La Vie Velominatus: The Toolkit

La Vie Velominatus: The Toolkit

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Even as a Pre-Cambrian Velominatus, the rusty wires in my brain must have made the connection between my machine’s aesthetics and the lack of a saddle bag; I can’t remember a time when I rode with a European Posterior Man Satchel. But riding without a saddle bag means the tools go in the pocket, and that means great care must be take in their selection; it has taken the better part of 30 years for my toolkit to evolve to the point where it is today: a minimalist set of highly reliable tools, each carefully selected for its function, form, and weight.

In addition to the endless cycle of tools that have come in and out of the kit, their locations have changed over the years. I’ve spread them across all three pockets, careful to distribute the weight evenly. I’ve put the heaviest items in the center pocket and kept the lighter ones in the side pockets. I’ve put all the weight in the side pockets and kept the center pocket free for stuffing with other items. I’ve ridden with minipump, with CO2, with minipump and C02. I’ve strapped the pump to my seatpost (we can’t all be genius all the time). I’ve carried two multi-tools, I’ve carried loose allen keys. I’ve carried chain tools. I’ve carried multi-tools with integrated chain tools. Suffice to say, nearly every conceivable permutation has been tried.

Before I go on, I want to make a point very clear: here we are wandering deep into Velominatus territory. Every item has been selected for a function, but that function is presupposed by the notion that our bicycles are meticulously cared for and we do not expect to make major roadside repairs. Punctures, silencing a creak or rattle, making a minor shifting adjustment, straightening a handlebar, or tweaking a saddle are the types of repairs within the scope of what may be expected mid-ride. Broken chains, snapped cables, broken spokes, handlebars, or saddles are failures that are to be preempted before departure and if they happen during a ride, one is expected to limp home or find alternative means of transportation. If going on a longer ride with no bail-out, one is to adjust their kit accordingly to account for self-reliance.

I also realize that I’ve now jinxed myself for tomorrow’s Cogal. (But I said it ironically, so I think I’m safe.)

The following considerations factor into my kit selection (in no particular order):

  1. I used to carry two (or more) spare tubes, several Co2 canisters, and a mini pump. I’m not sure exactly how many punctures I was expecting to have during my rides, but I am sure I was prepared for them. That fact that I rarely flat never figured heavily in my planning.
  2. Patch kits have gone from being big clunky things complete with a tube of glue that smelled alarmingly good when opened, to small things you’re more likely to lose than to notice you’re carrying it.
  3. Minipumps have become very small and very light, while still providing enough pressure to get you home.
  4. C02 chucks have gotten small and light, and are reasonably inexpensive.
  5. C02 canisters are similarly inexpensive, and based on how frequently I use them, do not seem an unreasonable investment.
  6. Loose allen keys are ungainly and can be lost; a screwdriver even more so.
  7. Most of the critical bolts on a bicycle take either a 4mm or 5mm allen key; a screwdriver head is similarly critical as sometimes a derailleur stop needs to be changed. 3mm or 6mm keys are rarely required.
  8.  Tools are heavy, and the aggregate weight of the toolkit can be significant. Take care to find lightweight, compact tools (that still function well) and you can dramatically reduce the weight you carry with you.
  9. Latex tubes are significantly lighter and more compact that standard tubes.
  10. iPhones are wicked rad, but Steve Jobs was clearly not a cyclist. Those things weigh like tanks.

Nirvana is a state we cannot hope to reach, though La Vie Velominatus may carry us to its outer boundaries. That is where I feel I am today when it comes to my tool kit, the contents of which are the Lezyne V5 Multitool, Lezyne Trigger DriveLezyne Smark Kit, two Lezyne Alloy Levers, two 12g Co2 cartridges, my phone, cash, ID, and inhaler (like most Pros, I’m asthmatic). I organize my kit into separate small plastic bags, but do not store the lot in a Rule #31 Sack, like many of my esteemed peers. Instead, I opt to keep things stored separately in my center jersey pocket, such that I am able to pull items such as my phone or multitool out of my pocket (while riding) without needing to remove everything else with it.

