Sure, turn that thing upside down. (I said it ironically, so it's not bad luck.)

On Rule #49: Keep the Rubber Side Down

by / / 88 posts

Gobbles already violated Rule #95 this year when he became the first rider to celebrate winning a Monument by lifting his bike over his head as if he were some kind of savage; not a Belgian road Cyclist, the most civilized of the Cycling Breed.

But Rule #49 is another matter altogether. It astounds me whenever I see a bicycle helplessly turned upon its handlebars and saddle while the pilot optimistically leverages every muscle in their face to inspect the vehicle for evidence of its mysterious ailment. (Surprise ending: It’s the rider, not the machine.)

We, the Velominati, we see the Cycling world through a different lens. We see Cycling through the rose-colored lense of our passion and our reverence for the history, culture, and etiquette of our sport.

Hence, I find myself in disbelief to find none other than The Prophet himself, cluelessly riding alongside his team car in 1976 with a spare bike on its roof inexplicably turned upside down. This was the Year of My Birth; I feel a little bit sullied knowing that such an atrocity occurred while I was in gestation. (It also might explain a few things about my temperament.)

It just so happens that 1976 was the year in which Merckx began his irrevocable slide towards retirement; perhaps his failure to spot the upturned steed was an early sign that the fire in his breath was starting to temper.

// Anatomy of a Photo // The Hardmen // The Rules

  1. @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

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  2. @KogaLover

    Once you managed to make it work, can you use your right shoulder to sport a camera to record it and then put it on here, Reminds me that while ago @frank wrote an article about how to jump onto a cyclocross saddle. We need such detailed description in this case too. Or I will ask GCN to show it.

    Like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pnbJ64zvME

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  3. @ErikdR

    @KogaLover

    Once you managed to make it work, can you use your right shoulder to sport a camera to record it and then put it on here, Reminds me that while ago @frank wrote an article about how to jump onto a cyclocross saddle. We need such detailed description in this case too. Or I will ask GCN to show it.

    Like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pnbJ64zvME

    Yeah that’s sort of what I do, except from behind and take the frame weight on my shoulder.

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  4. @ChrisO

    @ErikdR

    But seriously – as @Philip Mercer says: lay her gently down on the grass (or, even more gently, on pavement, if that cannot be avoided) with the drive side up. (I must admit at this point that it can be quite a challenge for someone as clumsy as yours truly, to successfully re-insert the rear wheel ‘with one hand’ while only having the other hand available to steady the machine. Front wheel = never a problem.) Clever tips, anyone?

    I use my left shoulder to brace the saddle and lift the bike up and I have the wheel upright between my legs. It leaves my left hand to hold the rear stay and bring it back and over the cassette and the right hand to push the rear mech down.

    I do the same thing. Except, being left handed, I put the saddle over my right shoulder, hold the wheel in the left hand, seat stay in the right hand. Works just fine. Well, unless it’s my MTB with disc brakes. Then there is much more fumbling and swearing trying to get things lined up.

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  5. @MangoDave

    @ChrisO

    @ErikdR

    But seriously – as @Philip Mercer says: lay her gently down on the grass (or, even more gently, on pavement, if that cannot be avoided) with the drive side up. (I must admit at this point that it can be quite a challenge for someone as clumsy as yours truly, to successfully re-insert the rear wheel ‘with one hand’ while only having the other hand available to steady the machine. Front wheel = never a problem.) Clever tips, anyone?

    I use my left shoulder to brace the saddle and lift the bike up and I have the wheel upright between my legs. It leaves my left hand to hold the rear stay and bring it back and over the cassette and the right hand to push the rear mech down.

    I do the same thing. Except, being left handed, I put the saddle over my right shoulder, hold the wheel in the left hand, seat stay in the right hand. Works just fine. Well, unless it’s my MTB with disc brakes. Then there is much more fumbling and swearing trying to get things lined up.

    Come to think of it, I’ve done this so many times I have no idea how I do it. Will investigate and report back. Feels strangely like explaining how to hold a pencil.

