Reverence: Straight Round Tubes

Tradition and innovation sit mostly comfortably alongside each other in Cycling. The bicycle itself is inherently a very simple machine, the basic design of which has remained the same for centuries; frame, two wheels, cranks, saddle, handlebars. It’s what has been done to these elements along the way that has shaped what the modern road bike (because mountain bikes are way out there and another realm altogether) now looks like.

To me, they look like crap.

The ‘advancements’ made through the use of carbon fibre have without doubt benefitted those who really need to benefit in incremental steps, and that is Pro riders. These guys and gals are paid to ride a bicycle as fast as they can and to get it across a line hundreds of kilometres away from where they started before hundreds of others, sometimes by the barest of margins. That’s not us. We ride because we love the freedom, the health benefits, all that bullshit that Bicycling magazine will give you 7 tips on how to do it. We don’t need aero-tubed frames and deep dish carbon wheels, but we want them. Sure, all this stuff makes our experience better, and I’m not suggesting we all ride around on K-Mart bikes, even though we’d still probably have some form of fun if we did. Even if you race, even A grade at club level, or have a crack at Nationals, the bike isn’t going to make you win. I’ll repeat; you’re not a Pro.

This whole ‘aero’ frame fad that has taken over the peloton is all well and good when the sport’s top prizes are at stake. When rolling around with your mates and having a coffee before and a beer after is the modus operandi, then why not do it with a modicum of style? Aero bikes are not stylish. Those oversized, flattened, sharp edged carbon members (I refuse to call them tubes) are just downright ugly. The curvy swooping lines and bent-six-ways stays are an abomination. And some of the stems popping up now look like tumours growing from Frankenstein’s neck. I don’t like them, in case you’re not picking up on that.

The more I look at the new crop of ’boutique’ builders working with steel, the more I realise how much of a blight these carbon race frames are. My eyes are attuned to the simplicity of round, straight tubes, with a sensible diameter, and if they’re held together with lugs, well that’s not a bad thing either. But even these simple things of beauty can be sullied by another modern invention, the sloping top tube. A lot of the bikes that appeared in my feeds from the recent NAHMBS featured quite radically sloping tt’s, and whenever a flat tt’ed bike popped up it was even more apparent that flat is where it’s at. And I’m not saying this because I own such a bike; in fact, there was a period after purchasing my Jaegher where I questioned whether I should have had some slope built in. But the more I witness the glut of ugly that is is the Pro peloton, I’m glad I listened to the denizens who lovingly handcrafted my beauty, and kept the tubes like they are meant to be: flat, round and straight.

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180 Replies to “Reverence: Straight Round Tubes”

  1. @litvi

    @Haldy

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Love my carbon babies but very excited about my first custom Don Walker steel – this one is my Hour track bike. Can’t wait to get her on the rollers and then the track!

    I’m not sure why we can’t love all kinds of bikes? I do. But I agree the curvy tubes are not my taste.

    I also love compact geometry; any custom steel road bike I get will be a compact – I love the look and I love the lower perch for waiting Casually Deliberate or getting into a tuck.

    Also, every carbon bike is technically handmade; the carbon is always hand-laid into the mold, whether its happening in the US, China, or Taiwan.

    HOLY FUCK!!! This bike is AMAZING!!! You are going to do a full write-up with more photos and spec’s, etc, right?????

    Yes..it is an AMAZING steed. Having 5 Don Walkers myself I can attest to the beauty and ride! I would like to take this small opportunity to apologize to @frank in public for letting my mechanic’s mischievous side coming out. His bike is obviously( I know you have all already spotted that) not rule compliant as I left the stem sitting high…on pink and blue spacers that are my team colors.

    With great amusement I watched a twitch develop in his right temple as the bike sat in his booth at the show. Finally…I relented and loaned him the tools he needed to properly slam the stem. Sadly…I did not have any black spacers to loan him… ;-)

    Some will also notice the valve stems top-side in one photo, and in their proper place in the other. Some more hijinks from @Haldy. The stem spacer placement was pretty funny, but that was once-and-done. The repeated discovery of the wheels upside down on the other hand… that led to some serious consternation.

    To be fair, the bike was taken in and out of the stand many times to show people..over at Don Walker’s booth and to have photos taken of it. Maybe a little more leeway than usual can be afforded there.

  2. @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Love my carbon babies but very excited about my first custom Don Walker steel – this one is my Hour track bike. Can’t wait to get her on the rollers and then the track!