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// Accessories and Gear // La Vie Velominatus // Look Pro // Reverence // Tradition

  1. @brett

    Your mate’s setup does look class.

    That looks like a first generation Max Flite?

  2. Always go riding with someone else who insists on taking their entire tool kit, use those bike bitches for their purpose.

    Sticking most of it in a bidon works for me. Not great in the height of summer but I its not something I need to worry about much as I live in England and anyway, clear piss is so over rated, the brighter the better.

  3. @bigbailey

    Always go riding with someone else who insists on taking their entire tool kit, use those bike bitches for their purpose.

    Thank you! I have always wondered what to call those special friends.

  4. @Clips and Straps

    Carry the weight on the bike – not on you.
    When dancing on the pedals uphill do you really want to be lifting that weight up and down every pedal rev ? So Anquetil put his bidon in his jersey pocket at the bottom of a hill. Just Jacque’s way of unsettling his opponents. He carried out mind games all the time.
    Also the damage you can do to yourself if you fall off and all those angular bits of metal get pushed into your soft body. Ouch ! You really will be suffering for your art.
    Nothing wrong with a small under seat pack to carry your stuff.

    If you’re doing it right, dancing on the pedals allows the bike to move more than the rider. Always keep your upper body still: moving your torso is the worst thing you can do and its weight is negligibly added to by adding lightweight tools.

    @chiasticon

    i view use of EPMS vs jersey-packing the same way i do use of co2/pump; it just depends on what the ride/conditions dictate. certainly it’s preferable to go sans-EPMS (the bike looks and feels better), but while trying to employ that approach, the one thing i absolutely DON’T want EVER is to look like this:

    (ugh, it;s like a stuffed pita pocket.) so if i need the pockets for something other than the everyday ride essentials, i’ll employ the EPMS. to at least distribute some of the weight/cargo.
    similarly with co2, i prefer to go with whatever’s lightest but also most appropriate for the ride. two co2 carts plus nozzle outweighs my topeak racerocket hp. so if i’ll need at least two, the pump goes. but if it’s a group ride and i want to hold everyone up as little as possible, i’ll bring co2.
    also, first post. hello!

    Welcome! All good points, but that photo of overstuffed pockets is at least as bad as those of overstuff saddlebags swaying in the wind. But an overstuffed jersey like that is an awful thing. Bottom line: if the pockets are that full, you’re carrying too much. We’re not off to a picnic, we’re out riding our bikes.

  5. @Oli

    @Calmante

    It’s a ‘Flite 1990′, apparently a re-issue of the original.

  6. @RedRanger

    The point is to be selective of what you take with you. But things that are light weight.

    This.

    @Blah

    @chubster

    @frank
    dunno guys, style pts are nice but they probably should go lower on the list.

    Hmmm… Do you even know which site you’re posting on?

    A PLUS FUCKING ONE.

    @Calmante

    @frank
    That is a Michelin tube wrapped in a Pokemon bracelet. A colleague’s little girl gave it to me as a present one day, and it fit perfectly, so there ya go. That and… Yeah, whatever, so I play Pokemon games on my Nintendo 3DS occasionally. I refuse to let go of my childhood.

    Neither do I – that’s why we have a thread this long about toolkits!

  7. @lifeaftergeorge
    Welcome, and strong argument. Unfortunately you’re wrong.

    There is always the misperception that The Rules are about Looking Pro when in fact the Rules governing these types of issues are about Looking Fantastic. Hopefully there’s a large intersection in the two sets, but they are independent sets. Have a look at the Pro bunch out training and you’ll see what I mean. We’re also not chucking a Rule up telling people to dress like a bandit.

    As for your “photo” of Big George: It’s clearly an impostor. No overshoes. And that’s one enormous fucking saddle bag. The tools you mention could easily tuck into the bottom of the impostors jersey pocket and no one would be the wiser – and that bike wouldn’t have a growth on it!

  8. @Blah
    Espresso on the screen. +1 badge to you, my man!

