Respect is a cornerstone of La Vie Velominatus.

The Past and the Future

by / / 112 posts

I’m struggling with how to open this conversation without sounding like what I’m assuming my grandparents did when I was growing up. Maybe it’s because I’m just now clawing my way into some of the wisdom they had, or maybe I’m just less of an idiot than I was when they were moving their lips and I wasn’t listening. (Spoiler alert: everyone is less of an idiot then I was when I was a kid. No need to wait for the memoir.)

Kids these days have no respect.

There. I said it. Let me add some stage directions to this, for clarity.

Stage left, everyone under the age of 25: [heads down, tapping at their phones] Text me. I don’t do “speaking”. [All look up, sigh in chorus, and look back at their phones. Some of the cast members roll their eyes.]

Center stage, anyone between 25 and 37: Yeah, but they’ll learn. Give them a chance to express their ideas on this world and we’ll be happy for their challenging perspective. I embrace their view as it will help us grow both as individuals and a society. Also, Mom and Dad, please text me.

Stage right, everyone else: Bugger off, you disrespectful cretins.

The past informs the future; wisdom is learned through experience and experience is earned through the errors of our actions. That sounds a lot like a rationalization for screwing up all the time and maybe that’s true, but that doesn’t mean the premise is flawed; we must look behind us to understand where we are going. By respecting our past, we may build a better future.

In a world where the young have no respect for the wisdom of age and the old have no appreciation for the genius of youth, La Vie Velominatus cuts through the din and grounds us. Cycling is deeply rooted in the past while fiercely embracing the future. The Cyclist lives happily on both sides of the coin; cherishing our steel frames and hand-made tubular tires while embracing 10 and 11 speed drive-trains and featherweight carbon frames and deep-section wheels.

Keepers Tour 2012 was the first time I’d been to the cobbles of Northern Europe. When we arrived at the mouth of the Arenberg Forest, we were compelled to climb off and pay our respects to this, the most sacred of roads in our sport. By modern measure, this is the worst road imaginable: mossy cobbles roughly strewn across a narrow lane; uneven and sometimes as far as two or three centimeters apart. This is a road so rough it is difficult to walk down. To a Cyclist, it represents the most beautiful road on Earth. This is a road that lets us touch history.

A puzzle is meant to be solved; a mystery is not. The past is a puzzle and the future a mystery. Beauty is found in the space where the past and future live as one. Cycling is beauty.

Vive la Vie Velominatus.

// Keepers Tour // La Vie Velominatus // Look Pro // Nostalgia // Rantings from the V-Bunker

  1. @PeakInTwoYears

    Good point – and perhaps I should have stressed that my second ‘Ugh’ was aimed more at the phenomenon of (crash) courses in mindfulness, than at the concept of mindfulness as such. I see enormous value in that concept, but I have this nagging feeling that it is in the process of being usurped, for lack of a better word – and (often) heralded as yet another ‘quick fix’.

    I’ll gladly confess, at the risk of being labelled an incurable hippie (too late, I know; who am I kidding?), that I try to integrate a degree of ‘mindfulness’ into my everyday life and work.

    The funny thing is: Quite often, it’s as if my bike rides, all by themselves, turn into long sessions of an almost meditative state of ‘just being’ – a state that I very much associate with mindfulness.

  2. @wilburrox

    @wiscot

    Did they take their caps off at least? (If they were wearing them) That’s another thing that irks me – going into an eatery and seeing boys/men wearing goddamn caps. And while I’m ranting, it also irks me to see guys going on dates where the lady has made some effort to look attractive (wash hair, apply make-up, wear something clean and nice) while the guy rolls in wearing whatever didn’t smell too bad in the laundry basket. And a fucking baseball cap.

    I wore a ball cap about EVERY day in undergrad. In grad school I had a prof look at me and say, “take your hat off indoors”. I thought, cool. It is probably a top five lesson I learned in grad school and carry with me. I remember it like it was yesterday. Strange the things we learn in the damnedest of places or times that stick with us.

    I accidentally called a senior lecturer a cunt directly to his face when I was in my first year of university.

    You win.

  3. @RobSandy

    @wilburrox

    @wiscot

    Did they take their caps off at least? (If they were wearing them) That’s another thing that irks me – going into an eatery and seeing boys/men wearing goddamn caps. And while I’m ranting, it also irks me to see guys going on dates where the lady has made some effort to look attractive (wash hair, apply make-up, wear something clean and nice) while the guy rolls in wearing whatever didn’t smell too bad in the laundry basket. And a fucking baseball cap.