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  6. @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    He’s Dutch. Everyone around him gets on his goddamned nerves irrespective of the reason, il-fitting clothes or otherwise.

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  7. @frank

    @MangoDave

    @ChrisO

    @ErikdR

    But seriously – as @Philip Mercer says: lay her gently down on the grass (or, even more gently, on pavement, if that cannot be avoided) with the drive side up. (I must admit at this point that it can be quite a challenge for someone as clumsy as yours truly, to successfully re-insert the rear wheel ‘with one hand’ while only having the other hand available to steady the machine. Front wheel = never a problem.) Clever tips, anyone?

    I use my left shoulder to brace the saddle and lift the bike up and I have the wheel upright between my legs. It leaves my left hand to hold the rear stay and bring it back and over the cassette and the right hand to push the rear mech down.

    I do the same thing. Except, being left handed, I put the saddle over my right shoulder, hold the wheel in the left hand, seat stay in the right hand. Works just fine. Well, unless it’s my MTB with disc brakes. Then there is much more fumbling and swearing trying to get things lined up.

    Come to think of it, I’ve done this so many times I have no idea how I do it. Will investigate and report back. Feels strangely like explaining how to hold a pencil.

    I keep Menchov’s 2009 Giro mechanic on retainer. Whenever I flat, that bugger hops out of a waiting car and changes out my wheel in 4 seconds (or at least that’s who I channel when I’m doing it myself).

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  8. @ErikdR Correction: Or I will ask ErikdR to show it. As you know all Koga’s have this small chain hanger on the inside of the right rear stay and maybe I should stop using that. Will try!

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  9. @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    He’s Dutch. Everyone around him gets on his goddamned nerves irrespective of the reason, il-fitting clothes or otherwise.

    Bond villain with bike.

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  10. @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

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  11. @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    I think he’s pissed at Dumoulin for wearing the pink jersey with jeans. Not least, for wearing that oversized belt buckle…

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  12. @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    I think he’s pissed at Dumoulin for wearing the pink jersey with jeans. Not least, for wearing that oversized belt buckle…

    The jeans should definitely be black! Rule #15

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  13. @Rick

    @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    I think he’s pissed at Dumoulin for wearing the pink jersey with jeans. Not least, for wearing that oversized belt buckle…

    The jeans should definitely be black! Rule #15

    Boy, Jan Janssen was surely the Clark Kent of cycling, wasn’t he? Bespectacled nerd shows up with small carryall and bike. “Hi, can I help you sir?’ “Yes, I’m here to cause pain and suffering and be awesome.” “Ah, Mr Janssen, sorry, didn’t recognize you in civilian clothes. Right this way.”

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  14. Here’s Joop winning in 1985: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewA2Ssh8jVM The commentary is typical 80s American shit. Zoetemelk didn’t “steal” the race, he had two teammates in the break and it was a canny move in that he knew the others wouldn’t drag the two other Dutch riders (Van de Velde and Veldscholten) up there. Remember, Van de Velde won the Giro points title three times, young rider in the Tour, the Dauphine Libere. This, from wikipedia is pretty interesting: He was distinctive in the peloton for his lean, long-legged appearance, his smooth pedalling style and his long hair. He rode in support of riders such as Joop Zoetemelk, whom he could pace over mountains at impressive speed, but he was also capable of winning on his own. Success came to him early and, he said in an interview with the author Jan Siebelink (“Pijn is genot”) that he had trouble coping when that success began to dry up. Van der Velde said he remembered shivering at the start of an Italian race, the skin of his arms wrinkled in goosebumps, because of the amphetamine he had taken just to start. Addiction to amphetamine and a lifelong habit of petty theft, which he said came from seeing his father bring home things he had stolen from work, brought him into trouble with the law. He was caught stealing lawnmowers and breaking into post office stamp machines to raise money to cover his addiction and his gambling. The jail sentence and the loss of all he had won forced him and his Belgian wife, Josée, to sell the villa they had owned. They moved into a series of anonymous houses and apartments. Van der Velde began hospital treatment for his addiction and became deeply religious. He began work on building sites, rarely saying who he was or what he had been, to rebuild his self-esteem. For many years he tried to keep his address and his identity secret. Wow.