  9. @doubleR

    Judging by the responses, it appears that a serious insurrection is underway against our beloved, esteemed Founder and Keeper. Can you say “heresy?”

    All sins are punished in time. Next time you’re out riding the Man with the Hammer pays a visit, you’ll all know why.

  10. @paolo

    @Blah
    If you get a tiny Leyzene pack or a fi'zi:k clip on it doesn’t move. Indeed the Lezyne mini can barely been seen when the rider is mounted.

    The fi'zi:k clipons will unclip. Beware.@scaler911

    So tell me clowns that are “dissenting” on Rule #31; How do you keep your shit dry in your EPMS in the rain? Pray tell you’re not using fenders. Nothing quite as fun as getting a wet tube into a wet tire with a flat. At least when the tubes dry, and the inside of the tire is mostly dry, the change goes fast. Which is important when it’s 3C and pouring rain out and your fingers don’t work. I quit using a ‘saddle bag’ in ’92. If you’re clever, you don’t really need to take much anyway; 3 pockets and I can get all my schizzle in one. Leaves me two for storage and gels etc.
    To the “you don’t want to land on it during a crash” crowd, that should be the least of your worries. By the time the your helmet has cracked, and your collar bone has broken most of the force of impact is done. It’d be amazingly rare for you to land full force on the small of your back which is concave anyway. 22 years in ER/ OR, 20 years training/ racing never seen that injury.
    Just my humble opinion of course.

    Amen, brother. Amen. Our ride saturday was 4-5 hours, big hills, big change in weather/temperature, kit going in and out of the pockets with food, no issue.

    Always remember to fold your jackets and gilets flat and tuck them under the jersey. Much mo’ betta than in the pockets.

  11. @scaler911, @Oli, @Blah, @Buck Rogers

    @Buck Rogers

    @Blah

    @Oli

    So, we’re all agreed? The consensus is that we either use an EPMS or/and our pockets, as we see fit and depending on our unique needs.

    ‘Agreed’ from me, sure. As long as we all agree that they look shite on the bike, of course.

    Jesus FUCKIN’ Christ! Pere Fronk goes away for a day and everyone goes bloody bananas.
    You all need to re-read Rule #2, Rule #3 and Rule #29. What else is there to say?!?!?

    +1, Nipple Lube!

    For the record: no, we’re not agreed. Just because there are a handful of wingnuts admitting to fucking cheerleaders doesn’t make cheating on your wife OK!

    And I’ll remind you again, this is not a fuckin’ democracy! Didn’t you hear? Democracy failed.

  12. @frank

    Always remember to fold your jackets and gilets flat and tuck them under the jersey. Much mo’ betta than in the pockets.

    So… my lightning quick roll-n-stash of the jacket at that stop light didn’t impress you in the slightest? Need to up my game!

  13. @Oli

    Is that some sort of Flite replica with extra padding?!

    Its the women’s version. It feels better on his mangina.

    @Calmante

    I’m grateful that we don’t use chest pockets any longer!

    +1

  14. @paolo
    One ride pounding over a rough road is all it took for me to destroy my fi'zi:k clip on ballsack. Of course, this was back in the days when I was ignorant of Rule #33.

  15. @mcsqueak

    @frank
    Always remember to fold your jackets and gilets flat and tuck them under the jersey. Much mo’ betta than in the pockets.
    So… my lightning quick roll-n-stash of the jacket at that stop light didn’t impress you in the slightest? Need to up my game!

    After watching you waffle about whether or not to do it, it went unnoticed. Sorry. The right way to do it is to just sit up, unzip, slip it off, fold it a few times until it’s about as wide as your three pockets and nice and flat, and slip it under the jersey, then grab the bars again and carry on.

    All done while riding mid-bunch without deviating from your line and or altering your speed. In a phrase: Casually Deliberate.

  16. @frank

    @BlahEspresso on the screen. +1 badge to you, my man!

    I used to have a button that read “Coffee is God.”

  17. @Albert

    Just thoght I’d throw this into the mix.
    I’m with Gerro on this one.