    I wore a ball cap about EVERY day in undergrad. In grad school I had a prof look at me and say, “take your hat off indoors”. I thought, cool. It is probably a top five lesson I learned in grad school and carry with me. I remember it like it was yesterday. Strange the things we learn in the damnedest of places or times that stick with us.

    I accidentally called a senior lecturer a cunt directly to his face when I was in my first year of university.

    You win.

    FFS, I get to Level 1 with that comment?!

  4. @Teocalli

    @wilburrox

    You know what though? We’ll still get a kick outa riding our old steel frames but something tells me that there’s not gonna be a lotta sentimental yeehah jumping on a 30 yr old carbon Tarmac. That line about style and function having it at each other is pretty good. Early 60’s Strat comes to mind. Cheers all…

    I’ll raise a glass to that.

    Seconded, cheers. Some things don’t need improvement, and get better with age when loved. Other things are designed for the dumpster.

  5. @ErikdR

    @PeakInTwoYears

    Good point – and perhaps I should have stressed that my second ‘Ugh’ was aimed more at the phenomenon of (crash) courses in mindfulness, than at the concept of mindfulness as such. I see enormous value in that concept, but I have this nagging feeling that it is in the process of being usurped, for lack of a better word – and (often) heralded as yet another ‘quick fix’.

    Concur. I suppose a little bit is better than naught, though. Single-serving mindfulness.

    I’ll gladly confess, at the risk of being labelled an incurable hippie (too late, I know; who am I kidding?), that I try to integrate a degree of ‘mindfulness’ into my everyday life and work.

    The funny thing is: Quite often, it’s as if my bike rides, all by themselves, turn into long sessions of an almost meditative state of ‘just being’ – a state that I very much associate with mindfulness.

    This ++. It’s one of the biggest reasons why I ride, and why I so often ride solo. Just being, no agenda, just observing, critical faculties shut down. Then again, I too am an unrepentant longhaired hippie. I have a socialist agenda and some Birkenstocks in the closet, too.

  6. @Ccos

    @frank

    @ChrissyOne

    And when there was no crawdad, we ate sand.

    You’re from Mississippi?

    Nope, their school system may suck, but someone from Mississippi knows one eats a crawfish not a crawdad (though they be the same thing).

    “I’ll be taking these Huggies and whatever cash you got in the box…”

    Ooohhh . . . is that a nice little Raising Arizona reference you’ve slipped in there?

  7. The juxtaposition of waxing nostalgic here vs. the hipster bashing in the previous thread is amusing to me – especially all the Moleskine love. I’m a center-stager here (28) and I think much of my generation (the core segment of aforementioned hipsters) wrestles with essentially growing up half-digital, as opposed to (damn) kids these days who are digital native and the (old) people who are older than us who have adopted and adapted to digital living.

    A big part of ‘hipsterism’ is nostalgia/minimalism: farm-to-table, vinyl, Moleskines. When I don’t have a (well-kept) seasonal beard, I shave using a brush and razor (4-blades. No safety razor for me) because it simply does a better job. Same thing with quality of sound from vinyl. But it’s also this kind of shit that people hate hipsters for. With a beard, I well fit in to that Lumbersexual category. I own a lot of plaid (I’ve always loved it), wear skinny jeans (but with my guns, all jeans are skinny…yeah…) and even have some nice boots that I wear often. I also love the shit out of my iPhone. It makes my life easier. And I haven’t written in cursive in years.

    As for the younger generation. A lot of that is training/upbringing. I was taught to take my hat off when coming inside (any building. Restaurant, house, mall, whatever). When I have kids, they’ll be taught the same thing. Pay attention to the people your with, not those elsewhere. It’s just fucking manners and it can still be taught.

  8. @PeakInTwoYears

    @ErikdR

    I’m baffled by how, on the one hand, the ability to multitask (Ugh…) is considered a very important quality to possess – while on the other hand, fortunes are being spent on courses in ‘Mindfulness’!? (More Ugh…) Concentrate on what you are doing right here, right now. Focus on doing as good a job of it as you can. The rest will follow.

