Imprecise Precision: L’Heure

Imprecise Precision: L’Heure

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Why would any sane person choose to suffer? The answer to this question is a primal one and of particular relevance to society in the current age: control. With chaos and uncertainty creeping from every corner of life, cycling provides us with control over physical suffering; to suffer at our own will provides us the control we viscerally crave. This control then provides us the courage to face uncertainty in life with the confidence that we can handle anything it can throw at us.

There is no challenge within Cycling which more comprehensively embodies this notion than The Hour Record, which represents the only event that pits the rider not against a course, but against Time itself; how far can the rider propel themselves in the span of sixty minutes while also suppressing their nausea as they turn left endlessly?

The cruelty is hard to grasp. As cyclists we suffer, but our suffering is normally proportional to it’s intensity – certainly it hurts to ride harder, but the harder we ride, the sooner the pain will subside. In the Hour, the duration of the suffering is uniform: the effort will last 60 minutes and no amount of increased suffering will shorten it, unless, of course, you believe Al Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity, which states that for a body moving at speed, time moves relatively slower than it does for a body at rest. According to Al, then, the rider will experience a marginally reduced Hour measured not by a clock moving with the rider, but by a clock sitting at rest at the side of the track. (While this amount of time is mathematically negligible, it does explain why intervals on the trainer feel comparatively more interminable than intervals on the road.)

Eddy Merckx himself made the following observation after setting the benchmark effort of 49,431 meters in 1972:

The pain was very, very, very significant. There is no comparison with a time trial. There you can change gear, change your cadence, relax even if it is only for a few instants’ respite. The Hour is a permanent, total, intense effort, which can’t be compared to anything else.1

Knowing that the Prophet‘s bunkmate was The Man With the Hammer, the triple use of the word “very” is somewhat panic-inducing.

In recent years, the Hour Record has sadly seen a decline in interest, with the last attempt by world-class rider having been made by Chris Boardman in 2000. Boardman was at the center of the Hour’s Golden Era in the early Nineties which saw Graeme Obree kick off a frenzy of attempts to raise it ever higher by first breaking the record in his innovative tuck position as an amateur in 1993. Boardman broke it a few months later, before Obree reclaimed it in his even-more radical Super-Man position. This was a period where Boardman, Obree, Miguel Indurain, and Tony Rominger all traded the record for the better part of a decade, each going ever-farther in evermore innovative riding positions.

The UCI put a halt to the interest in this record by establishing two records, the (Athlete’s) Hour Record and The Best Human Effort. The Hour restricts the equipment to that of a standard double-triangle frame with drop bars, while the Best Human Effort has no such restriction. While the intent was to establish a more equal judgement of the athlete instead of the focus on equipment, it misses the point that advancement, evolution, and innovation are all basic elements of what it means to be Human, and by eliminating these elements from The Hour, they eliminated the appeal in what is our sport’s most primal effort. After all, there were few riders willing to go head to head with Merckx in his time, and so there are few who are willing to do so today.

Chris Boardman stands apart in this regard and indeed went after the new record, which he broke by a whopping 10 meters3. Over the course of his career, he set the record three times, which makes him possibly both the toughest and slowest-learning human currently living; even Merckx declared he would never attempt the Hour a second time, despite having fallen short of his personal goal of 50,000 meters. Boardman describes the Hour in simple, physiological terms: with every push of the pedals, you break down the fibers in your muscles such that for each subsequent revolution, you have a little less functional muscle mass available to sustain your current speed and power through to the end. In a word, devastation. It is not the sort of thing one attempts more than one needs to.

To gauge an effort of this type is perhaps the most pure description of The V; you ride not as hard as you know you can, but as hard as you hope you might. Boardman, on the Hour Record:

You have three questions going through your mind:

How far to go?

How hard am I trying?

Is the pace sustainable for that distance?

If the answer is “yes”, that means you’re not trying hard enough. If it’s no, it’s too late to do anything about it. You’re looking for the answer “maybe”.2

Despite all the training, preparation, and technical advancement that goes into any attempt on l’Heure, it remains a matter of the Human element, one of imprecise precision.