    I’m not sure why we can’t love all kinds of bikes? I do. But I agree the curvy tubes are not my taste.

    I also love compact geometry; any custom steel road bike I get will be a compact – I love the look and I love the lower perch for waiting Casually Deliberate or getting into a tuck.

    Also, every carbon bike is technically handmade; the carbon is always hand-laid into the mold, whether its happening in the US, China, or Taiwan.

    HOLY FUCK!!! This bike is AMAZING!!! You are going to do a full write-up with more photos and spec’s, etc, right?????

    Yes..it is an AMAZING steed. Having 5 Don Walkers myself I can attest to the beauty and ride! I would like to take this small opportunity to apologize to @frank in public for letting my mechanic’s mischievous side coming out. His bike is obviously( I know you have all already spotted that) not rule compliant as I left the stem sitting high…on pink and blue spacers that are my team colors.

    With great amusement I watched a twitch develop in his right temple as the bike sat in his booth at the show. Finally…I relented and loaned him the tools he needed to properly slam the stem. Sadly…I did not have any black spacers to loan him… ;-)

    Some will also notice the valve stems top-side in one photo, and in their proper place in the other. Some more hijinks from @Haldy. The stem spacer placement was pretty funny, but that was once-and-done. The repeated discovery of the wheels upside down on the other hand… that led to some serious consternation.

    To be fair, the bike was taken in and out of the stand many times to show people..over at Don Walker’s booth and to have photos taken of it. Maybe a little more leeway than usual can be afforded there.

    Nope.  That’s sorry, tired, and sad excuse.  There is no leeway for that kind of carelessness.  Besides, it’s funnier to think you did it on purpose.

  3. @litvi

    @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Love my carbon babies but very excited about my first custom Don Walker steel – this one is my Hour track bike. Can’t wait to get her on the rollers and then the track!

    I’m not sure why we can’t love all kinds of bikes? I do. But I agree the curvy tubes are not my taste.

    I also love compact geometry; any custom steel road bike I get will be a compact – I love the look and I love the lower perch for waiting Casually Deliberate or getting into a tuck.

    Also, every carbon bike is technically handmade; the carbon is always hand-laid into the mold, whether its happening in the US, China, or Taiwan.

    HOLY FUCK!!! This bike is AMAZING!!! You are going to do a full write-up with more photos and spec’s, etc, right?????

    Yes..it is an AMAZING steed. Having 5 Don Walkers myself I can attest to the beauty and ride! I would like to take this small opportunity to apologize to @frank in public for letting my mechanic’s mischievous side coming out. His bike is obviously( I know you have all already spotted that) not rule compliant as I left the stem sitting high…on pink and blue spacers that are my team colors.

    With great amusement I watched a twitch develop in his right temple as the bike sat in his booth at the show. Finally…I relented and loaned him the tools he needed to properly slam the stem. Sadly…I did not have any black spacers to loan him… ;-)

    Some will also notice the valve stems top-side in one photo, and in their proper place in the other. Some more hijinks from @Haldy. The stem spacer placement was pretty funny, but that was once-and-done. The repeated discovery of the wheels upside down on the other hand… that led to some serious consternation.

    To be fair, the bike was taken in and out of the stand many times to show people..over at Don Walker’s booth and to have photos taken of it. Maybe a little more leeway than usual can be afforded there.

    Nope. That’s sorry, tired, and sad excuse. There is no leeway for that kind of carelessness. Besides, it’s funnier to think you did it on purpose.

    Well, I sadly, can’t claim to be the only person to handle the steed. There were several others( not well versed in the Rules..) that moved the bike about. Heck @gianni was there and since he knew it was @frank‘s machine he may…may have added to the mischief level a bit.

  4. @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Love my carbon babies but very excited about my first custom Don Walker steel – this one is my Hour track bike. Can’t wait to get her on the rollers and then the track!

    I’m not sure why we can’t love all kinds of bikes? I do. But I agree the curvy tubes are not my taste.

    I also love compact geometry; any custom steel road bike I get will be a compact – I love the look and I love the lower perch for waiting Casually Deliberate or getting into a tuck.

    Also, every carbon bike is technically handmade; the carbon is always hand-laid into the mold, whether its happening in the US, China, or Taiwan.

    HOLY FUCK!!! This bike is AMAZING!!! You are going to do a full write-up with more photos and spec’s, etc, right?????

