graveur

Something Beautiful

Something Beautiful

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Despite the proclivity towards being all-knowing that comes as a consequence of my being Dutch, the most beautiful things in life are discoveries that come as a result of not knowing. We are quick to answer but slow to think; the easy solution lies at our fingertips while the true mystery lurks just beyond, ready to reveal her secrets if only we are willing to venture into the unknown. Beauty is found in the journey, not the destination.

As Cyclists, we start our journey with the simple joy of pedalling a bicycle and escaping the clumsy limitations of bipedal locomotion – walking quickly loses its luster when you can pedal a bike instead. First we pedal to explore the limits of our range, then the limits of our speed. Finally, we pedal to explore the limits within ourselves as speed and range are tested together.

When we free ourselves from the confines of our local and familiar roads and point the bicycle towards parts unknown, we rediscover the childish beauty of exploration that came when we first started riding a bike. Not knowing what lies around the next bend is a mysterious sort of riding completely different from the regimented training we have become accustomed to. The familiar pressure will be there in our heart, lungs, and legs, but with it will come an element of nervous excitement at the anticipating the unknown. Whether we encounter a dead end or a gravel road; none of it matters in the scope of discovery.

One of the amazing things about a competent rider aboard a bicycle is how much distance can be covered in a day. After 8, 10, or 12 hours away, we can look at a globe and see the stretch of land we covered. The mind will be tired from the effort from having pushed the body and wondering about what will be coming next. The body will be empty, the lungs will have that familiar tension from supplying oxygen-starved muscles with fuel. The look in the rider’s eye will be one of the exhilaration that only comes as a result of total exhaustion.

We need this sort of emptiness in order to feel fulfilled. There is something beautiful to be discovered when we push into the unknown.

// Defining Moments // Evanescent Riders // Nostalgia // Tradition

  1. @Barracuda

    @frank – correct, Im Australian, not smart. I cant do both.

    Possibly the most compact and accurate statement I’ve heard about Australians. Thank you.

  2. @Puffy

    Arr I just long for the time when life was sufficiently unencumbered I could do an 8hr ride. That time has been, but will come again.

    Priorities, my man. Or backroom deals with the family. Or say you’re going to work, take the day off instead, and go ride?

    @Coyotetree

    This is my first post. I’ve been following you all for the last year almost as obsessively as I ride. I have learned so much from all of you. I am only a mere Pedalwan, even if I’ve been riding my whole life. This article compelled me to post. It is exactly how I feel and why I love to ride . Hammer meets nail right on the fucking head. THANK YOU VELOMINATI!!

    Welcome mate! And always remember we are all Pedalwans, no matter how much we know there is always more to learn.

  3. @Teocalli

    @strathlubnaig

    @frank

    @the Engine

    @Harminator

    @the Engine

    Love those long rides where you look at them on the app and you can see the whole island…

    My island must be bigger than your island.

    Or my rides are longer than your rides

    I thought Scotland was a Yard, not an island?

    Scotland is a landmass which had the misfortune of bumping into what is often called England eons ago. This is now called Scotlands Yard.

    and depending on the upcoming vote we may have to dig out the canal and push it off again.

    Its amazing that secession vote is allowed to go through. Last time that happened in the United States it started a war that The South thinks is still going on or, if not, will start up again sometime after they finish this Mint Julep.

  4. @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @Buck Rogers

    Longest ride on tap for me today in over a year. I will indeed being clearing my mind before I am done.

    Also, LOVING that lead photo.

    Don’t you live in Cycling Heaven?

    FUCK it is Hilly around here! I am much too weak. I ended up only riding a tad over 86 k’s but had over 1100 meters of climbing with multiple grades of 15 to 20%. Rode most of the West Point Cogal route with the dreaded Mountain Road all the way to the top. FUCKER of a hill. You know when a road around these mountainous parts is called “Mountain Road” that you’re in for a good ride. But yes, I am weak, more hill repeats for me (and, BONUS, I have exquisite tan, make that burn, lines from riding 3 hours in the sun for the first time in too long as well)!