1,2 These quotes are taken from William Fotheringham‘s biography of Eddy Merckx, Merckx, Half Man, Half Bike.
3 It has been broken since by other, lower-profile riders since.

// Folklore // Nostalgia // Technology // The Hardmen // Tradition

  1. @xyxax

    @RedRanger
    Even to celebrate Merckxmas? Maybe at V a.m. when it’s only 35. Maybe not.
    But my infrequent visits are always in winter. I do see a mini-Cogal in our future. The girls need to see their Auntie, hmmmm…..

    I’m down for a winter mini cogal if your in town.

  2. (While this amount of time is mathematically negligible, it does explain why intervals on the trainer feel comparatively more interminable than intervals on the road.)

    An epiphany! I always knew you were a smart bastard.

  3. @VeloVita

    @frank

    @Nate

    The point about the will and the other one about the UCI remind me of the extended riff on the hour in the Rider, and the insanity it induces, such as the guy who had a dot of light projected in front of him as a pacing mechanism in an effort to take his own will out of the equation, and the time Oskar Egg measured the track on his hands and knees to prove that a competing rider for the record didn’t ride as far as claimed.

    Its a good point, except that once you go down that road, you start to really thin the herd, which is good and bad. Once a block named Eddy Merckx pisses on his corner, you know there aren’t going to be a lot of guys willing to go head-to-head with him.

    The evolution of the bike and position is what made this record interesting. We all already know Eddy was the best and no Hour Record or Tour de France record will change that for anyone who looks at the context around those. That is a done deal. Eddy was the most complete rider we’ll ever have. Its over. The chapter is closed. Why fuck around with the Hour Record then? The Hour is about seeing how far you can go in an hour, and the evolution is what made that interesting.

    Personally, I feel the UCI really missed the mark there. I understand the motive and I respect and even appreciate it – make it about the rider. Its poetic and beautiful, but we already have the anser. Might as well ask @ChrisO to compile an analysis of why the others won’t ever match up to him.

    The Hour was interesting because it gave people a chance to poke the badger and see if they could top Eddy’s number when they gave themselves a massive handicap.

    If I had access to Boardman and could ask him, I bet he’d agree with me on that. Chris is one of my biggest heros, btw. Right with Obree, they demonstrate the Hour’s equivalent of Musueew or Boonen. Modern marvels.

    You’d appreciate the interview Jack Thurston did with Mike Burrows a month or so back on The Bike Show Podcast. Burrows agrees and that is why his focus is entirely on HPVs (human powered vehicles, not STDs) now. He even goes so far as to suggest that pro racing would be more interesting if the UCI allowed HPVs (in the form of faired recumbents or whatnot) in prologues and time trials. I wouldn’t be for that, but I suppose its an interesting concept, though it would start to make cycling more like F1.

    I would suggest that if the UCI allowed HPV’s or had a ‘anything goes’ attitude toward the TT’s it would ruin the sport. Getting past the fact that we’d end up seeing quasi-bikes that would be fugly, ultimately only the teams with huge budgets could afford to spend the money on R&D to build the winning machines. IMHO, reeling in, and defining TT bikes was one of a few things that the UCI has done right. Can you imagine seeing Spartacus doing the prologue on a fully fairing equipped recumbent? I’d nip off and kill myself.

  4. @minion

    @Dan_R
    A kilo is one of the three things every cyclist should do, purely for the actual, legitimate feeling of going backwards on a bike – you get over the gear the first lap, sprint the second lap, and hang on for the rest. The last 200 metres is the longest I’ve ever experienced. I can’t quite decide what else should be in there, but that’s definitely one of them. An hour will be about the stupidest thing I can think of doing on a bike, so of course I want to do it.

    After we warmed up on the track for a bit in Belgium, Alex rolled up next to me and said, “Woof. This is good for the heart.”

    Truer words were never spoken. And, I have to say, when we did our little pursuit, it was fucking brutal. Trackies are fat, but my goodness my guiness, they can hurt themselves.

  5. @pistard

    @frank
    Re: track protocol. Most velodromes will require you to take a basic track class or workshop, then buy a membership or pay drop-in fees to ride and have a license to race. Most have regular “open track” hours between races/classes, but I assume you would want an empty track for fewer distractions?