    Yes..it is an AMAZING steed. Having 5 Don Walkers myself I can attest to the beauty and ride! I would like to take this small opportunity to apologize to @frank in public for letting my mechanic’s mischievous side coming out. His bike is obviously( I know you have all already spotted that) not rule compliant as I left the stem sitting high…on pink and blue spacers that are my team colors.

    With great amusement I watched a twitch develop in his right temple as the bike sat in his booth at the show. Finally…I relented and loaned him the tools he needed to properly slam the stem. Sadly…I did not have any black spacers to loan him… ;-)

    Some will also notice the valve stems top-side in one photo, and in their proper place in the other. Some more hijinks from @Haldy. The stem spacer placement was pretty funny, but that was once-and-done. The repeated discovery of the wheels upside down on the other hand… that led to some serious consternation.

    To be fair, the bike was taken in and out of the stand many times to show people..over at Don Walker’s booth and to have photos taken of it. Maybe a little more leeway than usual can be afforded there.

    Nope. That’s sorry, tired, and sad excuse. There is no leeway for that kind of carelessness. Besides, it’s funnier to think you did it on purpose.

    Well, I sadly, can’t claim to be the only person to handle the steed. There were several others( not well versed in the Rules..) that moved the bike about. Heck @gianni was there and since he knew it was @frank‘s machine he may…may have added to the mischief level a bit.

    Is this bike created with a super short wheelbase or is it just a function a the angle the snapshot was taken? And almost looks like more seatpost than seat tube! And rear hub is right under the saddle. And bars out in front of front hub. That’s a gorgeous bike indeed with the black and orange fade, the smokin’ wheel set and drivetrain. Just really hot. Weird photo angle I guess.

  5. #1 & #2

    Cannondale tubes are about as close to traditional as you will find in a modern bike.  Roundish and with a top tube that is a joy to drape a leg over when seeking a casually deliberate pose.

    Evo HiMod on the left and CAAD 10 on the right.

    Saddle angle on the Evo has now been attended to.

  6. @wilburrox

    @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @litvi

    @Haldy

    @Buck Rogers

    @frank

    Love my carbon babies but very excited about my first custom Don Walker steel – this one is my Hour track bike. Can’t wait to get her on the rollers and then the track!

    I’m not sure why we can’t love all kinds of bikes? I do. But I agree the curvy tubes are not my taste.

    I also love compact geometry; any custom steel road bike I get will be a compact – I love the look and I love the lower perch for waiting Casually Deliberate or getting into a tuck.

    Also, every carbon bike is technically handmade; the carbon is always hand-laid into the mold, whether its happening in the US, China, or Taiwan.

    HOLY FUCK!!! This bike is AMAZING!!! You are going to do a full write-up with more photos and spec’s, etc, right?????

    Yes..it is an AMAZING steed. Having 5 Don Walkers myself I can attest to the beauty and ride! I would like to take this small opportunity to apologize to @frank in public for letting my mechanic’s mischievous side coming out. His bike is obviously( I know you have all already spotted that) not rule compliant as I left the stem sitting high…on pink and blue spacers that are my team colors.

    With great amusement I watched a twitch develop in his right temple as the bike sat in his booth at the show. Finally…I relented and loaned him the tools he needed to properly slam the stem. Sadly…I did not have any black spacers to loan him… ;-)

    Some will also notice the valve stems top-side in one photo, and in their proper place in the other. Some more hijinks from @Haldy. The stem spacer placement was pretty funny, but that was once-and-done. The repeated discovery of the wheels upside down on the other hand… that led to some serious consternation.

    To be fair, the bike was taken in and out of the stand many times to show people..over at Don Walker’s booth and to have photos taken of it. Maybe a little more leeway than usual can be afforded there.

    Nope. That’s sorry, tired, and sad excuse. There is no leeway for that kind of carelessness. Besides, it’s funnier to think you did it on purpose.

    Well, I sadly, can’t claim to be the only person to handle the steed. There were several others( not well versed in the Rules..) that moved the bike about. Heck @gianni was there and since he knew it was @frank‘s machine he may…may have added to the mischief level a bit.

    Is this bike created with a super short wheelbase or is it just a function a the angle the snapshot was taken? And almost looks like more seatpost than seat tube! And rear hub is right under the saddle. And bars out in front of front hub. That’s a gorgeous bike indeed with the black and orange fade, the smokin’ wheel set and drivetrain. Just really hot. Weird photo angle I guess.