    I’m in complete sympathy, but I want to defend the practice of “mindfulness.” There are old and established practices of mindfulness that are, in my experience at least, very beneficial. But they require regular (near-daily) practice instead of buying a seat in a course.

    I spent five days in a Buddhist monastary in Thailand at one time, and let me say I’ve never felt more mindful. They practiced walking meditation so every step you took, you stopped and thought about that step for a little bit, so to speak. It was an amazing experience.

  9. @frank

    @PeakInTwoYears

    @ErikdR

    Charcoal and goose quills, ya youngsters! * shuffles back to stone slab and chisel*

    I have cut my own quill pens. Quill pens suck. Certain types of objects found the apogee of their design in the early 20th century. Pens and shaving equipment fall into this category.

    I was given a safety razor (with beautiful stand, soap cup if that’s what its called, and brush) for Christmas. I find it very similar to gluing tubulars; its harder and takes more time, but it forces you to spend a little bit of time focusing on the simple task at hand. In the case of tubs, its gluing it on nice and straight; in the case of shaving it’s getting yourself ready to look your best.

    I have to say, after the fear of slitting my own throat subsided, I am a massive fan.

    Its fun to need a tub of glue to set a tire, and its fun to need a sharps container to shave.

    I will not, however, use the safety razor on The Guns. If I miss a patch on my face, that’s just my coworkers who have to suffer. If I miss a patch on my legs, I’m bound to notice just as my head frops as The V is escaping my body.

    After you get used to the safety razor (they really are just as safe as the cheap ones) sit down and do the math. I was amazed at how much cheaper they turn out to be compared to the HYPER TURBO MACH EIGHTEEN SUPER FAST ULTRA whatever

  10. @SamFromTex

    After you get used to the safety razor (they really are just as safe as the cheap ones) sit down and do the math. I was amazed at how much cheaper they turn out to be compared to the HYPER TURBO MACH EIGHTEEN SUPER FAST ULTRA whatever

    Then you get to spend that money on kit and tires and single malt. And why? Because you’re shaving like a mindful human being not some monkey-minded flunky, that’s why. It’s a total win.

  11. @SamV

    The juxtaposition of waxing nostalgic here vs. the hipster bashing in the previous thread is amusing to me – especially all the Moleskine love. I’m a center-stager here (28) and I think much of my generation (the core segment of aforementioned hipsters) wrestles with essentially growing up half-digital, as opposed to (damn) kids these days who are digital native and the (old) people who are older than us who have adopted and adapted to digital living.

    A big part of ‘hipsterism’ is nostalgia/minimalism: farm-to-table, vinyl, Moleskines. When I don’t have a (well-kept) seasonal beard, I shave using a brush and razor (4-blades. No safety razor for me) because it simply does a better job. Same thing with quality of sound from vinyl. But it’s also this kind of shit that people hate hipsters for. With a beard, I well fit in to that Lumbersexual category. I own a lot of plaid (I’ve always loved it), wear skinny jeans (but with my guns, all jeans are skinny…yeah…) and even have some nice boots that I wear often. I also love the shit out of my iPhone. It makes my life easier. And I haven’t written in cursive in years.

    As for the younger generation. A lot of that is training/upbringing. I was taught to take my hat off when coming inside (any building. Restaurant, house, mall, whatever). When I have kids, they’ll be taught the same thing. Pay attention to the people your with, not those elsewhere. It’s just fucking manners and it can still be taught.

    Maybe we can replicate this post in the other thread. Very well put. I think the safety razor is partly down to skin/hair type. I hack the shit out of my face if I use anything less than 3 blades, but on the guns pretty much anything works, but the hair on the guns is much finer than what comes out of my face/neck.

  12. @VeloVita – Done. I’ve never had a request before. Part of it has to do with convenience. I personally have no problem with using technology to my advantage. Four blades saves some time (and my face)…Rule #33…compliance issues…I do know from getting a couple tattoos on my shin/calf that four blades work well there. And if I were to go full-compliance, my legs would be fucking smooth.

  13. Ah, hipsterism involves minimalism. This explains the odd species I see wearing eyeglasses with no lenses.

  14. My small future has finally arrived.

    The Narrative Clip is a tiny, automatic camera and app that gives you a searchable and shareable photographic memory.

  15. @wiscot

    @Ccos

    @frank

    @ChrissyOne

    And when there was no crawdad, we ate sand.

    You’re from Mississippi?