    Dromes are generally non-profit and underfunded. They might be amenable to a rental or donation, or maybe you could set it up as a fundraiser. Online parimutuel betting anyone?

    Thanks for the tip; that’s what I’d understood but I’m not able to get in touch with the folks there…they might make me go over there and talk to them in person, but my passport to the East Side has expired and I’m loathe to update it just to find out what the protocol is.

    I can’t believe its June already, by the way.

  6. @Cyclops

    (While this amount of time is mathematically negligible, it does explain why intervals on the trainer feel comparatively more interminable than intervals on the road.)

    An epiphany! I always knew you were a smart bastard.

    I’ve been waiting for someone to notice that. I expected to have some brainiac point out that I might have been wrong, but I’m pleased the first reference is to call me smart. Feels good. Doesn’t happen often. Usually its more along the “you stupid fuck” lines.

  7. @scaler911

    @VeloVita

    @frank

    @Nate

    The point about the will and the other one about the UCI remind me of the extended riff on the hour in the Rider, and the insanity it induces, such as the guy who had a dot of light projected in front of him as a pacing mechanism in an effort to take his own will out of the equation, and the time Oskar Egg measured the track on his hands and knees to prove that a competing rider for the record didn’t ride as far as claimed.

    Its a good point, except that once you go down that road, you start to really thin the herd, which is good and bad. Once a block named Eddy Merckx pisses on his corner, you know there aren’t going to be a lot of guys willing to go head-to-head with him.

    The evolution of the bike and position is what made this record interesting. We all already know Eddy was the best and no Hour Record or Tour de France record will change that for anyone who looks at the context around those. That is a done deal. Eddy was the most complete rider we’ll ever have. Its over. The chapter is closed. Why fuck around with the Hour Record then? The Hour is about seeing how far you can go in an hour, and the evolution is what made that interesting.

    Personally, I feel the UCI really missed the mark there. I understand the motive and I respect and even appreciate it – make it about the rider. Its poetic and beautiful, but we already have the anser. Might as well ask @ChrisO to compile an analysis of why the others won’t ever match up to him.

    The Hour was interesting because it gave people a chance to poke the badger and see if they could top Eddy’s number when they gave themselves a massive handicap.

    If I had access to Boardman and could ask him, I bet he’d agree with me on that. Chris is one of my biggest heros, btw. Right with Obree, they demonstrate the Hour’s equivalent of Musueew or Boonen. Modern marvels.

    You’d appreciate the interview Jack Thurston did with Mike Burrows a month or so back on The Bike Show Podcast. Burrows agrees and that is why his focus is entirely on HPVs (human powered vehicles, not STDs) now. He even goes so far as to suggest that pro racing would be more interesting if the UCI allowed HPVs (in the form of faired recumbents or whatnot) in prologues and time trials. I wouldn’t be for that, but I suppose its an interesting concept, though it would start to make cycling more like F1.

    I would suggest that if the UCI allowed HPV’s or had a ‘anything goes’ attitude toward the TT’s it would ruin the sport. Getting past the fact that we’d end up seeing quasi-bikes that would be fugly, ultimately only the teams with huge budgets could afford to spend the money on R&D to build the winning machines. IMHO, reeling in, and defining TT bikes was one of a few things that the UCI has done right. Can you imagine seeing Spartacus doing the prologue on a fully fairing equipped recumbent? I’d nip off and kill myself.

    Good point. There is a line, though, somewhere between the two.

    Completely badass.

    Not so much.

  8. Oh, shit.

  9. RESET RESET.

    Boardman just has a beautiful position on a bike – any bike. Amazing.

  10. @eightzero

    @Gianni

    @Steampunk

    @Gianni
    Um, Spartacus was a gladiator, not a centurion. The sandals might have been similar, though (but they sure as fuck weren’t Adilettes).

    Ahhhh, FFS! Bloody Romans, what have they done for us? Yes, I stand corrected.

    Don’t forget the reimagined scene: http://lunarpoodle.blogspot.com/2011/03/life-of-velominati.html

    How did I miss this? Genius, I say, genius! I love that scene to death.

