The LeMond Revolution

Reverence: LeMond Revolution

Reverence: LeMond Revolution

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I read recently that a number of Pros like to ride the turbo for an hour or so before having breakfast in the morning to jump start the old metabolic system. Which means that now I ride the trainer for an hour in the morning before breakfast. I think the Pros probably do it to lose weight, and I do it partly for that reason but also to burn off the hangover which comes as a result of my status as a semi-professional drinker.

I used to ride an old Tacx trainer, but I found riding the device only slightly preferable to shoving bamboo shoots under my fingernails. Then I got a LeMond Revolution and now I actually look forward to my morning sessions. I’d been interested in the LeMond Revolution trainers for some time, but it wasn’t until I discovered that the device is based on a direct-drive trainer that Greg’s coach built for him in the 80’s that I decided to embark on my new morning ritual at the mercy of one. After all, if it was good enough to help LeMan become a Tour de France winner, then surly it was good enough to help me get less fat and become less of a weakling.

The first thing you notice about these little numbers that you remove the rear wheel from your bike and mount the Revolution in its place. This means no wheel slippage on the mag and what amounts to a remarkably pleasant ride feel. The second thing you notice about the trainer is that its bloody hard to spin up; I start crossed in a 53×26 and can hardly turn the pedals at first, but there is no way I’m shifting into my little ring on a trainer on account of my not being a giant sissy. The third thing you notice is that it’s actually fun to ride; I turn on some old Cycling movies and before I know it, I find my buzzer going off indicating the hour has already passed. I had no idea riding a trainer didn’t have to suck.

But lets be clear: we are road cyclists, and we ride on the road. A long ride in the cold wind and rain is preferable to even an hour on an indoor trainer. But trainers do represent an important training tool and as such should be a part of every Cyclist’s arsenal. I’m on it every morning, and as the season looms I’m looking to it more and more for intervals and power work. Not to mention that as I prepare for my Hour ride on Festum Prophetae, I’m training Obree Style on my Revolution.

Before we get too carried away with this indoor riding business, let’s review some examples of acceptable reasons to ride a trainer:

  1. Strength and/or interval training.
  2. Pedaling technique work.
  3. Hour Record simulation training.
  4. Pre-breakfast rides to help lose weight, assuming you still hit the road after breakfast.
  5. Recovery from injury.

Examples of unacceptable reasons to ride a trainer:

  1. Its raining outside and you don’t want to get wet.
  2. Its cold outside and you don’t want to get cold.
  3. Its windy outside and you don’t want to get blown around.
  4. Its cold and wet outside and you don’t want to get cold and wet.
  5. Its cold and wet and windy out and you don’t want to get blown around while getting cold and wet.
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// Accessories and Gear // Product Review // Reverence // Technique // Technology

  1. @Weldertron

    I hear you. I live in Quebec.

    The Castelli Nanoflex stuff is very warm. Same fabric as their warmest tights. water resistant to boot.

    Yes, I like it, too. Where I live, near Seattle, it’s only cool and not cold, and their Gabba rain jersey and Nanoflex warmers are good for me for much of the year.

  2. @Chris I really don’t give a fuck what you call Frank, or whether he’s offended. I’m not Dutch, but sometimes I wear wooden shoes when wanking.

    The point I was making is that you used a term derogatory to an entire community, and to a subset of this community. Your logic suggests anything is fair game, as long as your intentions are pure. Does this go for the N-word as well? Would members be too uptight if they objected to me sprinkling that around, all-in-good-fun?

    Members have been chastised for using language that conflates triathletes with a pejorative term for persons with developmental disabilities. Rightly so. There have been measures to tone down sexist language and make the site more inclusive to women. Chapeau! If the community cannot see the value in doing the same on this front (members, goodwill, looking fantastic), what does that say about the other part of Rule #43? “Always remember, we’re all brothers and sisters on the road.”

     

     

  3. @JohnB I can’t tell if you’re being ironic or really don’t know much about Fry.

  4. @andrew

    I’ve driven from Bainbridge Island to Port Townsend, and just the thought of riding some of those narrow roads with those drivers in the wet is enough to bring on vicarious testicle retraction. Respect.