    Nope, their school system may suck, but someone from Mississippi knows one eats a crawfish not a crawdad (though they be the same thing).

    “I’ll be taking these Huggies and whatever cash you got in the box…”

    Ooohhh . . . is that a nice little Raising Arizona reference you’ve slipped in there?

    ChrissyOne gets the genius grant for starting that one.

  16. I don’t know – they were jammies! They had Yodas ‘n’ shit on ’em!

  17. @Ron

    Cuts right across all levels of intelligence. My acetate frames have prescription lenses. My own experience, having spent a good chunk of my college career in the art department, much of the minimalism is the result of being broke (as a result of the high price of art supplies/booze/drugs). Now I have no money because it all goes to bike-related stuff.

  18. @wiscot

    +1

  19. this sport needs more of the stage left and center crowd.

  20. @SamFromTex

    @frank

    @PeakInTwoYears

    @ErikdR

    Charcoal and goose quills, ya youngsters! * shuffles back to stone slab and chisel*

    I have cut my own quill pens. Quill pens suck. Certain types of objects found the apogee of their design in the early 20th century. Pens and shaving equipment fall into this category.

    I was given a safety razor (with beautiful stand, soap cup if that’s what its called, and brush) for Christmas. I find it very similar to gluing tubulars; its harder and takes more time, but it forces you to spend a little bit of time focusing on the simple task at hand. In the case of tubs, its gluing it on nice and straight; in the case of shaving it’s getting yourself ready to look your best.

    I have to say, after the fear of slitting my own throat subsided, I am a massive fan.

    Its fun to need a tub of glue to set a tire, and its fun to need a sharps container to shave.

    I will not, however, use the safety razor on The Guns. If I miss a patch on my face, that’s just my coworkers who have to suffer. If I miss a patch on my legs, I’m bound to notice just as my head frops as The V is escaping my body.

    After you get used to the safety razor (they really are just as safe as the cheap ones) sit down and do the math. I was amazed at how much cheaper they turn out to be compared to the HYPER TURBO MACH EIGHTEEN SUPER FAST ULTRA whatever

    If these razors get any more high tech n turbo we’ll be riding them to work

  21. @SamFromTex

    @frank

    @PeakInTwoYears

    @ErikdR

    Charcoal and goose quills, ya youngsters! * shuffles back to stone slab and chisel*

    I have cut my own quill pens. Quill pens suck. Certain types of objects found the apogee of their design in the early 20th century. Pens and shaving equipment fall into this category.

    I was given a safety razor (with beautiful stand, soap cup if that’s what its called, and brush) for Christmas. I find it very similar to gluing tubulars; its harder and takes more time, but it forces you to spend a little bit of time focusing on the simple task at hand. In the case of tubs, its gluing it on nice and straight; in the case of shaving it’s getting yourself ready to look your best.

    I have to say, after the fear of slitting my own throat subsided, I am a massive fan.

    Its fun to need a tub of glue to set a tire, and its fun to need a sharps container to shave.

    I will not, however, use the safety razor on The Guns. If I miss a patch on my face, that’s just my coworkers who have to suffer. If I miss a patch on my legs, I’m bound to notice just as my head frops as The V is escaping my body.

    After you get used to the safety razor (they really are just as safe as the cheap ones) sit down and do the math. I was amazed at how much cheaper they turn out to be compared to the HYPER TURBO MACH EIGHTEEN SUPER FAST ULTRA whatever

    @PeakinTwoYears couldn’t agree more. I liken it to making espresso. I used to have a beautiful little Francis X1 and a burr grinder. Bought my beans from a cool place that roast every Friday morning and that hadn’t had a refit since 1965. It took me 8 or 9 minutes each morning to make an espresso. It wasn’t perfect every day; sometimes I over tamped, sometimes under, but when I got it right it was like angels dancing on my tongue. Then I had kids and 8 or 9 minutes in the morning felt like a lifetime. I sold out… Bought a Nespresso machine, discovered the Dharkan espresso pod which is rated 11, just like the amp in Spinal Tap! My machine makes wonderful espresso every time, but…it is soulless. I don’t love it like I truly loved my X1. We find pleasure in life by things not being easy, “if it’s easy it ain’t worth having” just like in cycling. I love a fast descent, but shit as I am at climbing, it’s where I find pleasure. The pleasure is in the difficulty and the challenge. The Nespresso is going on ebay!!