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  15. @frank

    @RobSandy

    I’m just going to say that this is one where I observe the Masturbation Principle. Sure, it might happen, once in a while. But I’m not going to brag about it and I’m sure as hell not going to do it with anyone watching. But I love the conjecture that the upside down bike so close to the Prophet’s mighty presence somehow sucked the V away.

    And its for sure his bike too – not a lowly teammates’ – the bar tape is white, whereas his teammates had blue tape such as on the one sitting on the car’s boot.

    Dunno… I would normally agree with you about the tape color, but look at this promo photo. All the tape is white. However, I’m willing to wager that either 1) they went all white for the photo shoot, and for races it was back to everyone else wearing blue; or 2) there are only 6 bikes in the photo so they very well could have all been Eddy’s. That said… have a seat before you take in this monstrosity. I’m sorry to say, I don’t think that race photo was an anomaly. (trigger warning: this fucker will cause you immense pain and suffering, and substantial V drainage; look at it quickly then avert your eyes and pretend it never happened. Unfortunately this may be one of those things you can’t un-see.)

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  16. @wiscot

    Here’s Joop winning in 1985: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewA2Ssh8jVM The commentary is typical 80s American shit. Zoetemelk didn’t “steal” the race, he had two teammates in the break and it was a canny move in that he knew the others wouldn’t drag the two other Dutch riders (Van de Velde and Veldscholten) up there. Remember, Van de Velde won the Giro points title three times, young rider in the Tour, the Dauphine Libere. This, from wikipedia is pretty interesting: He was distinctive in the peloton for his lean, long-legged appearance, his smooth pedalling style and his long hair. He rode in support of riders such as Joop Zoetemelk, whom he could pace over mountains at impressive speed, but he was also capable of winning on his own. Success came to him early and, he said in an interview with the author Jan Siebelink (“Pijn is genot”) that he had trouble coping when that success began to dry up. Van der Velde said he remembered shivering at the start of an Italian race, the skin of his arms wrinkled in goosebumps, because of the amphetamine he had taken just to start. Addiction to amphetamine and a lifelong habit of petty theft, which he said came from seeing his father bring home things he had stolen from work, brought him into trouble with the law. He was caught stealing lawnmowers and breaking into post office stamp machines to raise money to cover his addiction and his gambling. The jail sentence and the loss of all he had won forced him and his Belgian wife, Josée, to sell the villa they had owned. They moved into a series of anonymous houses and apartments. Van der Velde began hospital treatment for his addiction and became deeply religious. He began work on building sites, rarely saying who he was or what he had been, to rebuild his self-esteem. For many years he tried to keep his address and his identity secret. Wow.

    Amazing; but to be clear that is Van der Velde, not Janssen that the passage is talking about…

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  17. @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    5:39 “frankly Gary I’m a little surprised we’ve had a crash like this in a pro road race.” I can’t even…

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  18. @litvi

    @frank

    @RobSandy

    I’m just going to say that this is one where I observe the Masturbation Principle. Sure, it might happen, once in a while. But I’m not going to brag about it and I’m sure as hell not going to do it with anyone watching. But I love the conjecture that the upside down bike so close to the Prophet’s mighty presence somehow sucked the V away.

    And its for sure his bike too – not a lowly teammates’ – the bar tape is white, whereas his teammates had blue tape such as on the one sitting on the car’s boot.

    Dunno… I would normally agree with you about the tape color, but look at this promo photo. All the tape is white. However, I’m willing to wager that either 1) they went all white for the photo shoot, and for races it was back to everyone else wearing blue; or 2) there are only 6 bikes in the photo so they very well could have all been Eddy’s. That said… have a seat before you take in this monstrosity. I’m sorry to say, I don’t think that race photo was an anomaly. (trigger warning: this fucker will cause you immense pain and suffering, and substantial V drainage; look at it quickly then avert your eyes and pretend it never happened. Unfortunately this may be one of those things you can’t un-see.)

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

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  19. @litvi Inline dancing! Let’s dance, put on your black shoes and dance the blues.