    Yep, that’s roughly my neighborhood. I live just south of Bainbridge Island.
    http://www.strava.com/activities/107871441

    The riding is wonderful, but as you suspect… conflating too many of those dangerous ingredients is a recipe for a crap day. I went out for a night ride last night, but I’m lucky to have a 3.2 km residential loop near my house. Little traffic and perfect for throwing down V laps or so. But the major roads can be deadly, and there aren’t many cyclists around, so people don’t tend to look for them.

  5. @pistard

    @Chris Alienating recumbent riders is one thing…they choose to ride them. But if the community is going to tolerate homophobic slurs, that’s me out.

    If I’d have recognized the word in question as a homophobic slur, certainly it would have registered.

    @Chris

    However, if Frank is offended or feels that he’s been the victim of a homophobic slur, I’m truly sorry. Without the intent, though, it isn’t really any different to calling him a cunt.

    I’m not offended personally but do feel those things are on the short list of words not to use around here; I’d much prefer you call me something more clever or melodious, like “you dutch fooking useless fooking koont” like Pavé William does.

    And to close down our argument, I am truly sorry that you slip into a rage when you see someone wearing clothing that isn’t stretched like a condom over a watermelon. I appreciate that you’re not afforded that opportunity, and am here to help you with that any time you’re ready to talk.

  6. @frank Touché…

  7. @Chris

    Whatever, it’s still too baggy…

    “He’s say’n thatitz t’baggeh!”

  8. “With all due respect…F….k you!”-Rickie Bobbie

  9. I really like the idea of these trainers that don’t require a rear wheel/tire…much easier than my Green Machine and having to have a rear wheel and training tire built up specifically for when I need to ride indoors. 

    That being said, I have to give kudos to the Kinetic by Kurt…it just works.  Doesn’t make a lot of noise.  Folds up and slides into an inconspicuous location to keep the wife reasonably content.  And, it’s reasonably priced at half the price of the LeMan.

  10. @ChrissyOne

    @andrew

    I’ve driven from Bainbridge Island to Port Townsend, and just the thought of riding some of those narrow roads with those drivers in the wet is enough to bring on vicarious testicle retraction. Respect.

    Yep, that’s roughly my neighborhood. I live just south of Bainbridge Island.
    http://www.strava.com/activities/107871441

    The riding is wonderful, but as you suspect… conflating too many of those dangerous ingredients is a recipe for a crap day. I went out for a night ride last night, but I’m lucky to have a 3.2 km residential loop near my house. Little traffic and perfect for throwing down V laps or so. But the major roads can be deadly, and there aren’t many cyclists around, so people don’t tend to look for them.

    There is some wonderful riding south of Port Townsend. We have some faves over there. There are some dicey bits on Hwy 20 (links PT to 101), but the valleys and ridges in the Chimacum area and the Toandos peninsula (south of 104 on Hood Canal) are fabulous. Thorndyke Rd. on the Toandos is a good climb–or series of climbs, however you want to count it–and it just happens to be part of an exact metric century from our house.

  11. @kixsand

    I really like the idea of these trainers that don’t require a rear wheel/tire…much easier than my Green Machine and having to have a rear wheel and training tire built up specifically for when I need to ride indoors.

    That being said, I have to give kudos to the Kinetic by Kurt…it just works. Doesn’t make a lot of noise. Folds up and slides into an inconspicuous location to keep the wife reasonably content. And, it’s reasonably priced at half the price of the LeMan.

         I bought my buddy’s Kinetic from him back in November (he only used it twice) and have been very pleased. I thought the rear wheel/skewer thing for the Kinetic was going to be a much big deal, but it wasn’t. And I figure I’ll just buy a new back tire before the spring season starts. Like you said, “it just works.” I bought it for me and the gf, but she doesn’t find it comfortable, so I have it all to myself. The fact that it folds up is a bonus – we live in a two bedroom apartment (one is ours…well, and our two cats…and the other is devoted to bikes), so we have to move everything out of there when we have company. We’ve already decided our next place needs to have three bedrooms.