    @David Millar

    Ok, even I feel bad about this, too cold to wash one bike, so took saddle-bag, pump & training wheels off and put them on a clean bike.

    Looks like he’s not the only pro with scant regard for the rules. But I’m with the lanky Dutchman on this, doesn’t matter whether the pros do it or not, it still needs to look fantastic. And +1 to everyone who’s suggested working out what you actually use and if it includes a stack of tools then get your shit sorted before you ride.

  18. Ok. I am going to revisit this over the next two days that I am off. I will re-pack my shit, drop the EPMS and repeat to my self “it’s not about looking pro it’s about looking fabulous”

  19. @frank

    Well, I learned a lot of interesting facts about the Dutch on Saturday, one such fact that they are an indecisive people. So what I was doing at the stop light was a Dutch Waffle. I’ll try to make my wardrobe decisions in a more efficient, German fashion in the future.

  20. @mcsqueak

    @frank
    Well, I learned a lot of interesting facts about the Dutch on Saturday, one such fact that they are an indecisive people. So what I was doing at the stop light was a Dutch Waffle. I’ll try to make my wardrobe decisions in a more efficient, German fashion in the future.

    The guy who said the Dutch are indecisive must have been using a sample size of one; the Dutch are collectively the most decisive (and opinionated) people you’ll ever meet.

    What you did at the stop light was the Portland Patter.

  21. @Calmante

    I’m grateful that we don’t use chest pockets any longer!

    While the bicycles and riders are interesting in this picture, what is really fascinating is the motley collection of folk behind them.

  22. tried to ride w/ the man-purse under the saddle. kept getting a feeling of ‘hey, that hurts’ every time i turned the pedals. looked down between my thighs, yup, 2 big holes on both sides from the velcro tab that holds the under-seat bag in place. haven’t used one since. necessity dictates that if i can’t wear it, eat it, or use it to help get me home, it ain’t going in my pockets. i carry a tube, mini-pump, small multi-tool, i.d., phone, & a $5. i’m all for mcgiver’ing something to get me home, but the VERY LAST RESORT will be to use that phone. i prefer to be sulf-sufficient, & feeling like i managed it w/out the sag wagon.

  23. @frank

    the Dutch are collectively the most decisive (and opinionated) people you’ll ever meet.

    Well, I’m not sure about that, but I do have on good authority that they have the best dental work in Europe.

  24. a few thoughts:
    1 – i see a few of you are running Lezyne pumps. i can’t find a good comparison between the road drive and the pressure drive. i like the topeak racerocket hp; it’s the first pump i found that’ll get me up to 100psi without my arms snapping off, but it still takes about 350 strokes for a 700×23 tire (only 50 of which are semi-difficult). anyone wanna weigh in on if you can get to that pressure with road/pressure drive (or another?), with less pump strokes?

    2 – i see all but a few of you carry levers. i’m surprised it’s not a rule, in fact, to either not carry them or at least have a sufficiently difficult tire/rim combo to justify their need. you should know if you need ’em, and should certainly know how to remove a tire (in general) without ’em. the idea of Rule #31 is to make you think/organize/minimize your necessary gear, right? if you don’t need ’em, leave ’em.

    3 – i agree with frank about the Lezyne v5 multitool: excellent tool, all you should need on a well-maintained bike, and light enough to forget about. seems it’s named correctly for this crowd as well.

  25. @frank

    @Clips and Straps

    Carry the weight on the bike – not on you.
    When dancing on the pedals uphill do you really want to be lifting that weight up and down every pedal rev ? So Anquetil put his bidon in his jersey pocket at the bottom of a hill. Just Jacque’s way of unsettling his opponents. He carried out mind games all the time.
    Also the damage you can do to yourself if you fall off and all those angular bits of metal get pushed into your soft body. Ouch ! You really will be suffering for your art.
    Nothing wrong with a small under seat pack to carry your stuff.