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  20. @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @RobSandy

    I’m just going to say that this is one where I observe the Masturbation Principle. Sure, it might happen, once in a while. But I’m not going to brag about it and I’m sure as hell not going to do it with anyone watching. But I love the conjecture that the upside down bike so close to the Prophet’s mighty presence somehow sucked the V away.

    And its for sure his bike too – not a lowly teammates’ – the bar tape is white, whereas his teammates had blue tape such as on the one sitting on the car’s boot.

    Dunno… I would normally agree with you about the tape color, but look at this promo photo. All the tape is white. However, I’m willing to wager that either 1) they went all white for the photo shoot, and for races it was back to everyone else wearing blue; or 2) there are only 6 bikes in the photo so they very well could have all been Eddy’s. That said… have a seat before you take in this monstrosity. I’m sorry to say, I don’t think that race photo was an anomaly. (trigger warning: this fucker will cause you immense pain and suffering, and substantial V drainage; look at it quickly then avert your eyes and pretend it never happened. Unfortunately this may be one of those things you can’t un-see.)

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    I think I agree they are all Eddy’s bikes. Which gives us a much better explanation for the final chapter: the last nail in the coffin was having his bikes mounted upside down, on purpose, repeatedly. As it turns out, not even the Prophet could withstand that barrage of open and notorious disdain for the Rules. Such a tragedy.

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  21. @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    Jeazhus fucking Christ, is he an extra in a Fellini film here???

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  22. @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    Hadn’t LeMan chased down every fucking guy that went up the road to that point and finally he just said, “fuck it, I’m not chasing another guy down” and, of course, that “guy” ended up winning it. LeMan was so fucking strong. He took second in the sprint if I remember correctly through that haze of Grand Marnier on a Friday night in Germany with a big ride set for tomorrow.

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  23. @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    Hadn’t LeMan chased down every fucking guy that went up the road to that point and finally he just said, “fuck it, I’m not chasing another guy down” and, of course, that “guy” ended up winning it. LeMan was so fucking strong. He took second in the sprint if I remember correctly through that haze of Grand Marnier on a Friday night in Germany with a big ride set for tomorrow.

    Yes indeedy. I think LeMond was getting tired of chasing everything down and when Joop went, he thought “fuck it.” In the break of 13 that contested the finish (The next rider, Kim Andersen, came in at 13 seconds) there were 3 Dutch, 2 Italians, and 1 each from the US, France, GB, Austria, Spain, Belgium, Ireland and Switzerland. Clearly the Dutch had the upper hand and were not going to chase their compatriot. No-one else wanted to drag anyone else so Joop soloed away. LeMond beat Argentin for the sprint for second. One of the more well-deserved WC wins, that’s for sure.

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  24. @frank My apologies for not making that clear. The quote is about Van de Velde, not Janssen. In 1988, Johan van de Velde was first over the top of the Gavia on THAT stage. He lost 47 minutes by day’s end. The conditions were THAT bad.

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  25. @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    Hadn’t LeMan chased down every fucking guy that went up the road to that point and finally he just said, “fuck it, I’m not chasing another guy down” and, of course, that “guy” ended up winning it. LeMan was so fucking strong. He took second in the sprint if I remember correctly through that haze of Grand Marnier on a Friday night in Germany with a big ride set for tomorrow.

    Your hazy memory is correct, LeMan did take second in the sprint. In the post race interview he said he expected the Italians to chase down Joop. Unfortunately for Greg it was too close to the finish line.

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  26. @Rick

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    Hadn’t LeMan chased down every fucking guy that went up the road to that point and finally he just said, “fuck it, I’m not chasing another guy down” and, of course, that “guy” ended up winning it. LeMan was so fucking strong. He took second in the sprint if I remember correctly through that haze of Grand Marnier on a Friday night in Germany with a big ride set for tomorrow.

    Your hazy memory is correct, LeMan did take second in the sprint. In the post race interview he said he expected the Italians to chase down Joop. Unfortunately for Greg it was too close to the finish line.

