rule #42)

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    • @Cary Yep, the Hardmen book doesn’t just include professional riders. Cotty deserves a mention. The video of his Mont Blanc ride is incredible. Excruciating watching him struggle up the stelvio. Any one who experiences hallucinations whilst partaking in a bike ride deserves a mention. One tough guy.

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    • Jonny Hoogerland, TdF 2011, stage 9 “run over” by a car flung into the field, tangled up in barbwire on the way. Brushes of the dust and continue to the finish line to receive the polka dot jersey

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    • @Fausto Adam is in the book, you dingdong.

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    • @Nero Dammit!!! I ALWAYS do that! Last time Oli called me out!!! Some day I’ll learn (or more likely not!!!). Thanks!

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    • @Buck Rogers It’s a lot harder than it seems, but of course now I realize LeMond on Luz Ardiden in 1990 would have been the moment to choose. Maybe we can add it for the US release. The Dutch release is coming out in Spring and we’re adding Dumpoulin.

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    • @Cary I was going to post that one too. Somewhere in the Velominati archives is a Guest Article I did on it. I’ll throw another out there: Major Taylor. First black national and world cycling champion. Track rider extraordinaire in the late 19th, early 20th centuries. The racism and discrimination he endured throughout his career was awful yet he handled it with dignity and class. No question his career and life qualifies him as a hardman.

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    • Gert Jan Theunise. It isn’t so much about his results, which are respectable, as much as it is about his presence. His jaw line could cut metal and I think most of us would give up a race before it started if we got caught in his stare. He oozes hardness.

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    • @Duane Gran And that mullet, eh?

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    • @frank And speaking of Le Blaireau, here is your clip that you recommend in the book.

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    • @HigherGround Actually, the story as I’ve heard it was that they tried to lance it and his roommate heard painful shrieks coming from the bathroom where the procedure was being performed. He abandoned the next day, while in the lead.

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    • Gianni Bugno. Back to back Worlds, holding the pink Jersey from start to finish in 1990, Milan San Remo, De Ronde, and bashing a spectator across the nose with his front wheel for taking him down in the Alps. Plus bonus points for this flawless execution.

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    • @frank I also read that they didn’t want to go to a hospital and alert other teams/media Kelly was suffering, so it was done without anesthetic in a hotel bathroom. Yikes..

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    • @frank I haven’t been on here for about two years and I still get insulted by @Frank. The OP re: Adam Hansen is a different Fausto though – didn’t think the system allowed identical handles?

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    • @frank There’s also a Dutch version coming out and you’re only telling us now, and even only as a lose comment in a byline? Please make sure you use a different translator than the one who did De Regels. He does not know about cycling. Some translations made my toes curl so I could not clip in anymore. What Dutch title is being proposed? Harde mannen? or Bikkels? @ErikdR @RvanDijk Btw: any update on my gear order from last last year?

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    • @Fausto Karma for not being here for 2 years.

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    • @sthilzy READ THE BOOK OR AT LEAST THE CONTENTS WHICH FRANK HAS INCLUDED AT THE TOP OF THIS PAGE

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    • BTW, how good is the photo on the inside back cover of the Prophet and the Disciple gunning it? I had to stare at it for a long, long time. Then show it to my wife. Then stare at it some more.

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    • @RobSandy Opps! I post before I read! Bit like reading A Winning mag – look at the pics 110+ times, then read an paragraph to know what the pics were about.

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    • @sthilzy Hah. No one reads the articles anyway. The chapter on Hansen is well worth a read, btw. I hadn’t realised what a cool fucker he is.

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    • @sthilzy ,,, didn’t realize there was another pic of the chapters. Forehead slap fixed it!

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    • @RobSandy Cool fucker – he can make you a shoe! https://hanseeno.myshopify.com/collections/shoes

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    • @KogaLover Entirely possible.

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    • I am late to this. But how could LeMan not be considered? To wit … the Prologue to Richard Moore’s “Slaying the Badger.”

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    • I would argue that LeMond riding with diarrhea is more #9 than any #9 ride. Compare that to Dumoulin having to get off his bike in this year’s Giro.

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    • @chuckp By all accounts it was for those around him……………..

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    • @sthilzy Not to diminish Hansen’s achievement in any way, but it has only been possible in the modern era. Until fairly recently, the Vuelta was held in April, then the Giro in May and the Tour in July – three grand tours on four months. No rider could do 17 consecutive GTs with that schedule. Chapeau to Hansen!

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    • ^ 150 miles. What are those? Oh man, The Accidental COTHO? What a superb chapter title! That is aVVwesome. Also, cannot imagine racing 60 km with a soiled chamois. That sounds like torture!

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    • Oh, and did anyone else notice Dumoulin’s Maglia Rosa was not a full zip jersey? Goddamn, he was probably angrier than ever to be in the lead on that day!

