Theory of Bike Fitting: Tall Riders Walk Their Own Path

Theory of Bike Fitting: Tall Riders Walk Their Own Path

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How does a cyclist lower their center of mass? Well, you can be shorter, that works pretty well. Or cut yourself off at the knees, but that has other side effects that I don’t want to get into right now. You could also lower the bottom bracket like Look and Eddy Merckx used to do (I think they raised their BB to the standard height recently).

Buth the real solution is that in most cases – at least in the cycling world, taller means lankier and that means that proportionally, the distances and angles between legs, arms, handlebars, saddles, and pedals start being very different – and should be much more extreme – than the scaled-up picture model of the 5’10” rider on a 56.

I have found over the last 23 years of riding that when I lower my bars, two things happen. First, I have better control over my machine. Second, I go faster. After having my bars as low as they would go on my R3 and consistently feeling they were a bit too high, I bought a 17 degree stem for my R3 which lowered my bars by 2cm- more than I thought I wanted. The results were astounding. Not only does my bike handle better, but I ride about 1-2kmph faster on flats and on climbs. The speed factor can be attributed to freakish bio-mechanics (that may be unique to my physiology) and/or increased aerodynamics, but the bike handling is, I believe, directly related to my lowered center of mass. In fact, John – who is also an Eros Poli-sized rider such as myself – noticed how good a low, aggressive position feels after borrowing one of my bikes during a visit to Seattle.

The bottom line is that you have to be comfortable on a bike, and that means different things to different people based on their size, flexibility, and style of riding. That said, I urge tall riders to experiment with riding the smallest frame you can while still getting enough saddle height and top tube length needed to ride efficiently – and then ride your bars as low as you can. If you need an example from the pros, take a look at Axel Merckx’s position (at the top of this post, as well as compared to Floyd Landis above), or keep in mind that Greg Rast on team Astana had Trek build him a frame with the dimensions of a 61cm frame with the head tube height of a 56cm frame – and slams his handlebar stem right down on his top tube.

It’s all about your center of mass, baby.

// Racing // Technology

  1. Not sure who is planning on riding this one, but check out the saddle-bar drop and stem length. Frank, maybe this should be your next bike if you’re looking for an ISP frame:

  2. Ok, that didn’t seem to work so I’ll just link to the photo

  3. @michael

    More fodder. Trebon’s new bike, presumably fitted to him already.

    Saw this bike in the flesh today, the saddle was pushed a good bit forward of what it is in the photo, but what’s a guy to do?

  4. @frank

    Ignore the cans of Australian piss water in my jersey which I had an inexplicable hankering for; but these pics here are about as close as I can find to side-shots of me on the R3. Try not to be too envious of how Awesome I am.

    Fosters?

  5. @minion
    Fuck me, I was looking for those pictures during the recent Fosters debacle. I knew they were here somewhere.

  6. Hehe, I have a feeling they’re going to be bumped a fair bit.
    It is worth noting that in the thread MArcus tried to point out that no-one in Aus drinks Fosters. All that tells me is that Marcus has been lying for a year.

  7. Okay, serious proper question about bike fitting.

    I was in a store last week and they offer a bike fit service, takes 2 or 3 hours and seems to involve all manner of measurements, lasers and video and what not, cost is £120, with follow up service after a week or two if needed.

    Is it worth thinking about ? Or do I just fanny about with my seat position etc and see how things go.

  8. If a seat position is your only problem and you are sure it’s the seat than I wouldn’t do the bike fitting.If you never did one and you are constantly unsure about your frame size,stem length etc. that could be possibly the best way you ever  spend 120 quid.

    If you need help with saddle height and/or for/aft position there are few good starting points.What’s the problem with your set up exactly?

  9. @Nate

    Nevermind Fosters,is that a fucking EPMS?

  10. @TommyTubolare Its compounding the crimes,  isn’t it. If you’ve got two giant cans of pisswater in your pocket you need an epms

  11. @minion

    Most definitely.