    Fucking LeMan! What did he have … two wins and two seconds at the WC, right??? (fucked if I know–third glass of Grand Marnier is just BURYING me in bliss, Baby! Nothing like finally being off call after 10 days straight!

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  27. This wheel change talk has me baffled. Are people often struggling with this? Lie the bike against a bush or on some grass drive-side-up, do the work, then drop the upper jockey (correctly indexed) onto the 11, with left hand on seatpost, right hand on wheel rim, give the derailleur cage a gentle shove down-and-back and job’s done? Unless you have those weird horizontal dropouts… in which case, call the team car, because you need to abandon the race ASAP

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  28. @Teocalli

    or find a convenient tree as was posted here somewhere last year and hang the bike by it’s saddle. Re the Photo – maybe it’s a sign of distress like flying a national flag upside down?

    You rang?

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  29. @Mikael Liddy That would be the one yes.

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  30. @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    I think he’s pissed at Dumoulin for wearing the pink jersey with jeans. Not least, for wearing that oversized belt buckle…

    Oh god, I’m absolutely thrilled the oversized belt buckle trendy has died. I guess Tom was too busy on training rides to hear the news. I really thought those were some ugly as belts. (Also thrilled the deployment of cargo pants as “biz cas” has died, HATED seeing people in shirts and ties…with cargo pants. Eck!) And thank you for bring up denim, as I haven’t mentioned my No Denim Policy in too long. Don’t even own a pair, much less wear denim.

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  31. @Ron

    @frank

    @litvi

    @frank

    @KogaLover

    Speaking about Jan Janssen…

    Always so classy.

    And he still has the same glaring look! Is he just a deeply pensive guy in general, or do the ill-fitting clothes on everyone around him get on his last goddamn nerve?

    I think he’s pissed at Dumoulin for wearing the pink jersey with jeans. Not least, for wearing that oversized belt buckle…

    Oh god, I’m absolutely thrilled the oversized belt buckle trendy has died. I guess Tom was too busy on training rides to hear the news. I really thought those were some ugly as belts. (Also thrilled the deployment of cargo pants as “biz cas” has died, HATED seeing people in shirts and ties…with cargo pants. Eck!) And thank you for bring up denim, as I haven’t mentioned my No Denim Policy in too long. Don’t even own a pair, much less wear denim.

    I’m cool with jeans, but wear them less often as other options are available. Cargo pants or shorts? No fucking way. The devil’s garb. Just horrible. People wearing shirts and ties (that’s good, I have more ties than I can count and when appropriate wear them 3-4 times a week) but with cargo pants? Who raised these people FFS! That would be like wearing sneakers with a tux. Wrong, wrong, wrong. Speaking of ties, I have a thing right now for the straight blade knit tie. Just got a couple of cashmere beauties on sale from Saks. Everyone should have a black silk knit tie in their wardrobe.

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  32. I don’t know who raised them. I definitely live in a bubble on a daily basis, so when I go out in public these days I’m generally shocked at what people wear around town. It’s depressing. It seems, like with wealth and politics, we have two extreme ends. It’s either a dandy who looks to be model for the clothing company, far, far too done up for an average day OR it’s a guy in stained sweatpants with his slippers on. The world is a bizarre place these days.

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  33. @frank

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    And I’m sure each bike has a slightly different saddle position so Eddy could swap them during a race. You can’t always count on a French newspaper strike to give you time to stop and make adjustments, after all.

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  34. @Ron

    I don’t know who raised them. I definitely live in a bubble on a daily basis, so when I go out in public these days I’m generally shocked at what people wear around town. It’s depressing. It seems, like with wealth and politics, we have two extreme ends. It’s either a dandy who looks to be model for the clothing company, far, far too done up for an average day OR it’s a guy in stained sweatpants with his slippers on. The world is a bizarre place these days.

    My VMW has a saying when we pass some people, she mutters “Have you no mirrors in your house?”

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  35. @MangoDave

    @frank

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    And I’m sure each bike has a slightly different saddle position so Eddy could swap them during a race. You can’t always count on a French newspaper strike to give you time to stop and make adjustments, after all.