  22. @gilly

    Would want this in my future too.

  23. Friends.

    I hope you’re roasting your own fucking coffee.

  24. Seriously. No bullshit. It makes more aesthetic and economic sense than using a safety razor. Way more.

  25. @PeakInTwoYears

    Seriously. No bullshit. It makes more aesthetic and economic sense than using a safety razor. Way more.

    I’ve had quite a bit of wine and whisky (note no E) tonight but I’m sure I fail to work out how roasting your own coffee makes more sense that using a safety razor.

  26. @gilly

    @SamFromTex

    @frank

    @PeakInTwoYears

    @ErikdR

    Charcoal and goose quills, ya youngsters! * shuffles back to stone slab and chisel*

    I have cut my own quill pens. Quill pens suck. Certain types of objects found the apogee of their design in the early 20th century. Pens and shaving equipment fall into this category.

    I was given a safety razor (with beautiful stand, soap cup if that’s what its called, and brush) for Christmas. I find it very similar to gluing tubulars; its harder and takes more time, but it forces you to spend a little bit of time focusing on the simple task at hand. In the case of tubs, its gluing it on nice and straight; in the case of shaving it’s getting yourself ready to look your best.

    I have to say, after the fear of slitting my own throat subsided, I am a massive fan.

    Its fun to need a tub of glue to set a tire, and its fun to need a sharps container to shave.

    I will not, however, use the safety razor on The Guns. If I miss a patch on my face, that’s just my coworkers who have to suffer. If I miss a patch on my legs, I’m bound to notice just as my head frops as The V is escaping my body.

    After you get used to the safety razor (they really are just as safe as the cheap ones) sit down and do the math. I was amazed at how much cheaper they turn out to be compared to the HYPER TURBO MACH EIGHTEEN SUPER FAST ULTRA whatever

    @PeakinTwoYears couldn’t agree more. I liken it to making espresso. I used to have a beautiful little Francis X1 and a burr grinder. Bought my beans from a cool place that roast every Friday morning and that hadn’t had a refit since 1965. It took me 8 or 9 minutes each morning to make an espresso. It wasn’t perfect every day; sometimes I over tamped, sometimes under, but when I got it right it was like angels dancing on my tongue. Then I had kids and 8 or 9 minutes in the morning felt like a lifetime. I sold out… Bought a Nespresso machine, discovered the Dharkan espresso pod which is rated 11, just like the amp in Spinal Tap! My machine makes wonderful espresso every time, but…it is soulless. I don’t love it like I truly loved my X1. We find pleasure in life by things not being easy, “if it’s easy it ain’t worth having” just like in cycling. I love a fast descent, but shit as I am at climbing, it’s where I find pleasure. The pleasure is in the difficulty and the challenge. The Nespresso is going on ebay!!

    There’s a great quote in It Might Get Loud by Jack White; he says something to the effect that technology makes life easier, but it doesn’t make someone a more creative person. I love that sentiment; the implication that a fight makes you want something more and when you want something more you try harder. He then goes on to talk about the eighties and engineers spending weeks getting the perfect gate on a snare drum mic instead of musicians focussing on playing music.

    Then you figure into that the engineers talking about recording Stevie Ray Vaughan; they stopped trying to have the band play in separate rooms and overdubbing and all that to get a cleaner recording; the simple fact was that whenever Stevie played with headphones, he’d get into the music and start wandering around the room as he played and trip over the cables. It was worth having some bleed just to have the band play from the heart and finish without someone falling over.

  27. @unversio

    @gilly

    Would want this in my future too.

    She is a beauty. Had her but I let her go…

  28. I’m old. I remember the 80’s, and steel frames, the first time around. But I think any complaint about youth should start and end with this:

    “Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for their elders and love chatter in place of exercise; they no longer rise when elders enter the room; they contradict their parents, chatter before company; gobble up their food and tyrannize their teachers.”

    — Socrates

    I think Frank’s piece was great because it embraced the beauty of history as well as the wonder of the new.

    Cycling by its nature has a close relationship with engineering. Engineering almost always gets better over time.

    But engineering isn’t everything. I still remember being burnt off on a climb by someone on a beautiful 60’s celeste Bianchi, straight cut cogs and all.

    But at the same time I’m glad I don’t have to worry about my standard chainset (no other choice!) chipping the paint on my chainstay every time I sprinted – and not because I was a strong sprinter.