    It’s a combination of many things. The sightly odd angle of the photo, the gear combo/chain length on the bike has the rear wheel slammed very far forward in the dropouts. Also track bikes have steeper angles than road bikes. The frame is made as small as possible so as to be as stiff as possible. Comfort and compliance are just not considerations in a track steed. Spinning is the name of the game on the track..so the position is a little more forward on the bike than it would be if you wear smashing the big gears on a road bike. For example…my road bikes are 73 degree seat tubes, my Walker track bikes are 74.5 degree seat tubes.

  7. @kixsand

    Those Cannnondale’s are not too sloped, they look pretty good. Colnago still makes the C60 in traditional geometry. And it you go to the North American Handmade Bicycle show you can see many, many frames being made with traditional geometry.

  8. @ChrisO

    Is there a TCR I haven’t heard of made by someone other than [email protected]?

     

    Mass market, corporate led, niche stealing, trend following, “make everything well” Giant? That’s bollocks that is. Ever been to Taiwan and seen the factory floor? Ever seen a massive company copy the little fella and put them out of business by throwing money at marketing their brand. These guys are Spesh without the American sense of entitlement. Trek without the background development. Technical trend followers and band wagon jumpers. When you realise how much these guys make for other people you realise they can’t possibly get it “wrong”. Which is why this site has merit, opening people eyes to the myriad options and not just regurgitating tired marketing cliches…”it rides better than last years” is the mantra for all these companies. “Last years” being the clue.

     

    Give Giant, and the other big corporates a chance, and you will be running to the dealer every year for fear of being seen on last years colours, wheels or group set. It’s already begun, I see riders in shop everyday getting sucked in to this BS. They will eventually reduce this industry to a few key players, with no alternative apart from the uber expensive chi-chi custom market. It will be like the car industry – and I have to say it is in my opinion time to see it for what it is.

     

    This industry has many great facets – we look to you, the guys riding the bikes regularly, to see through the bullshit and support something as passionate as you are about your riding.

     

    So, to paraphrase…..Dude, It’s a fucking [email protected]

     

    *Rant Over*

     

  9. @kixsand

    #1 & #2

    Cannondale tubes are about as close to traditional as you will find in a modern bike. Roundish and with a top tube that is a joy to drape a leg over when seeking a casually deliberate pose.

    Evo HiMod on the left and CAAD 10 on the right.

    Saddle angle on the Evo has now been attended to.

    Two of the nicest looking “modern” bikes on the market. But I suppose I’m extremely biased with an Evo Hi-Mod and a CAAD 8. A CAAD 10 would be a nice addition but a CAAD X or a CAAD 10 Track would make more sense.

    What are the tyres on the Super Six? I’m thinking some of the new Corsa speed tubulars for mine.

  10. @ChrisO

    @wilburrox

    I’d say the TCR has its own place as a classic bike and shape. The first alloy versions marked such a paradigm shift it makes it just as deserving of a pedestal in the pantheon as any bike of another era IMHO.

    And even though it now has flattened tubes and an oversize BB it’s still unmistakable, as well as being a fantastic all-round ride. Add cost into the equation and I honestly don’t think you can do any better.

    The 2016 model is a bigger update. I know someone who’s ridden the previous and current versions and says the new one is noticeably better. The only ‘downside’ is that the top model only comes with an integrated seatpost, which is great for stiffness but a pain if you want to travel with the bike.

    I could have got a good deal on one before I left Dubai but with discs around the corner I’m thinking it’s not a good time, not for high-end stuff anyway.

    I agree about the TCR being a classic.

    I had an alloy TCR in the ONCE colours with Shimano 105. It was a great bike – like just about anything Mike Burrows designed.

    I saw a Giant MCR for sale a while back. I wish the UCI hadn’t banned them, so we could have seen them vs the Trek Y-Foil, etc etc

    The new Defy with discs is a sexy machine too.

     

  11. @chris

    Nice!

    The tires on the Supersix are Veloflex Master 25 Clinchers – awesome tires.  Really plush ride and yet super grippy in the corners and of course they look tremendously cool.

    I just bought the CAAD 10 and couldn’t be happier with it…amazing bike…and such a great compliment to the Supersix.

  12. @brett

    Thank you kindly. The V runs strongly and deeply with my wife, too, it seems. Sadly too deep for her to tap into right now. I live in hope!