  12. @unversio

    @Chris

    Whatever, it’s still too baggy…

    “He’s say’n thatitz t’baggeh!”

    Is that Rik van Looy in the middle? The kit has a certain “Flandria” vibe to it and Merckx knows the guns are big enough. Those pants are just there not to scare everyone else.

  13. FWIW: Just a thought for the winter trainer crowd: Find a cheap rear wheel and make it your permanent trainer wheel. I do it with an old Alex wheel that came on my Giant years ago. I use up old or odd tires on the trainer too.

  14. @pistard Irony. Big fan of Fry.

  15. @wiscot

    FWIW: Just a thought for the winter trainer crowd: Find a cheap rear wheel and make it your permanent trainer wheel. I do it with an old Alex wheel that came on my Giant years ago. I use up old or odd tires on the trainer too.

    I do the same, mine even has a lump when ridden on the road, but because the QR is locked in, to don’t even feel it on the trainer. A great use for damaged rims, wobbly rims, lumpy rims. Wouldn’t ride it on the rollers though!

  16. Re the noise of wind trainers, yeah. My first was a Vetta Lugano, single roller double fan nightmare white noise at whatever wattage I could force out. Used to put on albums up loud and take short breaks to flip them, so the 20 minute x 3 with short rests workout made perfect sense the first time I read about it. Well, except that I was so obsessed they’d be 4 or 5 albums long, and the intervals would be keeping tempo for however long a song lasted despite what my agonized lungs might have to say about it.

    Found a 2 roller 4 fan Vetta on ebay a few years ago, far quieter owing to the reduced rpm. Interestingly, given the lack of a flywheel, this rig best simulates climbing, as the wind resistance kills the momentum swiftly and you get a surgy feel. Super cool. Now if I could only rock the bike….

  17. I’ve been using a Revolution for a few years now. It’s a great machine but I understand that the same couldn’t be said for the clunky & expensive Power Pilot meter (which I never bought). Instead I mounted a £25 Bontrager Ant+ speed sensor to the top of the trainer such that it picks up a signal from the magnet which is already embedded in the large wheel which drives the toothed belt. I then managed to work out the speed / power curve for the machine using various bits of info from around the inter web.

    More recently I joined Trainer Road and was delighted to find that my speed / power curve pretty closely matches their virtual power algorithm.

    If any of you have a Revolution without a Power Pilot and aren’t using TR, but would like a copy of the speed / power curve just drop me a line. The only real draw back to my approach is that it doesn’t compensate for changes in air density due to temperature, as of course this affects the work needed to spin that fan.

  18. @wiscot

    @unversio

    @Chris

    Whatever, it’s still too baggy…

    “He’s say’n thatitz t’baggeh!”

    Is that Rik van Looy in the middle? The kit has a certain “Flandria” vibe to it and Merckx knows the guns are big enough. Those pants are just there not to scare everyone else.

    Rider with the shirt tucked in — he could be nicknamed “The Knife” (not really sure why). Incredible typography on the support car.

  19. Not quite on a trainer, but a article about the path to LeMan going for the hour.

    Found in Bicycle Guide, May 1991 that was found in a pile of women’s mags at mum’s house.

  20. @Gasman Jim

    I’d be interested in getting that for sure! You can find my email on the Keepers page.

  21. @frank

    @roadslave

    Did you really just post a bunch of jibberish that I had to delete for you before posting a screenshot of bankrupt power data, all while talking about Looking Fantastic?

    If anyone is struggling to define irony, I think that’s a great place to start.

    Guilty.  Although to be fair, I’m always talking about Looking Fantastic – just wish I could look it occasionally.  At least I’m not the one publishing articles on the inter webs about turbo trainers #nerd #yesiknow

  22. @frank. I have made a realization. You are training seriously for this year’s PF Hour! Good on you!

  23. @sthilzy

    Not quite on a trainer, but a article about the path to LeMan going for the hour.

    Found in Bicycle Guide, May 1991 that was found in a pile of women’s mags at mum’s house.

    Thanx for posting this LeMan article

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