  29. @Teocalli

    I’ve had quite a bit of wine and whisky (note no E) tonight but I’m sure I fail to work out how roasting your own coffee makes more sense that using a safety razor.

    It’s a long time since I’ve been asked to show my work on a maths problem.

    Enjoying your shave

    Getting a closer shave

    + Saving a bit of money

    “”””””””””””””””””””

    24

    Drinking the freshest coffee possible

    Finely controlling the color and flavor of every batch

    + Saving forty US dollars every single month

    “”””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””

    42

  30. @PeakInTwoYears

    @Teocalli

    I’ve had quite a bit of wine and whisky (note no E) tonight but I’m sure I fail to work out how roasting your own coffee makes more sense that using a safety razor.

    It’s a long time since I’ve been asked to show my work on a maths problem.

    Enjoying your shave

    Getting a closer shave

    + Saving a bit of money

    “”””””””””””””””””””

    24

    Drinking the freshest coffee possible

    Finely controlling the color and flavor of every batch

    + Saving forty US dollars every single month

    “”””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””

    42

    Maths would not have been my strong point last night………………….

  31. @SamV

    The juxtaposition of waxing nostalgic here vs. the hipster bashing in the previous thread is amusing to me – especially all the Moleskine love. I’m a center-stager here (28) and I think much of my generation (the core segment of aforementioned hipsters) wrestles with essentially growing up half-digital, as opposed to (damn) kids these days who are digital native and the (old) people who are older than us who have adopted and adapted to digital living.

    A big part of ‘hipsterism’ is nostalgia/minimalism: farm-to-table, vinyl, Moleskines. When I don’t have a (well-kept) seasonal beard, I shave using a brush and razor (4-blades. No safety razor for me) because it simply does a better job. Same thing with quality of sound from vinyl. But it’s also this kind of shit that people hate hipsters for. With a beard, I well fit in to that Lumbersexual category. I own a lot of plaid (I’ve always loved it), wear skinny jeans (but with my guns, all jeans are skinny…yeah…) and even have some nice boots that I wear often. I also love the shit out of my iPhone. It makes my life easier. And I haven’t written in cursive in years.

    As for the younger generation. A lot of that is training/upbringing. I was taught to take my hat off when coming inside (any building. Restaurant, house, mall, whatever). When I have kids, they’ll be taught the same thing. Pay attention to the people your with, not those elsewhere. It’s just fucking manners and it can still be taught.

    Pretty much. I’m solidly in the center stage crowd, too. I don’t understand all the hate directed to people who use technology native (maybe a lot of get off my lawn going around, and not just on this site), although I do wish students would knock it off in class. As for the whole farm-to-table organic thing, I’d just rather support my local businesses. If I would rather buy from the LBS than Nashbar, why not from the farmers market rather than the Safeway? But, yeah. dbags that insist on wearing their ballcaps at the table next to me drive me bananas, especially when they’re coupled with dbag tshirts and in a nice restaurant. Don’t even get me started on not holding doors for people.

  32. @gilly

    Oooh, lovely.We use a Gaggia Classic, the VMH used to pull espresso for a living and the Gaggia won a lengthy comparison test – hit her sweet spot as far as pressure/durability/price.

  33. @gilly

    @PeakinTwoYears couldn’t agree more. I liken it to making espresso. I used to have a beautiful little Francis X1 and a burr grinder. Bought my beans from a cool place that roast every Friday morning and that hadn’t had a refit since 1965. It took me 8 or 9 minutes each morning to make an espresso. It wasn’t perfect every day; sometimes I over tamped, sometimes under, but when I got it right it was like angels dancing on my tongue. Then I had kids and 8 or 9 minutes in the morning felt like a lifetime. I sold out… Bought a Nespresso machine, discovered the Dharkan espresso pod which is rated 11, just like the amp in Spinal Tap! My machine makes wonderful espresso every time, but…it is soulless. I don’t love it like I truly loved my X1. We find pleasure in life by things not being easy, “if it’s easy it ain’t worth having” just like in cycling. I love a fast descent, but shit as I am at climbing, it’s where I find pleasure. The pleasure is in the difficulty and the challenge. The Nespresso is going on ebay!!

    I love my Nespresso machine dearly, I can make my double espresso at the same time as the porridge and while hassling the kids to get dressed, organised and fed. It’s the one time of the day when multi tasking is acceptable. If I didn’t I’d have to get up 20 minutes earlier and good deep sleep has way more soul than any coffee known to man.