  11. @RedRanger

    @mcsqueak

    @RedRanger

    Have you done that climb before? Looks like an ass-kicker.

    Unfortunately not. one day though.

    The Missus and I have done it a few times, it’s a perfect climb except for lack of water available on the way up. Amazing views as one rises above the desert. I believe it ends up around 8k’, There is a little village for refueling and the descent is too fun. It’s the sort where you can go for miles without touching the brakes, warm dry air. Hmmmmm. perfect. I nearly collided with a huge vulture on the descent, it was lifting off some road kill as I went by at 80kph, damn close intersection of flight paths.

  12. @Gianni
    It’s a very non technical decent that’s for sure. Summer Haven is the name of that Village. And yeah if you are going to be taking a while water would be a major issue since there is nothing between Tucson and the top.

  13. @frank

    @pistard

    @frank
    Re: track protocol. Most velodromes will require you to take a basic track class or workshop, then buy a membership or pay drop-in fees to ride and have a license to race. Most have regular “open track” hours between races/classes, but I assume you would want an empty track for fewer distractions?

    Dromes are generally non-profit and underfunded. They might be amenable to a rental or donation, or maybe you could set it up as a fundraiser. Online parimutuel betting anyone?

    Thanks for the tip; that’s what I’d understood but I’m not able to get in touch with the folks there…they might make me go over there and talk to them in person, but my passport to the East Side has expired and I’m loathe to update it just to find out what the protocol is.

    I can’t believe its June already, by the way.

    (206) 957-4555 is listed as the Velodrome Association # but it may just be a board member’s contact. Also (425) 998-7225, but that might be the facility/municipality.

  14. @scaler911

    @jonathan2263

    How steep is Alpenrose? When the Vandedrome was set up in NJ, I got to race on that. I believe it was 53 degrees and 170 meters around. It felt like riding in a goldfish bowl, you were just about constantly in a turn. And the ends were so steep that if you weren’t in the stayers lane going into the turn you were actually going uphill and had to accelerate to get into the turn. Wild, fun stuff.

    WOW! Alpenrose is 268.43 meters around with a 16.6 meter radius and a 43 degree bank. I don’t remember exactly, but I think you have to be going 14-16MPH (sorry) to not fall to the apron on the banks. It’s really disconcerting the first few times around, especially combined with a bike you can’t coast on.

    20km or you’ll slide down the wall. Best thing to do is ride the fence and look down, it’s awesome.

  15. @frank

    Oh, shit.

    Slap a Cervelo sticker on it and see who buys it.

  16. @minion

    @scaler911

    @jonathan2263

    How steep is Alpenrose? When the Vandedrome was set up in NJ, I got to race on that. I believe it was 53 degrees and 170 meters around. It felt like riding in a goldfish bowl, you were just about constantly in a turn. And the ends were so steep that if you weren’t in the stayers lane going into the turn you were actually going uphill and had to accelerate to get into the turn. Wild, fun stuff.

    WOW! Alpenrose is 268.43 meters around with a 16.6 meter radius and a 43 degree bank. I don’t remember exactly, but I think you have to be going 14-16MPH (sorry) to not fall to the apron on the banks. It’s really disconcerting the first few times around, especially combined with a bike you can’t coast on.

    20km or you’ll slide down the wall. Best thing to do is ride the fence and look down, it’s awesome.

    No doubt. Heights don’t scare me, (my other passion is rock and ice climbing), but as they say, no one gets hurt or dies falling, it’s the sudden stop.

  17. I too, would live to see a Cancellara have a go at th hour. But you people have overlooked the reason that there have been no recent attempts. And it is the same reason behind every decision of a pro to ride or not to ride. There must not be enough money in it!

    If only some sponsor would put up a bounty of say a million bucks to get the record. That would be cool – and might see some broader interest raised in the sport. Just think of it “in one hour from now Faboo could be $1 million richer”…

    Or probably a lot less in the impoverished world of cycling sponsorship.

  18. @Marcus
    With sport thesedays it’s more and more about bums on sofas than bums on seats, 1 hour of a single guy going round and round a velodrome would be hard to sell to the TV people.