  13. Elegance is cycling.  Attitude is trivial.  Trivial things must be relinquished for maximum V.  That is why we shave our legs.  Leg hair is unnecessary, so it is removed.  The prime directive is to move elegantly, silently, and with maximum V.  A bicycle has two wheels because it is the least number of wheels that improves upon walking.  The frame is a triangle because it is the form with the least number of angles.  The question of the proper material and shape for the frame presents a conundrum.  There is great elegance in round, straight, steel tubing, particularly in its manufacture, durability.  But, there is also great elegance in aero carbon fibre tubing, which jettisons both weight and wind resistance.  But durability is not trivial, nor is the nagging feeling that carbon fibre is unnecessary for any rider who is not depending on race results for their next meal.  The rules oblige us to ride, first, foremost and without excuse, but when there is an opportunity to choose elegance, we must jettison the trivial and embrace the V.  Where two divergent paths present different opportunities for elegance, the rules enter superposition where both decisions are both right and wrong, and we have no choice but to debate until the bar runs out of beer.   

  14. @ChrisO

    Gorgeous bike! I recently picked up a second hand 2010 TCR and haven’t looked back, best handling bike I’ve ever ridden. You’ll have to excuse the bar tape and uncut steerer, haven’t got round to giving it the chop yet.

  15. @fignons barber

    I’ve narrowed my list down to a Jaegher or one of these:

    My Sunday riding pal has a steel Zullo in that paint scheme. Bought it from the man himself, at the NAHBS a few years back in Richmond. Got a great deal, as he didn’t want to drag them back to Italy.

    At first I hated the paint, but it has definitely grown on me.

  16. @frank

    Fuck. I couldn’t take it anymore. I just ordered my Don Walker road bike. FFS.

    Sweet…you’re catching up!

  17. @Haldy

    @frank

    Fuck. I couldn’t take it anymore. I just ordered my Don Walker road bike. FFS.

    Sweet…you’re catching up!

    You don’t screw around with pink and blue color schemes, do you?

  18. @Owen

    @Haldy

    @frank

    Fuck. I couldn’t take it anymore. I just ordered my Don Walker road bike. FFS.

    Sweet…you’re catching up!

    You don’t screw around with pink and blue color schemes, do you?

    No sir! Much like @Frank with black/white/Orange as colors for the Velominatus, I have my own team, Single Malt Velo,…and our brand is pink and blue!

  19. While they may not be round as such, you can’t argue that the profile view of Cervelo’s R series is right up there with @Kixsand‘s ‘dales when it comes to carbon frames with a classic layout. The Redback spent some time connecting with nature on this morning’s solo spin while I dealt with a rear flat.

  20. @mulebeatsdrums

    Hi Mr Mule, are you aware there is a London Cogal on 9th April? Details in the Cogal section, and I’ll be happy to answer any questions oiver there.

  21. @Mikael Liddy

    While they may not be round as such, you can’t argue that the profile view of Cervelo’s R series is right up there with @Kixsand‘s ‘dales when it comes to carbon frames with a classic layout. The Redback spent some time connecting with nature on this morning’s solo spin while I dealt with a rear flat.

    Heyzeus – hope no-one was hurt in the accident………

  22. Wonderfully timed article. I’m finishing building up my 4th steel bike tomorrow and posting for sale my last non-steel frame shortly thereafter.

  23. The new winter / rain bike, the Shand Skinnymalinky – custom Reynolds/ Columbus tubing with a painted carbon fork. Surprisingly light given the 32 spoke wheels, specced to cope with Roubaix cobbles next month. The mudguards will be removed soon, currently fitted to protect from Scottish council road salt, a most corrosive granular substance spread liberally November to March. Yes it is a Brookes saddle!

  24. @ChrisO

    Thanks for validating my point!

     

    The Ag2R Focus bikes have to be one of the better looking carbon frames in the peloton, nice and straight, seat stays meeting seat tube in the correct place… got  areal soft spot for this team.

     

  25. @Mikael Liddy

    While they may not be round as such, you can’t argue that the profile view of Cervelo’s R series is right up there with @Kixsand‘s ‘dales when it comes to carbon frames with a classic layout. The Redback spent some time connecting with nature on this morning’s solo spin while I dealt with a rear flat.

    Yep, nice and straight, no ridiculously bulbous tube junctions. And I’m a Cervelo hater from way back!