    Besides, my second double espresso of the day come from here, is infinitely more awesome than any thing that I could make at home and the guy who makes it gets to worry about financing and cleaning the coffee machine.

  34. @frank

    Some great thoughts there. I really enjoyed ItMightGetLoud for all those small quotes and insights. Also am a longtime SRV fan and used to love turning his records up loud (Couldn’t Stand the Weather was one of the first albums I bought…waaaayy back then..) so you could hear all the background between takes. Sometimes you could hear the amp buzzing.

    When it comes to the ultimate and most covetable espresso machine, it has to be a Rocket doesn’t it?

    http://www.rocket-espresso.com/domestic/

  35. @PT

    @frank

    Some great thoughts there. I really enjoyed ItMightGetLoud for all those small quotes and insights. Also am a longtime SRV fan and used to love turning his records up loud (Couldn’t Stand the Weather was one of the first albums I bought…waaaayy back then..) so you could hear all the background between takes. Sometimes you could hear the amp buzzing.

    When it comes to the ultimate and most covetable espresso machine, it has to be a Rocket doesn’t it?

    http://www.rocket-espresso.com/domestic/

    This Rocket Giotto in particular, tho at 1500GBP, a bit rich for most

  36. Dammit, here’s the link…http://www.rapha.cc/gb/en/shop/rocket-espresso-machine/product/REM01

  37. Or, combine the 2 greatest things in life with this

    http://www.velopresso.cc/

  38. @Chris

    @gilly

    @PeakinTwoYears couldn’t agree more. I liken it to making espresso. I used to have a beautiful little Francis X1 and a burr grinder. Bought my beans from a cool place that roast every Friday morning and that hadn’t had a refit since 1965. It took me 8 or 9 minutes each morning to make an espresso. It wasn’t perfect every day; sometimes I over tamped, sometimes under, but when I got it right it was like angels dancing on my tongue. Then I had kids and 8 or 9 minutes in the morning felt like a lifetime. I sold out… Bought a Nespresso machine, discovered the Dharkan espresso pod which is rated 11, just like the amp in Spinal Tap! My machine makes wonderful espresso every time, but…it is soulless. I don’t love it like I truly loved my X1. We find pleasure in life by things not being easy, “if it’s easy it ain’t worth having” just like in cycling. I love a fast descent, but shit as I am at climbing, it’s where I find pleasure. The pleasure is in the difficulty and the challenge. The Nespresso is going on ebay!!

    I love my Nespresso machine dearly, I can make my double espresso at the same time as the porridge and while hassling the kids to get dressed, organised and fed. It’s the one time of the day when multi tasking is acceptable. If I didn’t I’d have to get up 20 minutes earlier and good deep sleep has way more soul than any coffee known to man.

    Besides, my second double espresso of the day come from here, is infinitely more awesome than any thing that I could make at home and the guy who makes it gets to worry about financing and cleaning the coffee machine.

    Hey @Chris, apologies for dissing the machine, I was welling in nostalgia for my old Francis. What a stunning place for your second Dopio of the day, you must find it hard to leave

  39. @gilly

    No apologies required. Did you ever try the Indriya, “only” a 9 but very smooth.

    Entoteca is a top spot and you could quite easily be fooled into thinking you were in Italy when waiting at the bar for your coffee. The really hard time to leave, though, is after lunch, the char grilled rib eye is stunning. It’s the sort of place where it’s best to order a bunch of dishes and share.

  40. @wiscot

    Did they take their caps off at least? (If they were wearing them) That’s another thing that irks me – going into an eatery and seeing boys/men wearing goddamn caps. And while I’m ranting, it also irks me to see guys going on dates where the lady has made some effort to look attractive (wash hair, apply make-up, wear something clean and nice) while the guy rolls in wearing whatever didn’t smell too bad in the laundry basket. And a fucking baseball cap.Apparently teaching cursive in schools (here in WI anyway) isn’t a “thing” anymore. Apparently, we’ll all be communicating in shorthand and emoticons in the future.There will be no need for being able to “write” anymore – and if the need arises, some pitiful scrawl in capitals will apparently suffice.

    Merckx have mercy on us all . . .