    Hold up. Did you just say “stop and make adjustments?” Bitch please.

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  36. @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    I watch that video and notice that the bikes all look the same. Compare with today so much difference. All the different bikes today are each much more distinctive. Consider a Super Six vs a Venge vs an F10 vs a Madone. All very differently designed and styled bikes in the Peloton today vs back in the skinny straight steel tube days.

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  37. @Randy C

    @frank

    @ErikdR

    @KogaLover Yes, yes, goodness yes – I’ll never forget that as long as I live. 1985. 38 years old (Not me; Joop. I was 27 at the time). Thirty-eight! A strong field including Greg LeMond, Moreno Argentin, Stephen Roche… Joop sneaking off on the left side of the road, out-foxing the lot of ’em – and Mart Smeets, the Dutch sports commentator, utterly losing his shit. Good times. (I must have been peeling a lot of onions at the time, because there was a very distinct trace of salty liquid in the corners of my eyes when Joop crossed the line that day…)

    Magic. Nah, lads. Let that orange jersey go up the road. That cat’s too old to be dangerous.

    I watch that video and notice that the bikes all look the same. Compare with today so much difference. All the different bikes today are each much more distinctive. Consider a Super Six vs a Venge vs an F10 vs a Madone. All very differently designed and styled bikes in the Peloton today vs back in the skinny straight steel tube days.

    They might look the same, but I’m pretty sure there was more variation across bikes in the peloton then. A 54 Venge, is a 54 Venge, is a 54 Venge – they’re all from the same mold. T’was much easier to customise geometry with tubes and lugs.

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  38. @Randy C I see what you mean, though. The bikes do vary in looks a lot more today. TT bikes aside, aero bikes, superlight climbing bikes, and endurance/cobble bikes (often ridden in the same race) look totally different from each other, and two examples of either of those categories can look very different. My point was that even on the same ‘brand’ (just decals, really), two riders from the same team, ostensibly riding the same model, might have quite different geometry in reality, back in the pre carbon day.

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  39. @litvi

    @MangoDave

    @frank

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    And I’m sure each bike has a slightly different saddle position so Eddy could swap them during a race. You can’t always count on a French newspaper strike to give you time to stop and make adjustments, after all.

    Hold up. Did you just say “stop and make adjustments?” Bitch please.

    “…but the delay can also be used for adjusting one’s saddle…” [Inserts crappy screenshot of A Sunday in Hell, 26 minutes in.]

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  40. @stooge

    @Randy C I see what you mean, though. The bikes do vary in looks a lot more today. TT bikes aside, aero bikes, superlight climbing bikes, and endurance/cobble bikes (often ridden in the same race) look totally different from each other, and two examples of either of those categories can look very different. My point was that even on the same ‘brand’ (just decals, really), two riders from the same team, ostensibly riding the same model, might have quite different geometry in reality, back in the pre carbon day.

    Not forgetting that “back in the day” or at least pre carbon, many of the top riders bikes were not what they seemed from the team colours and “manufacturer” logos but were actually artisan custom builds by the likes of Pegoretti. You could open spot them with different rear dropouts.

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  41. @stooge

    @Randy C I see what you mean, though. The bikes do vary in looks a lot more today. TT bikes aside, aero bikes, superlight climbing bikes, and endurance/cobble bikes (often ridden in the same race) look totally different from each other, and two examples of either of those categories can look very different. My point was that even on the same ‘brand’ (just decals, really), two riders from the same team, ostensibly riding the same model, might have quite different geometry in reality, back in the pre carbon day.

    Not forgetting that not only were they different geometry they were sometimes (often?) not the purported manufacturer bikes at all but rather made by the likes of Pegoretti. The rear dropouts were always a good id of a non manufacturer bike.

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  42. From ‘net “In the days of a steel and aluminium peloton, Pegoretti was the apprentice to world famous framebuilder Luigino Milani, who was a favoured contract builder for many of the pro teams. After his apprenticeship Pegoretti continued to build for the pros, with Indurain, Pantani and Cipollini all having ridden his frames.