    You should come to Seattle; my hilly route here is 1600m in just over 30km. Its called the Seattle Tre Chime.

  5. @Teocalli

    Thanks.  Obsessive isn’ the problem.   Loved your guest article on competitive  “recovery  rides”. Made me laugh out loud. That’s me too.

  6. @frank

    Backroom deals with the family,  ha ha.  Cycling has caused me  to make more of these than just about any other subject.  If there is a backroom I’ll deal, so long as I get to ride. Thanks for the welcome.

    @Teocalli

    Thanks.  Obsessive isn’ the problem.   Loved your guest article on competitive  “recovery  rides”. Made me laugh out loud. That’s me too.

  7. @frank

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @Buck Rogers

    Longest ride on tap for me today in over a year. I will indeed being clearing my mind before I am done.

    Also, LOVING that lead photo.

    Don’t you live in Cycling Heaven?

    FUCK it is Hilly around here! I am much too weak. I ended up only riding a tad over 86 k’s but had over 1100 meters of climbing with multiple grades of 15 to 20%. Rode most of the West Point Cogal route with the dreaded Mountain Road all the way to the top. FUCKER of a hill. You know when a road around these mountainous parts is called “Mountain Road” that you’re in for a good ride. But yes, I am weak, more hill repeats for me (and, BONUS, I have exquisite tan, make that burn, lines from riding 3 hours in the sun for the first time in too long as well)!

    You should come to Seattle; my hilly route here is 1600m in just over 30km. Its called the Seattle Tre Chime.

    Jeeezhus!  That’s the trouble around here, someone always has one worse than me!  I do, indeed, need to come out and ride your routes sometime!

  8. @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    @Buck Rogers

    Longest ride on tap for me today in over a year. I will indeed being clearing my mind before I am done.

    Also, LOVING that lead photo.

    Don’t you live in Cycling Heaven?

    FUCK it is Hilly around here! I am much too weak. I ended up only riding a tad over 86 k’s but had over 1100 meters of climbing with multiple grades of 15 to 20%. Rode most of the West Point Cogal route with the dreaded Mountain Road all the way to the top. FUCKER of a hill. You know when a road around these mountainous parts is called “Mountain Road” that you’re in for a good ride. But yes, I am weak, more hill repeats for me (and, BONUS, I have exquisite tan, make that burn, lines from riding 3 hours in the sun for the first time in too long as well)!

    You should come to Seattle; my hilly route here is 1600m in just over 30km. Its called the Seattle Tre Chime.

    Jeeezhus! That’s the trouble around here, someone always has one worse than me! I do, indeed, need to come out and ride your routes sometime!

    STV

  9. @Finn

    This article has compelled me to meditate deeply. Doing so brought me back to Rule #6, and how there is part of personal discovery to it as well. We discover our own limitations, as well as entertain those of our emotions.

    The position of ‘mind’ and ‘legs’ in this rule are interchangeable, I think.  If my mind is in a bit of a funk, freeing the legs will clear it.

  10. @Brian W Duly noted, I guess there is a sort of balance between the two. I would have to guess that the steed is the medium between them.

  11. @frank

    @Teocalli

    @strathlubnaig

    @frank

    @the Engine

    @Harminator

    @the Engine

    Love those long rides where you look at them on the app and you can see the whole island…

    My island must be bigger than your island.

    Or my rides are longer than your rides

    I thought Scotland was a Yard, not an island?

    Scotland is a landmass which had the misfortune of bumping into what is often called England eons ago. This is now called Scotlands Yard.

    and depending on the upcoming vote we may have to dig out the canal and push it off again.

    Its amazing that secession vote is allowed to go through. Last time that happened in the United States it started a war that The South thinks is still going on or, if not, will start up again sometime after they finish this Mint Julep.

    Actually, Scotland is an island if you’re anywhere near the northern beaches in Sydney, Australia.

  12. @frank

    You should come to Seattle; my hilly route here is 1600m in just over 30km. Its called the Seattle Tre Chime.