    Still, give Red Bull a call. They seem to have sponsorship money to burn. If there was decent cash prize on offer it would definitely spice things up a bit.

    Also I think that the way cyclists earned their money may have changed a bit. Everything I’ve read about the previous generations of cyclists emphasised how important post season ‘exhibition’ style races were a big part of a pro’s income whereas that doesn’t seem to be the case now.

  19. @Marcus
    True enough, though I think there’s another element to it that hasn’t been covered; the guy who holds the record currently has tested positive for drugs a few times, the record is also sullied. So a rider has to not only beat the credible marks by Merckx and Boardman (essentially the same mark) and a higher discredited one set by a doper.

    Faboo is our only hope, so everyone start petitioning Red Bull and 5-Hour Energy to sponsor a worthy prize. Make the prize a couple mil and the rider can boast to have the highest hourly wage in sport.
    @napolinige

    Everything I’ve read about the previous generations of cyclists emphasised how important post season ‘exhibition’ style races were a big part of a pro’s income whereas that doesn’t seem to be the case now.

    I think that has been more true in the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s than it has been since the sport started modernizing in the 90’s. But to have a guy spin in a loop and see if he gets dizzy in an hour does leave something to be desired from a spectator sport perspective.

    They can publish the schedule, and turn the even into a lap-by-lap nail-biter to liven it up, but thats about all there is on that one. Great point.

  20. @minion
    Oh I love to ride the rail! It can fuck with the other guy’s head to because he is wondering, “is this dip-shit asking me to ride him into the rail?” Yes. Yes I am. Because as you roll into me out come the elbows….

  21. @frank
    I think a promoter would do best is the attempt was the highlight of an overall festival/match. Spread some money around for a madison and some match sprints with the highlight of the day being an hour attempt. Make it an invitational and have Faboo start on one side of the ‘drome with another invited rider on the other a la pursuit. And Scorpions playing on the loud speaker.

  22. @frank
    Shame you missed this, I know you’d promised the VMH no new bikes for your hour attempt for the Festum Prophetae but it’s not really new is it?

  23. @Dan_R

    @frank
    And Scorpions playing on the loud speaker.

    Uli Jon or modern Scorpions? I’m thinking Speedy’s Coming. Catch a Train would be cool too.

  24. @Dan_R
    I love the tactics of match sprinting. I got sweaty palms and increased heart rate just reading that.

  25. @frank
    Dont forget Eddy went poz too.

    Maybe it could be Luke Durbridge who takes the Hour? You didn’t think I would let his prologue win go by without some overly-patriotic insanity?

  26. @frank

    RESET RESET.

    Boardman just has a beautiful position on a bike – any bike. Amazing.

    For the Record (hurhur) i have actually ridden the Lotus bike Boardman is on in the top photo. My god it is low, unstable and fast and my back nearly died after about 2 minutes. Mental. But then i have not the souplesse that fella had. Or talent.

    Alongside meeting Bartoli, that is the sum total of my cycling fanboy-dom. Not bad i guess, but i have not ridden with the Lion of Flanders so i remain humbly in your velominashadows.

  27. @Zoncolan
    I love how in the top Boardman photo, it looks like smoke coming off the back wheel…

  28. @mouse

    @Zoncolan
    I love how in the top Boardman photo, it looks like smoke coming off the back wheel…

    It was probably snagging the frame after my Too Fat To Climb physique had stress tested the “vertical compliance”…

  29. @scaler911
    That was my point about it being more like Formula 1 in that only the teams with the budgets to either develop or pay for the most cutting edge tech would rule the roost. I too agree that it would ruin the sport if that were to happen – not to mention how aesthetically displeasing it would be.

  30. @frank

    Oh, shit.

    Aside from looking like a ‘shop job, I’d love to see this in motion.

  31. @Chris

    @frank
    Shame you missed this, I know you’d promised the VMH no new bikes for your hour attempt for the Festum Prophetae but it’s not really new is it?

    That’s it, isn’t it? Beautiful. Cozy enough price.