  12. @TommyTubolare

    If a seat position is your only problem and you are sure it’s the seat than I wouldn’t do the bike fitting.If you never did one and you are constantly unsure about your frame size,stem length etc. that could be possibly the best way you ever spend 120 quid.

    If you need help with saddle height and/or for/aft position there are few good starting points.What’s the problem with your set up exactly?

    Well tbh maybe I do not know if there IS a problem, but I think maybe we all just adapt to our position somehow, however all I can say is I shift around on the saddle a bit (for and aft) and after some time on a ride I get numb fingers. I do feel better when I move forward toward the seat nose a bit in terms of speed. It’s all a bit of a black art to me. Maybe I shall treat myself to an early crimbo present.

  13. @strathlubnaig  I did a bike fit with a local coach and bike fitter. Took almost two hours. Well worthwhile.  A mate swears by the Retul fit, but I think it’s pretty pricey.

  14. @TommyTubolare

    @Nate

    Nevermind Fosters,is that a fucking EPMS?

    It was a toe-strapped satchel briefly used while riding in a jersey a size too big before I could have smaller ones made.

    Talk about a photo that continues to haunt. Merckx bless the internet.

  15. @strathlubnaig

    @TommyTubolare

    If a seat position is your only problem and you are sure it’s the seat than I wouldn’t do the bike fitting.If you never did one and you are constantly unsure about your frame size,stem length etc. that could be possibly the best way you ever spend 120 quid.

    If you need help with saddle height and/or for/aft position there are few good starting points.What’s the problem with your set up exactly?

    Well tbh maybe I do not know if there IS a problem, but I think maybe we all just adapt to our position somehow, however all I can say is I shift around on the saddle a bit (for and aft) and after some time on a ride I get numb fingers. I do feel better when I move forward toward the seat nose a bit in terms of speed. It’s all a bit of a black art to me. Maybe I shall treat myself to an early crimbo present.

    Are you abnormally shaped at all? I think for “regular” people, they will get you close, if you are at all advanced or irregularly shaped, they may be lost and just apply all the usual rules of thumb to something that is not a thumb.

    If you have pain somewhere, definitely do it. I think that is what Tommy means by “what is wrong”. If you have no pains, then you can play around with for/aft on the saddle. It is normal to move about on the saddle, by the way, but your typical position should be on the most comfortable bit of the saddle to sit on. When you go hard, you’ll slide forward. When looking for quad power, slide back.

    Numb hands doesn’t sound good, though. Your bars may be too low.

  16. @frank We’ve had this debate before and you’re still wrong. The tendency when going hard is to slide forwards, but this is what really loads the quads, not moving back – the further back you sit (within reason) the more you recruit your glutes and hamstrings. Ideally you want to be smack in the centre to achieve a balance.

  17. @Oli

    What relation does that have to the KOPS fitting concept?

  18. KOPS is completely bogus, so nothing really.

  19. @Oli

    What do you recommend for setting saddle setback then?  I noticed I tended to be not on my sit-bones, so I have my saddle 6cm setback, at 80cm height.  I understand everyone is different and you can’t really fit over the internet, but am I doing something wrong?  This is the one part of my fit I always kinda wonder about, but I don’t have any discomfort.

  20. Reading the article it makes mention of Axel Merckx and Floyd Landis, but the picture is Thor?

  21. @frank

    Are you abnormally shaped at all?

    Are there any tips or ‘general rules’ you would recommend for someone with short legs, long arms & torso? I’m 181cm tall with a 78.5cm inseam and a particularly disproportionate 210cm wingspan.

  22. @DerHoggz Sorry, I don’t mind debunking myths with offhand calls but answering that is impossible online, I’m afraid – just off the top of my head, it could be to do with your seat height, the saddle itself, your handlebar height, your flexibility, your reach to the ‘bars, or some combination of the above.

  23. @Nate admiring how ‘awesome’ your Thoracic extension is. Tut tut for those long rides!

  24. @madcaddiekarlos If you are referring to the gentleman with cans of Fosters in the jersey pockets, that’s not me.

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