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    • @chuckp One of my favorite cycling Hardman stories of all time. I told it to my five kids with a deep reverence a few years ago and they all just looked at me like I was fucking insane (they might be right). LeMan deserves a whole fucking Hardman book just devoted to him.

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    • @Blackjohn Schotte gets in on the basis of that photo alone. He looks like he’s just stepped out of Bergman’s The Seventh Seal.

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    • @wiscot Ha! Touche’!

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    • @wiscot Wonder if he plays chess well?

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    • @Buck Rogers I think even Gary Kasparov would wilt under the intensity of that stare.

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    • @Buck Rogers Yup, that’s quite the bedtime story: Greg and the (bad) Giant Peach.

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    • @Buck Rogers Oh man, that was such an epic day! Great calls all around. LeMonster’s 1989 ITT to win the Tour isn’t bad either…

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    • @KogaLover Not sure who will do it, but we only heard at the end of last week; due out in the Spring. I have asked as a condition of the agreement that I review the translation prior to going to press. If you guys know of a professional translator who might be up for the job, let me know. I’m mostly concerned about capturing the Velominati spirit in the sense that we deliberately misuse words and make others up to suit our fancy. Re order, hoping to get organized and sort that out soon – I know one hurdle is easier to be cleared than the other, but will do so as soon as feasible…

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    • @frank Yeah, might want to find an editor who’s not averse to some “naughty” words . . .

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    • @frank As f0r the LVC kit order–please remember that my address has been updated to Germany since last year. I gave you the new address last summer when I moved but I can resend it to you if you need it. Thanks.

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    • Cadel Evans 2011 Tour de France. Pretty sure it was Stage 19. He’s isolated, has a bike problem at the bottom of the climb (Tourmalet?). Contador attacks at the same time. He drags himself up and bombs the descent, limits his losses up the other side while pulling others with him and then wins the race with the time trial the next day.

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    • @frank I’d suggest that if one of Fignon’s rides was put forwards then his ITT to LOSE that tour was also epic. He was suffering a saddle tour, had been told previously by the UCI that the aerobars he’d trialed wouldn’t be allowed, only to see LeMonde turn up to the Tour with a full aero set up…and he gave it EVERYTHING. The photos of him after the finish tell the tale eloquently.

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    • @Kunanyi Cadel got airborne on that TT!

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    • @sthilzy Go to 8:50

      Recall Evans rode the whole course on the day, the Schleck’s drove out in the car and rode back to the start! Spoke to Cadel about that ITT day and he said, “It was a relaxing ride”!

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    • Fignon again. 1988 Milan-San Remo: won by Fignon in a 2-man sprint with Maurizio Fondriest. Instead of being happy winning a Monument he was annoyed that the Italian had stayed with him on the Poggio and prevented him the glory of winning alone and decided to come back and do it. 1989 Milan San Remo: Fignon drops everyone and crosses the line alone as he planned. I think that is badass.

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @Buck Rogers I would never have the time to do so in the timeframe allotted…

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    • @Buck Rogers

      They might be insane? Really? Like that was ever in doubt.

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @Kunanyi If memory serves, it was on the Galibier, Schleck attacked and went clear, Evans had a mechanical much later on the lower slopes of the Galibier (technically the Lautaret) but started to bridge up and closed the gap massively. Contador got dropped early…is that the day you’re talking about?

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @RobSandy Indeed. Or his ride over the cobbles during the 1983(?) Tour. One of the stages was through the pavé and he’d never ridden them before. He killed it but destroyed his hands because he didn’t know how to ride loose on the stones. Won the Tour at 21 or whatever idiotically young age he was at the time.

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @sthilzy He always did look spectacular on a TT bike. And look at Andy, he’s like a parachute.

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    • @frank I think that would be Stage 3 of the 1983 Tour: Valenciennes to Roubaix. The stage was won by Rudy Matthijs. Fignon won that Tour at his first attempt in only his second year as a pro. He was 22 years old. Hinault was out injured so Fignon and Marc Madiot were co-leaders of the Renault team. Stage wins were the goal, but after Pascal Simon retired with a broken shoulder, Fignon inherited the Maillot Jaune and won the race. In case there was any doubt that he was a deserving winner, in 1984 Fignon won five stages and the race overall by 10:32 from Hinault and 11:46 from LeMond. Robert Millar was 4th at 14:42 and the top 10 was rounded out by Phil Anderson at a whopping 29:16 down.

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    • Who won @frank

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @Buck Rogers I had lunch with Steve (Hampsten) today and we both agree you must be mainlining amphetamine. No normal person has as much energy as you!