    If you’re doing it right, dancing on the pedals allows the bike to move more than the rider. Always keep your upper body still: moving your torso is the worst thing you can do and its weight is negligibly added to by adding lightweight tools.
    @chiasticon

    i view use of EPMS vs jersey-packing the same way i do use of co2/pump; it just depends on what the ride/conditions dictate. certainly it’s preferable to go sans-EPMS (the bike looks and feels better), but while trying to employ that approach, the one thing i absolutely DON’T want EVER is to look like this:

    (ugh, it;s like a stuffed pita pocket.) so if i need the pockets for something other than the everyday ride essentials, i’ll employ the EPMS. to at least distribute some of the weight/cargo.
    similarly with co2, i prefer to go with whatever’s lightest but also most appropriate for the ride. two co2 carts plus nozzle outweighs my topeak racerocket hp. so if i’ll need at least two, the pump goes. but if it’s a group ride and i want to hold everyone up as little as possible, i’ll bring co2.
    also, first post. hello!

    Welcome! All good points, but that photo of overstuffed pockets is at least as bad as those of overstuff saddlebags swaying in the wind. But an overstuffed jersey like that is an awful thing. Bottom line: if the pockets are that full, you’re carrying too much. We’re not off to a picnic, we’re out riding our bikes.

    Christ on a stake! Your jersey should bulge like that ONLY if bringing up some bottles to the team! As for me, I leave the side pockets free to carry a few more bidons to the guy that might win. Know your role.

  26. Frank, you old REPROBATE!

    Great piece on the toolkit. Being recently returned to cycling and taking it WAY too seriously, I have spent many hours contemplating this very subject – especially what sort of multi-tool to use (I mean, do I REALLY need a chain breaker?). I hadn’t considered a latex tube for a spare. Putting everything is zip-loc mini-baggies is a nice touch.

    I was wondering just how to carry sufficient tools without having to rely on a under-saddle bag and know I know.

    Thanx

  27. @chiasticon

    2 – i see all but a few of you carry levers. i’m surprised it’s not a rule, in fact, to either not carry them or at least have a sufficiently difficult tire/rim combo to justify their need. you should know if you need ’em, and should certainly know how to remove a tire (in general) without ’em. the idea of Rule #31 is to make you think/organize/minimize your necessary gear, right? if you don’t need ’em, leave ’em.

    How do you change a tire without tire levers?

    And, even if you can, isn’t it quicker and worth the 5g weight penalty to just use tire levers?

  28. Tomorrow I ride sans EPMS!! No need for a mini tool with chain breaker.I haven’t used it on the road in two years since I got my position dialed it. I’ve used the chainbreaker twice in 3 years and both times for someone else. No KMC quick link.

    A tube. 2 co2’s and the little trigger thingy (not a Lezyne one but it’s very small) Lezyne patch kit and levers. Done.

  29. @Albert

    @chiasticon

    2 – i see all but a few of you carry levers. i’m surprised it’s not a rule, in fact, to either not carry them or at least have a sufficiently difficult tire/rim combo to justify their need. you should know if you need ’em, and should certainly know how to remove a tire (in general) without ’em. the idea of Rule #31 is to make you think/organize/minimize your necessary gear, right? if you don’t need ’em, leave ’em.

    How do you change a tire without tire levers?
    And, even if you can, isn’t it quicker and worth the 5g weight penalty to just use tire levers?

    Agree 100%. Anyone who suggests less than two levers have obviously never tried removing a Conti from a Zipp rim.

    @paolo

    Tomorrow I ride sans EPMS!! No need for a mini tool with chain breaker.I haven’t used it on the road in two years since I got my position dialed it. I’ve used the chainbreaker twice in 3 years and both times for someone else. No KMC quick link.
    A tube. 2 co2″²s and the little trigger thingy (not a Lezyne one but it’s very small) Lezyne patch kit and levers. Done.

    Now we’re talkin’!

  30. My shiny new Lezyne levers arrive tomorrow!! I figure there has to be a way to fasten those bastards to the underside of my saddle firmly and without jingling around. Now for that really tiny pump and patch kit …

  31. @frank

    Agree 100%. Anyone who suggests less than two levers have obviously never tried removing a Conti from a Zipp rim.

    no i haven’t. like i said, it won’t work with every combo; and you should know your setup well enough to know if you need ’em. if you don’t, then don’t carry them. one should at least know how to remove a tire without them, i’d say (on rim/tire combos where it’s feasible).

    @albert
    there’s a few vids out there demonstrating it (bicycling.com did one). if nothing else, the vids may still help you loosen the tire up to make removal easier with levers. and it’s not about the weight or bulk, really; just not bringing things i don’t need. a gilet weighs nothing and is barely noticeable in your pocket, but i’m not taking one if i know i won’t need it.

  32. @The Oracle
    Exactly. It looks like a photo that might have the caption: “A group of cyclists has been arrested having inadvertently strayed across the Iranian border”.

  33. @paolo

    Tomorrow I ride sans EPMS!! No need for a mini tool with chain breaker.I haven’t used it on the road in two years since I got my position dialed it. I’ve used the chainbreaker twice in 3 years and both times for someone else. No KMC quick link.
    A tube. 2 co2″²s and the little trigger thingy (not a Lezyne one but it’s very small) Lezyne patch kit and levers. Done.

    I did it!! Casually deliberate 70K in a fucking 40 to 50 k wind mostly. No EPMS, minimal tool kit. Best fitting jersey. I have at least half a dozen jerseys that need to be re thunk ( ie sold and replaced for shit that fits). I felt more pro, I did. First mate I saw said “hey you forgot your bag” ( he has a fi'zi:k clip on also)..”Nope I didn’t forget” and I explained The Word. My bike did look fucking fabulous, I was wrong , you lot were all right and I feel converted. No more EPMS. I have replaced the little fi'zi:k logo in the saddle where the bag was as a sign of affermation!

    Of course the feeling of looking Pro may have been enhanced by the maiden voyage of my white Sidi Ergo 3’s. Yes they cost a shit load of money, yes they felt like two little slices of heaven on my feet!

    When this site is faster and I can be arsed I feel I should post pics of my conformed bike, me and my awesome shoes!

  34. I ride with the following:

    Phone, Inhaler, CO2, Tube, CO2 chuck, patch kit, drivers license, insurance card, multitool, levers, and car keys.

    The Grey thing holds the levers, multitool, a spoke wrench, and the CO2 in a neat package, keeps them from moving around. Works well for me.

  35. @King Clydesdale
    Why are you carrying your keys? I just had another key made and I put it on a super lightweight fob so I don’t lose it.

    On the other hand, I’ve now started carrying my insurance card. Great suggestion!

    @paolo
    Good man!!

  36. From a few days back, but it does seem as if you would need a chain tool in certain situations, Oli. I always pictured it breaking in such a way as to leave two inners, thus requiring only hands & a master link to fix. Not so! Thanks for this!

    Ahh, I love older Flite saddles but it’s good to know that I had better source the original old ones and not buy the reissues. That thing looks like a sofa!

    Heavy site traffic? What’s this?! I don’t know if I can hang around anymore if this place becomes too cool;)

    Oh, and the bidon-as-toolkit actually isn’t a terrible idea for the winter. I never carry two bottles, I have more clothing in my pockets due to the weather. Might be nice to have everything but vest/jacket in one.

    And, I recently lost my beloved gilet! Ah! Cannot figure out where in the heck I lost it. I tuck mine under the jersey, as outlined, and the one I had on that day has the rubberized hem. I can’t imagine it could fall out and I wouldn’t notice. Wouldn’t the thing have gotten caught in my drivetrain? Very sad day, especially since it came not long after the Reverence article on gilets. Sadness. But, I was able to find the exact same one at the same price I paid four years ago. Nice!

    TGIF everyone. Enjoy your weekend riding!

  37. Boom. 200 comments. Toldja.

  38. @King Clydesdale

    Huh, where do you keep this then?

  39. just ran into this one again. made me think of this post.

  40. Lezyne is up there in my list of revered cycling brands, and while PRO (via the Shimano association) has none of the glamour, both together form most of my toolkit, on and off the bike.

    PRO’s multitool is a tiny thing with every tool I might need (and some I don’t – but it’s small enough not to bother. Their seatpost holds my Arione in place, their tape is what I used to cover their bars, and their storage-bidon keeps tube, levers, keys and phone away from the sweat and heat of my back (useful on those 40c summer days).

    Lezyne, on the other hand, are slightly expensive, but I bought their pumps and never regretted the purchase. Excellent. The Pressure Drive Mini hides neatly next to the downtube cage, while their Classic Floor Drive is a thing of beauty that just happens to be the best pump in the family – and it’s mine. Screw-on hoses are the only way I roll, and after a pinch-flat last week, I learned to appreciate the ease with which the tiny Pressure Drive gets me to 80-90PSI. I aspire to own their cages and tools as well, but that would require a new #1 bike.

  41. If you have carbon rims, do not use metal tyre levers. Especially if your rims are Tune Schwarzebrenners which, while hard to spell, are even harder to repair.

  42. Here’s a photo of the Rule #31 tubular kit I’ve been employing as of late:

    1.) Pre-glued and folded tubular inside bag, with Lezyne Pressure Carbon Drive rubber-banded to it. Inside the bag with the tubular I also have a tire lever and the tiny valve core tool Vittoria supplies with their valve extenders. These two items may get ditched when I get a dedicated valve extension on the spare, and realize that a tire lever is of limited utility with a tubular

    2.) ID, debit card, house key, and mini-tool rubber-banded together.

    This setup has been working like a charm.  The tire obviously goes in the middle pocket, and while I was concerned about a hunchback effect, it’s actually pretty low profile.  The load is easily supported without bounce or sag by Jersey #1 [Castelli Aero Race 3.1].  Once I get an appropriate pedal cage toe strap, I might employ the spare tubular underneath the saddle when Rule #9 and Rule #21 conditions apply.

    By the way, the Lezyne pump is Top Notch.  Gave it a practice run at home and got to exactly 90psi in 200 strokes without breaking a sweat.  It disappears inside a jersey pocket and is super light weight.  The flexible hose is a godsend. For all but the most demanding of occasions, I am done with C02.

  43. I found something out today at work.  Lezyne is a bunch of damn liars.

  44. @ZachOlson

    I found something out today at work.  Lezyne is a bunch of damn liars.

    If you measure it on a Lezyne scale it would be exactly 27 grams.

  45. @frank

    @ZachOlson

    I found something out today at work.  Lezyne is a bunch of damn liars.

    If you measure it on a Lezyne scale it would be exactly 27 grams.

    And if you weigh your Park hex wrenches on either scale, they’ll still be rounded off or bent…

  46. @frank

    @ZachOlson

    I found something out today at work.  Lezyne is a bunch of damn liars.

    If you measure it on a Lezyne scale it would be exactly 27 grams.

    I bet that’s why the Park patch kit was so much lighter! It’s a damn conspiracy!

  47. Slideshow:

    Fullscreen:

    I’m bringing this thread back baby!

    recently purchased this incredibly unnecessary, albeit almost lewdly supple and fantastic looking, bit of kit. credit card, id, insurance card go in a zipped inner pocket; tube, tool, levers all fit like a perfect tetris shape inside and my iphone can fit in the other side sleeve to protect from scratching or in a side jersey pocket for easier access

  48. @mpalazzi92

    Comment 210 eh? Amazing this whips up such interest again and again. Rapha waved this in front of my face too but I am still using my Lezyne phone/card/cash zippered thing. But yeah, Rapha does not fool around so I bet this is a beauty. And in ten years it will look properly worn and glossy and you will still be using it unless you leave it in a pub after a long ride and too many pints. Doh!

  49. @Gianni watching A Sunday In Hell for the umpteenth time and rummaging through old threads has proven to be a great time killing activity while I wait for my rollers to come

  50. Your rollers? You poor antipodean. At least you will be well on your way to the perfect stroke.

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