  32. @Marcus

    Maybe it could be Luke Durbridge who takes the Hour? You didn’t think I would let his prologue win go by without some overly-patriotic insanity?

    And Cadel won the stage today. Three…two…one…Marcus’s’s’s’s’ brain melts.

  33. @Zoncolan

    For the Record (hurhur) i have actually ridden the Lotus bike Boardman is on in the top photo. My god it is low, unstable and fast and my back nearly died after about 2 minutes. Mental. But then i have not the souplesse that fella had. Or talent.

    Alongside meeting Bartoli, that is the sum total of my cycling fanboy-dom. Not bad i guess, but i have not ridden with the Lion of Flanders so i remain humbly in your velominashadows.

    I reckon a bike like that needs to be moving at a good gallop before it stabilizes. That front wheel won’t have much stabilizing effect until you’re haulin.

    You can meet Museeuw on next year’s Keeper’s Tour. Schedule is shaking up to have more than one ride with him. Apparently he didn’t hate us enough to black list us.

  34. @VeloVita

    @scaler911
    That was my point about it being more like Formula 1 in that only the teams with the budgets to either develop or pay for the most cutting edge tech would rule the roost. I too agree that it would ruin the sport if that were to happen – not to mention how aesthetically displeasing it would be.

    The teams with the biggest budgets already rule the roost. Get the best gear, the best drugs, the best doctors, the best alien DNA…

  35. @Xyverz
    And it’s a gravel bike. Awesome. I hate to think of the chain slap though.

  36. Frank – yeah, where the hell did May go?! I blame the Giro. I’m way behind schedule on a lot of things…and 6/17 is getting closer by the minute!

    Biggest budgets, big teams, eh? Word of Leeky and Saxo merging. Eck.

  37. @Ron

    Frank – yeah, where the hell did May go?! I blame the Giro. I’m way behind schedule on a lot of things…and 6/17 is getting closer by the minute!

    Biggest budgets, big teams, eh? Word of Leeky and Saxo merging. Eck.

    Really? Where did you see that? I hope that we’re not going have 3-4 (if that) super teams, and a bunch of low budget stuff.
    But then, some of the smaller teams have been having a good go this year. Maybe it doesn’t matter.

  38. @scaler911
    Here is the rumor from cyclingnews.com

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/liquigas-and-saxo-bank-to-merge-in-2013

  39. @scaler911
    I know what you meam but Saxo isn’t much without Clenbutador.

  40. I saw the bike in the main picture earlier in the year on a visit to the Velodrome in Manchester. It’s simplicity is stunning, and a real throw back to an earlier era. It just shouts ‘Steel is Real’!

    To me isolating the man from the machine is what makes the hour record so pure in it’s current form.

    Having said that though I can see the argument for innovation as well, and in other sports find myself arguing against technical restrictions. Maybe I’m just a hypocrit?

  41. 936adl – Did the steed still sport the white tyres? They’d better lock it up or the local fixsters are gonna steal them right off the rims to match their white bike!

    Saw a fully white “track bike” this weekend locked up at a local bar. Nothing says “I ride fuckin’ heaps” like…no bar tape and no plugs.

  42. After my first running track session, I have to say a Runner’s Hour Record would be so much more painful. 10x800m repeats made me question my sanity, wondering what I did wrong to bring this on myself. I can’t imagine suffering an hour of this, alone, without the breaks in tempo.

  43. @tessar

    After my first running track session, I have to say a Runner’s Hour Record would be so much more painful. 10x800m repeats made me question my sanity, wondering what I did wrong to bring this on myself. I can’t imagine suffering an hour of this, alone, without the breaks in tempo.

    did you say…running track?? maybe i mis-read that being the Cognoscenti that I am, there is a synaptic disconnect between my ‘running’ and cycling neurons

    and, there isn’t anything more painful than the Hour Record…period..end of story, when Eddy said in essence, you must be either fu**ing nuts to try it for real and in a real attempt to break the record, or you must have seriously passed a full psychological fitness exam prior, YOU KNOW ITS TOUGH

  44. @936adl

    I saw the bike in the main picture earlier in the year on a visit to the Velodrome in Manchester. It’s simplicity is stunning, and a real throw back to an earlier era. It just shouts ‘Steel is Real’!