    Frank, that’s awesome and hilarious. Hilarious because I have a “Sequim Tre Cime” and awesome because your route is a lot hillier than mine. (Mine was named in a fit of irony.)

  13. OK, first time poster here, recovering fat guy, slow guy, never a “roadie” type guy til November or so.

    My only sizeable ride to date (not 8 hrs, only 67 mi at ~17 mph, so, slower than you lot) I really enjoyed exactly what is described here. I had no ideas what hills were coming, or, if after one, there’d be another  WORSE one, or “hey google didn’t say this road was dirt!” etc. 

    But it all reminded me of riding in 7th grade, when I was first allowed to go ride in the countryside alone.  Great article.

  14. Set off on a ride like this about three weeks ago, feeling adventurous and good on the early hills.  Then the hills just kept coming and coming and coming, any direction I chose.  Finally grovelled my way back home and collapsed in full gear on the nearest soft surface.  One of the best days on a bike I can remember in my short time as a Pedalwan.

  15. Speaking of long rides, just been reading this most awesome of articles about the most awesome of men.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27333310

    Kind of put’s worrying about the length of your socks into proportion.

  16. Great article! I went exploring on my VV Day ride, and not only got lost twice, but also found quite possibly the best tarmaced and breath takingly viewed coastal road in the North East UK (Route 1 on Sustrans between Lynemouth and Cresswell) . That moment when you the wind is low, the road is silent and all you have to do is pedal and take in the sights.

    Bliss.

  17. @sinikl

    OK, first time poster here, recovering fat guy, slow guy, never a “roadie” type guy til November or so.

    My only sizeable ride to date (not 8 hrs, only 67 mi at ~17 mph, so, slower than you lot) I really enjoyed exactly what is described here. I had no ideas what hills were coming, or, if after one, there’d be another WORSE one, or “hey google didn’t say this road was dirt!” etc.

    But it all reminded me of riding in 7th grade, when I was first allowed to go ride in the countryside alone. Great article.

    The Ride gets under your skin, doesn’t it? Welcome.

  18. @Shaun Kelly

    Speaking of long rides, just been reading this most awesome of articles about the most awesome of men.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27333310

    Kind of put’s worrying about the length of your socks into proportion.

    Wow.

    Just…     wow.

  19. @Shaun Kelly

    Speaking of long rides, just been reading this most awesome of articles about the most awesome of men.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27333310

    Kind of put’s worrying about the length of your socks into proportion.

    Amazing merit! Eager to see the film telling this story.

  20. Frank,

    Bien joué, mon ami.

    I am inspired to ride on some new roads.  Anyone in the PNW ride up to Lake Champlain north of Sultan off of Hwy 2?

  21. @unversio

    @Shaun Kelly

    Speaking of long rides, just been reading this most awesome of articles about the most awesome of men.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27333310

    Kind of put’s worrying about the length of your socks into proportion.

    Amazing merit! Eager to see the film telling this story.

    Looks incredible!

  22. @unversio

    @Shaun Kelly

    Speaking of long rides, just been reading this most awesome of articles about the most awesome of men.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27333310

    Kind of put’s worrying about the length of your socks into proportion.

    Amazing merit! Eager to see the film telling this story.

    Now that looks worth watching.

    Not only was he an incredible man and an incredible rider, he also looked this awesome…

    Gino

  23. Great timing, loving the comments.

    Three planned century or better rides in the next month…. Looking forward to them for many of the reasons described here.  Nicely done.

  24. @Teocalli

    It was digging a canal that got Scotland stuck to England in the first place ;)

  25. @Disuye

    @Teocalli

    It was digging a canal that got Scotland stuck to England in the first place ;)

    Ha Ha!  Most people forget that and the fact that the investors were quietly reimbursed courtesy English taxpayer.  Though they were more trying to cash in on the Silver,Spices and Sugar than build the Panama Canal.  So the question is what would the repayment of that bailout be worth with interest now?

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