  26. @JohnB

    The new winter / rain bike, the Shand Skinnymalinky – custom Reynolds/ Columbus tubing with a painted carbon fork. Surprisingly light given the 32 spoke wheels, specced to cope with Roubaix cobbles next month. The mudguards will be removed soon, currently fitted to protect from Scottish council road salt, a most corrosive granular substance spread liberally November to March. Yes it is a Brookes saddle!

    Very nice indeed! A true winter bike.

  27. @frank

    Fuck. I couldn’t take it anymore. I just ordered my Don Walker road bike. FFS.

    Well FUCK!  Must have been something in the air!  I ordered my Hampsten Ti Gran Paradiso yesterday as well.  Spoke with Stephen and it is a done deal.  Will get the measurements set in May when I come out your way and Kent Eriksen will be doing the frame welding.

    The VMH still a bit in the dark, that is why I can still type with both hands (a la Paul Newman and The Hustler).

    How did your VMH take it?  Perhaps we should not let them meet this May after all???

    Watch out fellow Velominati, it might be catching!

    And Congrats, Frahnk on ordering your next family member!!!

     

     

  28. @Buck Rogers


    Well FUCK! Must have been something in the air! I ordered my Hampsten Ti Gran Paradiso yesterday as well. Spoke with Stephen and it is a done deal. Will get the measurements set in May when I come out your way and Kent Eriksen will be doing the frame welding.

    Congrats yourself, Buck.  I’ve heard nothing but good things about the Hampstens — particularly in Ti — and about working with Steve.

  29. @cognition

    @Buck Rogers


    Well FUCK! Must have been something in the air! I ordered my Hampsten Ti Gran Paradiso yesterday as well. Spoke with Stephen and it is a done deal. Will get the measurements set in May when I come out your way and Kent Eriksen will be doing the frame welding.

    Congrats yourself, Buck. I’ve heard nothing but good things about the Hampstens — particularly in Ti — and about working with Steve.

    Thanks!!!  I have replied twice to this post (yesterday) and it has said that “your post has been published” two times but I am not seeing it so forgive me if my replies show up three times!

    Well, to paraphrase my other responses, as my British college roommate used to say, I’m properly chuffed about it!  Or as we Yanks say, I am incredibly fucking psyched!!!  Cannot believe that it is happening!  It is going to be fucking perfetto!  Kent Eriksen is going to make the frame from Steve’s measurements and his geometry.  Talk about a bike-building marriage made in fucking heaven (the type of heaven I hope to go to).

    I already have the 2014 Super Record 11spd non-electric (should us the term “mechanical” and electric should be called “non-mechanical”, eh???) Groupo all bought and paid for and I am commissioning Big Al in Scotland to build me a set of 32 hole Nemesis Tubular/Royce Venus wheels this fall (for bombing the pave’ all over Europe for the next 6 years while living in Germany) when the next pound of flesh can be carved off my body.

    Future’s so bright, now where did I put my old blue Rudy Projects???

  30. @Teocalli

    @Buck Rogers

    The other one that springs to mind is the scene from Misery. Though I’m not going to post the clip……

    E-Gad!  Yup, that scene was brutal.   Stephen King sure knows how to screw up ones mind, doesn’t he?

  31. @MangoDave

    It should look very similar to this pic I found on google of a Gran Paradiso Ti.  But I’ll do “the bits” a bit different and have the Nemesis/Royce wheel set.

  32. @Teocalli

    Good choice of riding venue. I also frequent the lanes around and about these valleys and downs. Not on anything quite so vintage though,

    If it wasn’t for the squashed downtube, this would almost be there, the top tube is fairly flat when it’s parked level.

    I split my rides between this for every commute and wet ride, and this one when it’s fair;

    But there will have to be room for something like I rode in my youth; steel with shift lever(s) on the tube.

  33. @Waz

    Good choice of riding venue. I also frequent the lanes around and about these valleys and downs. Not on anything quite so vintage though,

     

    Then you should be making your way to the Chilterns on April 9 for the London-ish Cogal.

  34. @Oli the impression they gave was that they weren’t compatible with Rotor’s BBright system. Also, I’m not particularly keen on stumping up for a new crankset. LBS has something in the works though.

     

  35. Ah, yes I think that’s correct. Well, that is a pain. Wheels Manufacturing make a good one then, although I haven’t had as long-term experience with them as I have with the Praxis.

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