    Don’t get me started! My son, 9, has to take an iPad and get this… a calculator this year! In grade 4! I didn’t get to use a calculator until grade 10, and don’t get me started on iPads. He can’t keep track of his hat which has to be on his head whenever he exits a classroom let alone an iPad.

  41. @Chris

    I do love a Moleskine, I buy a new one for each project I start. As for propelling pencils, I can still remember having one of these in primary school.STAEDTLER-780C-Mars-Technico-2-0-mm-Mechanical-LEAD-HOLDER-Clutch-Pencil-BLUE

    Endless happy wasted taking it apart and putting it back together…

    Actually I have two of those on my desk right now. Used daily. I remember when I started full time work with one and I was considered a “young upstart” who didn’t know the pleasure of working with pencils. Well, look at me now!

  42. @wilburrox

    The future’s gonna bring a cure for cancer and cold fusion. You’ll think your thoughts in to digitized recording. And it’ll all be thanks to these kiddos that grew up staring in to their phones. As a result of gaming on line together they’ll be communicating and collabrating across time zones and borders w/o any sense of wow. Going to university? Bahhh… Can’t come soon enough.

    You’re right, but I can wait. Those kids staring into their devices all day will have improved on the already excellent algorithms that allow computers to think, to create and in short, replace humans in 90% of jobs. It’s here already, just needs perfecting and to become a bit cheaper. Googles already got a car that drives itself, there are algorithms that diagnose cancer, write poetry, blogs, news stories and you’d be flat out noticing they are not human. That’s just today, imagine what another 20 years will bring. They’ll be living in their walled and guarded (by robots) mansion living it up. What we’ll be doing is living in a slum killing each other for the slightest bit of food just to stay alive.

  43. @Chris

    @gilly

    No apologies required. Did you ever try the Indriya, “only” a 9 but very smooth.

    Entoteca is a top spot and you could quite easily be fooled into thinking you were in Italy when waiting at the bar for your coffee. The really hard time to leave, though, is after lunch, the char grilled rib eye is stunning. It’s the sort of place where it’s best to order a bunch of dishes and share.

    Yes, I like Indriya ( from India!) that extra bit of info always tickles me, but Dharkan and Kazaar are my main squeezes at the moment.

  44. Yes we’ve got a Nespresso in the office – it’s better than instant, faster than brewed (and stewed) and a lot easier than me pulling shots for six people at a meeting.

    @gilly +1 to Kazaa – it’s another ’11’ although I don’t find it overly strong but it has a lovely chocolatey base if you like that sort of thing. Perfect to follow lunch.

  45. @Puffy

    Don’t get me started! My son, 9, has to take an iPad and get this… a calculator this year! In grade 4! I didn’t get to use a calculator until grade 10, and don’t get me started on iPads. He can’t keep track of his hat which has to be on his head whenever he exits a classroom let alone an iPad.

    iPad is stretching it, but I’ve had to take a calculator to school in grade 4 as well, and that was 15 years ago. Funny, because I’m now finishing a degree in Physics and haven’t needed one for the last three years.

  46. @Chris

    @gilly

    No apologies required. Did you ever try the Indriya, “only” a 9 but very smooth.

    Entoteca is a top spot and you could quite easily be fooled into thinking you were in Italy when waiting at the bar for your coffee. The really hard time to leave, though, is after lunch, the char grilled rib eye is stunning. It’s the sort of place where it’s best to order a bunch of dishes and share.

    To think I go through Devonshire Square daily and have never noticed it.

    That will be rectified tomorrow!

    David

  47. @ChrisO

    Yes we’ve got a Nespresso in the office – it’s better than instant, faster than brewed (and stewed) and a lot easier than me pulling shots for six people at a meeting.

    @gilly +1 to Kazaa – it’s another ’11’ although I don’t find it overly strong but it has a lovely chocolatey base if you like that sort of thing. Perfect to follow lunch.

    Those two are good, but whatever the orange lungo is actually called. That one. Right there.

  48. @PeakInTwoYears

    Clearly right-handed.

    The eye-talic nib cut is the wrong way othewise.

    Cheers,

    Will

    William M. deRosset

    Fort Collins, CO

  49. @WMdeR

    @PeakInTwoYears

    Clearly right-handed.

    The eye-talic nib cut is the wrong way othewise.

    Cheers,

    Will

    William M. deRosset

    Fort Collins, CO

    You’re a cop, aren’t you?

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar