Tire patches? Try frame protectors.

Reverence: Park Tool Super Patch

Reverence: Park Tool Super Patch

by / / 88 posts

The first tire patch kit I ever owned came in a big green box, had several patches of various sizes which were possibly made of old truck tires. It also came with a sheet of 60 grit sandpaper. The mild high offered from sniffing the glue while applying the patch almost made you stop caring you’d gotten a flat in the first place. Stoned on glue and hypoxic from the V is no way to mend a tire, and most times the patch would start to come off even before I pumped it up and I’d have to start over. Don’t even start me on peeling the clear cellophane off the patch.

The telephone capability of my iPhone is the least-used feature on the device; I email, schedule, text, voxer, browse, twitface, photograph, drop, forget, lose, and find my phone much more than I ever use it to place a call. It has replaced my wristwatch, alarm clock, and flashlight. For some of you, it has even replaced the cyclometer. All this is to say that in today’s view of the world, the value of a product is directly proportional to how useless its original function is.

By that measure, the Park Super Patch kit earns its place in the pantheon of the Reverence series by being more useful as a frame protector than it is as a inner tube patch. They are phenomenal tire patches – much better than the old orange-trimmed slabs of tire I used growing up, but who wants to use a tire patch, much less love one? Therein lies the answer; even as the world of Cycling irrevocably makes its departure from the tire and tube with one faction moving back to the tubular tire and another to the tubeless tire, these patches will continue to feature on frames around the world, dutifully keeping cables from scuffing paint.

Slideshow:
Fullscreen:

// Accessories and Gear // Reverence

  1. @frank

    My theory is that for the first 30 minutes that an article is up, people read it. After that, 50% of the people glance at the lead photo, skip the article, and jump to the posts. 50% don’t even look at the photo.

    It’s hard to track the analytics on this, so I have to rely on people doing things like that to gather the data. So really you’re just helping to support the theory.

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    @ frank I think the writing’s great, it’s what sparks the comments and sets the tone for the experience of the Community. When I first learned of the Velominati and read the Rules online, my S.O. ordered the book for me based on my reaction, before the U.S. version. I enjoy coming here.

  2. Did someone say there was quality writing here?

  3. @scaler911

    Fan-fucking-tastic idea! Heading to the shop immediately.

    Isn’t co-enabling great!

  4. @Bigthumpa

    Two words: Internal routing.

    One word: titanium.

  5. I patch the shit out of the tubes for my training bike, but avoid racing on patched inner tubes – it’s just not the done thing. I’m more likely to pour on the heat and plow through shit (potholes, debris) in a race than in a training ride or club ride, when I’ll be more delicate and try to avoid stuff, and I don’t want a patched tube to start leaking if I hit something.

    Gatorskins are training tyres, not racing tyres, and one of the properties that makes them a better training tyre is a harder tread compound. Less grip, more durability. Expecting it to ride like a soft Michelin is like grabbing the wrong end of the donkey for a ride at the fairground.

  6. @Teocalli

    @frank

    I have never once in my life seen a rider discard their tubes at the side of the road. Seems to me an urban legend.

    Maybe it’s a UK ID-ten-T problem as I see all too many over here. I guess I need to start picking them up and try to find something like Alchemy or just bring a bag over when I’m out in Colorado and drop them in at REI.

    I’m with @frank on this but as we only live a few miles apart I’m going to need to keep my eyes open for this disgraceful behaviour. Dont like the thought of verbally abusing another cyclist, but like you said, these tossers clearly aren’t on the path.

  7. @Mike_P

    @Teocalli

    @frank

    I have never once in my life seen a rider discard their tubes at the side of the road. Seems to me an urban legend.

    Maybe it’s a UK ID-ten-T problem as I see all too many over here. I guess I need to start picking them up and try to find something like Alchemy or just bring a bag over when I’m out in Colorado and drop them in at REI.

    I’m with @frank on this but as we only live a few miles apart I’m going to need to keep my eyes open for this disgraceful behaviour. Dont like the thought of verbally abusing another cyclist, but like you said, these tossers clearly aren’t on the path.

    Mike – there are a very small minority of sportive riders who seem to do it, which is where I see it mostly and as I regularly cycle sportive routes around here I see them left over afterwards.  Doubtless hell bent on a Strava time and can’t be bothered to take their trash home.  It’s not huge numbers but enough to be sad about the attitude of people who do it.

  8. @scaler911

    @frank

    @Bigthumpa


    @Bigthumpa

    Two words: Internal routing.

    Did you look at the photo(s)?

    @frank

    Ah…

    My theory is that for the first 30 minutes that an article is up, people read it. After that, 50% of the people glance at the lead photo, skip the article, and jump to the posts. 50% don’t even look at the photo.

    It’s hard to track the analytics on this, so I have to rely on people doing things like that to gather the data. So really you’re just helping to support the theory.

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    Hey, I always read the articles. ALLLLWAAAYYYSSSSS.

    Many years ago I bought my father a Birthday Card which rather backfired on me.  It went something like, on the front  “Dad, I listen to every piece of advice you give me” then inside it said “I ignore most of it, but I do listen.  Happy Birthday”.

  9. @Teocalli I hear you.  I rode my first Italian gran fondo last year and the organisers were very clear, if you’re reported as a litterer you’re banned from the next year’s entry.  The route was virtually spotless other than around the bins at feed zones. I fear the explosion of events in the UK, many of which are poorly organised and simply jumping on the bandwagon of popularity, influence this shoddy behaviour. Plus UK society in general seems to be moving towards complete acceptance of the basest levels of antisocial behaviour. Time I got off my soap box. Rant over.

  10. On the etape caledonia the number of tubes, bottles and wrappers strewn around was disappointing. After all its not a race so you can take a few more seconds to put stuff back in your pocket surely. It was the number of bottles I found amazing, obviously a lot of people get them FOC?

  11. @norm I agree, up to a point; I was just servicing my well used CX and noticed that there was some cable rub around the head tube – the metal shining through the dark gray paint adds character, likewise the scrapes from stacking it.  If this was on the #1 carbon I would have been distruaght.

    Battle scars on an MTB or CX may be fine and I guess even on an older ride, but on a shiney new #1? no.

    There is no excuse for breakig Rule #65 – pantina from use is one thing, neglect is something quite different.

  12. @revchuck

    @PeakInTwoYears

    Very, very few flats on either Gatorshins or 4000s. But try descending on the former.

    Or riding in the rain. Last weekend during a rainy ride, we rounded a corner at a moderate speed and the rear tire of the guy in front of me just slipped over 15cm or so. He was riding on Gatorskins. He’s a skilled rider, so it didn’t mess him up. The guy in front of him was on 4000Ss, I was on Michelin Krylions, and neither of us had any traction problems.

    I big part of that can be how he weighted his bike, not the tires.

    But to that point, I do prefer GP4000 All Weather’s over the gatorskin, which seems to give up a lot of road feel for not much more protection.

  13. @Andre the Fish

    @norm I agree, up to a point; I was just servicing my well used CX and noticed that there was some cable rub around the head tube – the metal shining through the dark gray paint adds character, likewise the scrapes from stacking it. If this was on the #1 carbon I would have been distruaght.

    Battle scars on an MTB or CX may be fine and I guess even on an older ride, but on a shiney new #1? no.

    There is no excuse for breakig Rule #65 – pantina from use is one thing, neglect is something quite different.

    I actually agree with this; It adds character for sure. In fact, I wrote a bit on this before, but have taken to adding some patches since getting the custom painted Veloforma bikes and running Yokozuna cables, which really tear into the paint. Once the paint gets beat up, I’ll get over it and go back to letting it evolve.

  14. @frank I try to read all the articles in spurts, hence my sporadic commenting pattern.  I think the quality of writing on the site is excellent.  It strikes a great balance between conversational and formal. To me, the greatest asset of this site is the conversation the articles foster, and the lunatics that participate in them.

    When you stand back and think about it, a bunch of middle aged guys who mostly haven’t met one another and like to wear lycra in public while riding bikes for fun like little kids are an unlikely bunch to maintain decorum, focus and humor in an internet conversation.  Yet here we are, with our tongue in cheek seriousness, genuine camaraderie and hilarious arguments about something that the rest of the world considers (at best) kind of silly.  You must be doing something right, just keep doing what you’re doing.

    That said, what happened to good old fashioned electrical tape?  Comes in a bunch of colors, sticks well, and (if you use the good stuff) leaves no residue.

  15. Good scars, bad scars….like a lot of what we do, its nuanced @Frank.  Nice writing by the way, sums it up perfectly.

    @Norms use of the word patina is spot on; both good and bad come with age and use – its a time thing.

  16. Repurposing quality materials is pro. I do this all the time. All real engineers have a repurpose gene.

    It is seldom that I have a flat traceable to a patch. Fairly, since I have gone tubeless, I have not had a tube issue. My VMH is still on tubes, and since I do the maint on her bike, I have a system for patching: She carries spare tubes, and if there’s a puncture on the road, we replace with a new tube. I keep the punctured one, and if repairable, I patch it. I save those for when gyres get replaced. Fairly, not all punctures are patchable-large gashes, or a seam blows. Those get recycled.

    So far, about 2000 miles on tubeless fusion 3 with SNT conversions of stock Neuvation clinchers, and no one the road failures. One puncture on a (Imperial) century that self-sealed as designed. Next upgrade for the Fucking Bike is to move to tubeless specific 2014 Eastons when the Price is Right.

    But…to the point of the article, I also like purposed tech, like the Jagwire Tube Tops:

    http://jagwire.com/products/v/Tube_Tops

  17. @Mike_P

    @JohnB

    Do these Park patches have a use by date? For years I’ve carried a pack as an emergency get me home fix if I ran out of new tubes. Never ever used one. If I repair when I get home it’s by the traditional feather edged patch, vulcanising solution and French chalk method. Done right that doesn’t fail. By all means leave the cellophane backing in place but not any metal foil backing. I’ve never even considered using a PT patch as a frame protector. Thanks Frank. Better than clear Lizard Skins?

    iphone still predominantly a calling device for me.

    I used one that was 5 years old a couple of months ago. It’s still attached and working ok.

    I’ve suffered a bit of a glut of punctures recently after a couple of years of with only a couples of punctured tubulars so I really can’t remember how old my park patches are (possibly pre-road bike) but I’ve had a few fail when I’ve used CO2 to reinflate.

  18. I participated in a recent sportive that had a great idea to prevent littering: They gave you a free gel if you brought your empty wrappers back to the finish.

    A free gel per empty wrapper would have been nice, but it’s a good start.

  19. @Bigthumpa

    I participated in a recent sportive that had a great idea to prevent littering: They gave you a free gel if you brought your empty wrappers back to the finish.

    A free gel per empty wrapper would have been nice, but it’s a good start.

    Based on this post, I have to ask a question: are you Scottish or Dutch? You cannot be of another origin, being that cheap.

  20. @eightzero

    But…to the point of the article, I also like purposed tech, like the Jagwire Tube Tops:

    Have used those as well; however, if you ride cobbles or gravel, you will find them at the end of your cables where do do little good.

    But they’re great for people like you whose bike sit in the house all winter rather than getting ridden.

    *ducks and runs*

  21. @frank

    @eightzero

    But…to the point of the article, I also like purposed tech, like the Jagwire Tube Tops:

    Have used those as well; however, if you ride cobbles or gravel, you will find them at the end of your cables where do do little good.

    What is this “cobbles or gravel” you speak of?

    But they’re great for people like you whose bike sit in the house all winter rather than getting ridden.

    *ducks and runs*

    When as old as am I you reach, look as good you will not.

  22. @frank

    @Bigthumpa

    I participated in a recent sportive that had a great idea to prevent littering: They gave you a free gel if you brought your empty wrappers back to the finish.

    A free gel per empty wrapper would have been nice, but it’s a good start.

    Based on this post, I have to ask a question: are you Scottish or Dutch? You cannot be of another origin, being that cheap.

    Oh Frank, how you neglect Asians in this equation. Why, I bet you there were families of them out there picking the wrappers out of garbage bins and heading to the finish line with them, trading them in for a full one. In true Asian spirit, it would have been each member of the family making an exchange, 1 at a time…acting like they didn’t just come through the line 10 minutes earlier

  23. @eightzero Those tube tops don’t do much, if anything. The problem with cable rub is grit and debris trapped between cable housing and frame. All you’ve done by adding the tube top is change where the crud gets stuck to.

  24. I’m with the patina guys as my bikes are well worn in from several years on the road (and trail). The PT clear patch idea would be good for the n+1 I’m GASing for though.

    I’m Dutch and Canadian so yes, I have a bucket-o-tubes in the basement and every intention of patching them them at some point this winter. Had Michelin Pro4 SC. Nice, but lots of flats. Switched to GP 4000s. Nice. One flat so far after 6 months.

    (An iPhone can receive telephone calls? What will they think of next?)

  25. @roger

    @eightzero Those tube tops don’t do much, if anything. The problem with cable rub is grit and debris trapped between cable housing and frame. All you’ve done by adding the tube top is change where the crud gets stuck to.

    Crud? You ride where crud can contaminate a bike? I have a more elegant solution.

  26. @frank

    @Bigthumpa


    @Bigthumpa

    Two words: Internal routing.

    Did you look at the photo(s)?

    @frank

    Ah…

    My theory is that for the first 30 minutes that an article is up, people read it. After that, 50% of the people glance at the lead photo, skip the article, and jump to the posts. 50% don’t even look at the photo.

    It’s hard to track the analytics on this, so I have to rely on people doing things like that to gather the data. So really you’re just helping to support the theory.

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    Wrong !  This little black duck is hooked by the title, looks at the picture, reads article then goes to page 1 of the posts and reads.

    How else can I get a feeling of what someone has bothered to write?

    To do it any other way would be “Un-Australian”

  27. @frank Wrong. I think most of us read all the articles. And what’s more I think everyone who has picked up the book at my house has chuckled and gone home to check out the web-site and maybe even signed up. You’re doing soemthing right.

    And I think the tube chucking cyclist must be real, but like the yeti/bigfoot/mermaids only his tracks are seen (i.e. dead tubes at the roadside), never the creature himself. I like to think that is because, if this behaviour was actually witnessed it would be followed someone jamming an inflating device firmly where the sun doesn’t shine, preferably sideways.

    @Barracuda exactly.

  28. @Barracuda

    @frank

    @Bigthumpa


    @Bigthumpa

    Two words: Internal routing.

    Did you look at the photo(s)?

    @frank

    Ah…

    My theory is that for the first 30 minutes that an article is up, people read it. After that, 50% of the people glance at the lead photo, skip the article, and jump to the posts. 50% don’t even look at the photo.

    It’s hard to track the analytics on this, so I have to rely on people doing things like that to gather the data. So really you’re just helping to support the theory.

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    Wrong ! This little black duck is hooked by the title, looks at the picture, reads article then goes to page 1 of the posts and reads.

    How else can I get a feeling of what someone has bothered to write?

    To do it any other way would be “Un-Australian”

    yeah but that’s mainly because we’ll do anything to avoid actually doing work while in the office…

  29. @freddy

    I’m with the patina guys as my bikes are well worn in from several years on the road (and trail). The PT clear patch idea would be good for the n+1 I’m GASing for though.

    I’m Dutch and Canadian so yes, I have a bucket-o-tubes in the basement and every intention of patching them them at some point this winter. Had Michelin Pro4 SC. Nice, but lots of flats. Switched to GP 4000s. Nice. One flat so far after 6 months.

    (An iPhone can receive telephone calls? What will they think of next?)

    I hear that with iOS8, it will be able to receive a fax, too. Its gonna be bodacious.

    @eightzero

    @roger

    @eightzero Those tube tops don’t do much, if anything. The problem with cable rub is grit and debris trapped between cable housing and frame. All you’ve done by adding the tube top is change where the crud gets stuck to.

    Crud? You ride where crud can contaminate a bike? I have a more elegant solution.

    Just so I know we’re on the same page, you mean “not riding”, right?

  30. @Frank You are a very naughty man – for one minute you made me squint at the photo as I could not decide if the front wheel belonged to the “patched” frame, and if so surely the tyre was on back to front.

  31. @eightzero

    @frank

    @eightzero

    But…to the point of the article, I also like purposed tech, like the Jagwire Tube Tops:

    Have used those as well; however, if you ride cobbles or gravel, you will find them at the end of your cables where do do little good.

    What is this “cobbles or gravel” you speak of?

    But they’re great for people like you whose bike sit in the house all winter rather than getting ridden.

    *ducks and runs*

    When as old as am I you reach, look as good you will not.

    Dammit, you stole my line!

  32. @frank

     

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    For a long time I was just reading the articles, not actually reading the comments.   Which is all to say that the quality of the writing, while irrelevant, is superb.

  33. The last set of park tool levers I bought had a set of these. I hope they haven’t been tossed. I am still trying to figure out a good purpose for the old/scrap bar tape I have in a box… Any suggestions?

    @razmaspaz

    @frank

    Which is all to say that the quality of our writing is irrelevant to the experience of the Community. From this perspective, it amazes me that the book is selling.

    For a long time I was just reading the articles, not actually reading the comments. Which is all to say that the quality of the writing, while irrelevant, is superb.

    It took me a minute to catch on to how the site worked. I spent a bit of time looking for a message board or forums section. The true gems on this site come from the comments IMO. No offense @frank your writing is superb. But the true hilarity ensues when people start posting neon kits and arguing about tire sizes. I have also gleaned more knowledge about the good ol’ days of cycling in a couple days from the messages than I could in a week of internet browsing.

    Cheers to the Velominati!

  34. @razmaspaz

    For a long time I was just reading the articles, not actually reading the comments. Which is all to say that the quality of the writing, while irrelevant, is superb.

    The writing is sad drivel, written by self-appointed guardians of the elitist notion that cycling is the purview of racers and pretend racers who are more concerned with expensive fashion than they are with just getting out and riding a bike for fun and sustainability. It drives a wedge into the cycling community and does a disservice to people and the planet.

    At least that’s what the trolls all say.

  35. The Park Super Patch also works awesome for fixing your shower curtain when rod loop thingy tears the hole out.

  36. @DCR

    ………….. I am still trying to figure out a good purpose for the old/scrap bar tape I have in a box… Any suggestions?

    Christmas decorations?  The perfect door Yuletide Wreath for a cyclist – twigs rapped in old bar tape add a bit of mud, road grit and the odd picked up twig or two, what could be better?  I must go and copyright the idea immediately…………

  37. @DCR

    The last set of park tool levers I bought had a set of these. I hope they haven’t been tossed. I am still trying to figure out a good purpose for the old/scrap bar tape I have in a box… Any suggestions?

    Not sure what to do with “scraps”, but when I change mine out, I’ve used it to wrap wheel barrel handles and my lawn mower handle when the foamy wrap wears out.

  38. @eightzero Are you trying to hijack this thread? It’s like when an attractive woman with a revealing top walks into a pub….nice welds!

  39. @freddy

    And if that woman happened to be…

    Tuesday Weld?

  40. @PeakInTwoYears

    @razmaspaz

    For a long time I was just reading the articles, not actually reading the comments. Which is all to say that the quality of the writing, while irrelevant, is superb.

    written by self-appointed guardians of the elitist notion that cycling is the purview of racers and pretend racers who are more concerned with expensive fashion than they are with just getting out and riding a bike for fun and sustainability.

    Why do you think I like it so much?

  41. @roger

    @frank

    @Bigthumpa

    I participated in a recent sportive that had a great idea to prevent littering: They gave you a free gel if you brought your empty wrappers back to the finish.

    A free gel per empty wrapper would have been nice, but it’s a good start.

    Based on this post, I have to ask a question: are you Scottish or Dutch? You cannot be of another origin, being that cheap.

    Oh Frank, how you neglect Asians in this equation. Why, I bet you there were families of them out there picking the wrappers out of garbage bins and heading to the finish line with them, trading them in for a full one. In true Asian spirit, it would have been each member of the family making an exchange, 1 at a time…acting like they didn’t just come through the line 10 minutes earlier

    Och, I shoulda thought of that!

  42. Meanwhile, behind the facade of this innocent looking bookstore…

  43. @Cyclops Sweet

  44. @frank

    @freddy

    I’m with the patina guys as my bikes are well worn in from several years on the road (and trail). The PT clear patch idea would be good for the n+1 I’m GASing for though.

    I’m Dutch and Canadian so yes, I have a bucket-o-tubes in the basement and every intention of patching them them at some point this winter. Had Michelin Pro4 SC. Nice, but lots of flats. Switched to GP 4000s. Nice. One flat so far after 6 months.

    (An iPhone can receive telephone calls? What will they think of next?)

    I hear that with iOS8, it will be able to receive a fax, too. Its gonna be bodacious.

    @eightzero

    @roger

    @eightzero Those tube tops don’t do much, if anything. The problem with cable rub is grit and debris trapped between cable housing and frame. All you’ve done by adding the tube top is change where the crud gets stuck to.

    Crud? You ride where crud can contaminate a bike? I have a more elegant solution.

    Just so I know we’re on the same page, you mean “not riding”, right?

    Not riding in crud, yes. There are these things called “roads.” And, your bike is like your ass – when done using it, you wipe it off.

  45. @freddy

    @eightzero Are you trying to hijack this thread? It’s like when an attractive woman with a revealing top walks into a pub….nice welds!

     

     

    A product of the Seven factory. And the pic taken with my brand new iPhone 5s, replacing the vaseline smeared iP4 that took all the crappy pictures at the V-to-V cogal. The lens was scratched to shit, so upgrade was needed in preparation for the next Cogal.

  46. @eightzero

    And by “the next Cogal,” do you refer to a notional event that has been putatively projected for the summer of 2014 and that may or may not be a ride from Seattle to Vancouver, which one can’t know because the event remains purely notional and indeed apocryphal because it hasn’t been blessed and published by the Keepers?

  47. @PeakInTwoYears

    We will put any Cogal up. We pass no judgment as long as it conforms in the thinnest sense to the definition, notionally, if you will. Most importantly is the need for a piss up afterward. The piss up is a putative keystone of the Cogal. 

  48. @Gianni

    @PeakInTwoYears

    We will put any Cogal up. We pass no judgment as long as it conforms in the thinnest sense to the definition, notionally, if you will. Most importantly is the need for a piss up afterward. The piss up is a putative keystone of the Cogal.

    @gianni Pretty sure Peaks is giving you some shit about the STV Cogal article “in the queue.” It contains details of the requisite PissUp.

  49. @eightzero

    Yes. I am with child to know the details of that ride, putative or even putain-itive as it may be. The darkness is descending, it’s 4:49pm and already past official sunset, and I feel a penetrating desire for some vision of the other side of this hellish tunnel I am entering for the next several months.

  50. @PeakInTwoYears

    @eightzero

    Yes. I am with child to know the details of that ride, putative or even putain-itive as it may be. The darkness is descending, it’s 4:49pm and already past official sunset, and I feel a penetrating desire for some vision of the other side of this hellish tunnel I am entering for the next several months.

    All you need to know: 7/12/14, Arlington WA.

Leave a Reply