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    • frank replied 2 weeks ago

      @Neil Owens Now that’s the interesting part. Now I have to read all this bullshit you guys wrote! I’m going to call the comp now, though, and will announce the winner later this week after the other authors get a chance to weigh in.

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    • @KogaLover As a stickler for the facts and figures, allow me to confirm that Adam Hansen’s current tally of Grand Tours in a row stands at: all of ’em… …and counting.

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    • Ha! You should have seen me when I was 19! Fuck, looking back I do not know how anyone could stand to be around me. Hell, most people that know me now at 45 try to sneak away when they see me coming!!! i can relate to this.

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    • @frank Will be a tough decision some brilliant entries here…should provide a good few ideas for volume 2!

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    • I’m going to cast a vote for Tommy Godwin. 75000 miles, 200 plus per day, in 1939. Knowing the British climate I imagine he rode in just about every kind of weather, with the exception of extreme heat.

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    • Pressed submit a bit early there. Anyway, Tommy Godwin, 200 miles a day for a whole year is an unthinkable target for most of us I reckon. The physical and logistical demands alone are mind boggling even by modern standards, let alone on a heavier pre-war bike, with poorer roads etc.

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    • @Steve Trice Back end of the year I believe he also had to ride with no lights in the blackout.

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    • If this is just an attempt to get enough suggestions so you can print a second volume then that’s great . . . If you want Hardmen then look no further than Eileen Sheridan … surprised she didn’t make the cut …Here are some figures … In 1954 she broke the 12 hour record where she covered 250 and a half miles, and the 24-hour record in 446 and a half miles. She broke 21 of the women’s distance records by large margins. Five have yet to be beaten, including the London-Edinburgh record of 20h 11m 35s, set in 1954. Her 1,000-mile record of 3 days and 1 hour stood for 48 years, until it was broken in 2002 by Lynne Taylor. and Land’s End to John O’Groates in 2 days, 11 hours and 7 minutes.

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    • @frank another translator could be Wilfried de Jong. He’s written books himself on cycling and does columns in national newspaper. Witty but maybe expensive.

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    • Lemond is totally Skywalker. he was probably so strong as a junior, and even as a neopro, he didn’t have to learn reality, as most do before they become Tour contenders. he certainly aquitted himself well after ’86, though. Watching Fignon, Lemond, Hinault, and Kelly battle through the ’80s was awesome.

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    • @Cary Does that make Hinault Darth Vader?

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    • @RobSandy Does that make Beryl Burton Padmé?

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    • wiscot replied 1 week ago

      @sthilzy I’m not sure, but I think Andy Schleck is Jar Jar Binks.

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    • @RobSandy Surely on the Light side, more like Yoda?

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    • Cary replied 1 week ago

      @Teocalli to charcterize Vader as purely evil does him, and the Sith order, a disservice. Hinault totally validated Lemond’s legitimacy in 1986. the kid needed some scars. Vader, he is!

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    • Cary replied 1 week ago

      Guimard is Yoda, obviously.

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    • Cary replied 1 week ago

      hold up.. maybe not. upon further consideration, Guimard is more likely Obi Wan Kenobi. Koechli is Yoda.

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    • @frank @all Speaking of LeMan. Down under manufacturing not dead after the car companies leave it seems. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-21/greg-lemond-in-new-carbon-fibre-venture-with-deakin-university/8637092

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    • Alf Engers — there is no other. For the uninitiated… http://www.purelyaloveofthebike.co.uk/engers_4924.htm http://www.purelyaloveofthebike.co.uk/engers.htm Amongst King Alf’s many achievements, 25mile TT in 1978 at 49:24. And the boy had some attitude to match his prowess in the big-fuck-off-ring.

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    • @a_p Thanks for posting! What a read! I began my TT career in the very early 80s but Engers was a legend. The pic of him post-race at his van says it all. In the 80s there was a very talented roadie called Darryl Webster who had massive talent an ego to match. All sports need such characters.

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    • @wiscot These fellows kept it real. We can only be inspired to aspire… Dartmoor Classic next weekend!

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    • @frank Let’s not forget Chambery 1989. I watched it on live television and I will never forget the relentless attacks and counter-attacks. Glorious weather and a technical run-in leading to that sprint consisting of the era’s finest riders. And that post race interview “All day long I felt just awful, then my wheel broke but I suddenly felt good and thought I better not stop to change it now!”- LeMan

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    • @Art G OOOOH. That’s a good one. Merckx, this is why we should sober up every now and again. Another one we missed was Sagan in the 2015 Worlds at Richmond. What a race.

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  • By the way, I forgot about this little gem we added to The Rules in the book – now added to this little album. Take that.

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  • frank commented on the post, The Color White 2 weeks, 4 days ago · 

    The 90’s style bidon cages are mint, too. The finishing tape on the bar wrap, however, blows balls.

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