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  43. @Ron

    I don’t know who raised them. I definitely live in a bubble on a daily basis, so when I go out in public these days I’m generally shocked at what people wear around town. It’s depressing. It seems, like with wealth and politics, we have two extreme ends. It’s either a dandy who looks to be model for the clothing company, far, far too done up for an average day OR it’s a guy in stained sweatpants with his slippers on. The world is a bizarre place these days.

    Run out of medication again?

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  44. @stooge

    @Randy C I see what you mean, though. The bikes do vary in looks a lot more today. TT bikes aside, aero bikes, superlight climbing bikes, and endurance/cobble bikes (often ridden in the same race) look totally different from each other, and two examples of either of those categories can look very different. My point was that even on the same ‘brand’ (just decals, really), two riders from the same team, ostensibly riding the same model, might have quite different geometry in reality, back in the pre carbon day.

    The geo question though today is not in the length of the frame tubes but dialed in with stem length, angle and saddle set back. So the geo variation for sure exists. Heck, probably more variation in different bars on 10 bikes today vs entire peloton back then. And wheels too eh ? And as @Teocalli points out that was a strange circumstance with frame builders building bikes and then the bike sponsor’s logo being on the bike. Hampsten’s Huffys built by Serotta. Armstrong on Trek Litespeeds. LeMond’s Lemonds were Calfee (?) Just wouldn’t see that kinda thing today. This is time of year I watch the inter webs for photos and news on next year’s new models. I just really dig the new bikes. See latest pic’s of new Tarmacs are showing up. Cheers

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  45. the new Tarmacs look like BMCs

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  46. or Canyons. or…

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  47. @stooge


    My point was that even on the same ‘brand’ (just decals, really), two riders from the same team, ostensibly riding the same model, might have quite different geometry in reality, back in the pre carbon day.

    Geometry on carbon bikes can be customized. Obviously, easier if the bike is tube to tube construction like the Colnago C60. Monocoque frames would require a different mold, which is a more expensive proposition. But for the “big name” manufacturers, an expense they might be willing to incur for a big name rider. And then there’s always Sarto, who reportedly has built custom frames for pro riders that replicate the manufacturer sponsor frame but are completely custom (geometry and layup) for the individual rider.

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  48. 1
  49. @Ron

    I don’t know who raised them. I definitely live in a bubble on a daily basis, so when I go out in public these days I’m generally shocked at what people wear around town. It’s depressing. It seems, like with wealth and politics, we have two extreme ends. It’s either a dandy who looks to be model for the clothing company, far, far too done up for an average day OR it’s a guy in stained sweatpants with his slippers on. The world is a bizarre place these days.

    I’m OK with anyone’s personal style choice, so long as they are taking pride in their appearance. It shows you have respect for yourself as well as those people whom you encounter during the day. The sweatpants and so forth is just disgraceful. The most insulting thing, to me, is the couples you see on the street where the girl looks pretty and put together and the guy she’s with is a total slob with his baseball cap on – probably backwards. Grown men in baseball caps…news flash! We know you’re bald(ing) because…you’re wearing a baseball cap! Go bald with dignity. (I’m speaking from observation, not experience. My hair is still FANTASTIC.) Seattle is interesting – you have the over-made dandies, the hipsters, the grungies, the business people, and the techies all mixed in. It really makes you appreciate people who take care in their appearance and stop being so stuck on your own personal style. I’ve seen some people pull off some rad shit that I would never in my right mind attempt.

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  50. @MangoDave

    @frank

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    And I’m sure each bike has a slightly different saddle position so Eddy could swap them during a race. You can’t always count on a French newspaper strike to give you time to stop and make adjustments, after all.

    +1 badge to you! (It’s been out of use for too long!) @litvi

    @MangoDave

    @frank

    I suspect they are all Eddy’s bikes – the lead photo clearly shows the other two bikes with blue tape.

    And I’m sure each bike has a slightly different saddle position so Eddy could swap them during a race. You can’t always count on a French newspaper strike to give you time to stop and make adjustments, after all.

    Hold up. Did you just say “stop and make adjustments?” Bitch please.

    Close second!

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