    To me isolating the man from the machine is what makes the hour record so pure in it’s current form.

    Having said that though I can see the argument for innovation as well, and in other sports find myself arguing against technical restrictions. Maybe I’m just a hypocrit?

    No, maybe you just understand exactly why Cycling is so cool! Its all very complex. I agree the simplicity and purity is beautiful, but its not worth much if it means no one goes after the record.

    *Shudder* the Red Bull competition seems the most viable way to kick up some interest again!

  45. @Ron
    Yup, it seems it does. Fixters – good one.

    @936adl
    I thought it was hanging in a local cafe? But its in the Manchester track, eh? Very cool. The pic above definitely makes it look like its at the track.

  46. @frank

    I love that they bothered to make the bike match the photo – it looks to be almost popping right out. Very nice.

  47. From the Boston Globe: “100-year-old cyclist Robert Marchand of France gets on his bike to set a world record for cycling non-stop for one hour at the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) velodrome in Aigle, Switzerland on February 17, 2012. Marchand, born November 26, 1911, cycled 24.251 km (15 miles) around the 200 meter indoor track to set the record.”

    Bloody brilliant!

  48. There’s an interesting discussion of the hour record in the recently published “Eddy Merckx: Half Man, Half Bike”. Boardman’s coach for the hour reckons Merckx did it all wrong by going off way too fast (1’09” kilos), which resulted in penultimate 10 mins being too slow. Says he would have pulled him in after 5 mins, got him to calm down and then sent him back out again to aim for a slower, more sustainable pace (1’111″ kilos). Also makes the point that the “athletes record” bit is a bit of bollocks – really just meant technology was stopped arbitrarily in early 1970’s. Why not go back to 1940s or 1900s? Merckx’s bike was high tech for its day.

  49. Today is the 40th anniversary of Merckx’s Mexico City Hour Record.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddy_Merckx#Hour_record.

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    As well as Mrs. Grady Driskell regarding Albany; counterparts, Linda Ellis, Betty Brown each Louisville, Ky.; other relatives, Shirley Sanders, Dorothy Rahman of Mpls, Minn; and various other relatives and friends. Hatcher Parents Memorial Property Ould – M. Your Diving Moose Cabaret Steakhouse (at Nine Azines. Martin Luther California king Jr .. Blvd.) can web host no more the planet NYE Party, such as a Private room complimentary wide open bar and also hors of 10pm night time.

    I giggled out loud while i check this out. My spouse and i been in Hirshberg shoes or boots repeatedly helping as well as helping my partner through months regarding preparing, waiting around from the mobile phone to know what sort of meeting proceeded to go and after that studying that merely did it not necessarily get because organized, nevertheless practically mentioned being an afterthought that my better half and his company spouse decided to take another finish. Even though these problems create my heart sink into meters abdomen, he or she seems largely undisturbed.
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    The road is home to several galleries and museums inside east houses, popular for their buildings around their own exhibits. Museo p Casa Murillo past residence regarding Pedrolati Domingo Murillo, one of several martyrs with the L . a . Paz Self-sufficiency movement of Come july 1st 07, 1809 functions works of art, furniture and clothing from an era whenever Los angeles Paz ended up being torn involving commitment on the Spanish language viceroy and assistance for indigenous protection under the law. With the Museo p Instrumentos Musicales, another school and meeting area for ambitious musicians, visitors planning to come across any preserves period associated with charango players or perhaps skillet flutists.
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    The Money ranking stops working a number of metropolis figures. One of the figures newspaper staffers done crunches have been typical earnings ($96,930), auto insurance rates ($1,532 common price quote with regard to condition), job development (46.90 per cent from 2000 Last year) and also median house price ($260,1000). Additionally, it factored in usage of leisure time actions, for example the quantity of eating places (Three,016 ), concert halls (Thirty-one ) and public collections (Sixty-five) inside of 16 kilometers, galleries and museums (more effective) along with community courses (125) within Thirty kilometers, as well as snowboarding hotels (Fifteen) within just 100 mls..
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